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The Dalai Lama’s Army ......(al Qaeda organization is attempting to assassinate the Dalai Lama)
NRO ^ | April 5, 2007 | Dave Kopel

Posted on 04/05/2007 4:25:21 AM PDT by IrishMike

A right to self-defense is recognized by the Dalai Lama — indeed, his predecessor tried to recruit an army. An al Qaeda organization is attempting to assassinate the Dalai Lama. Lashkar-e-Toiba, al Qaeda’s South Asian affiliate, is acting consistently with Osama bin Laden’s April 2006 denunciation of “pagan Buddhists.” This raises an interesting question: Can an ethical follower of Tibetan Buddhism kill someone in order to save the Dalai Lama? Or in order to fight religious totalitarianism in general?

Absolutely yes. Although some Westerners imagine that the Dalai Lama is an absolute pacifist, the teachings of the present Dalai Lama and of his predecessor, as well as the traditions of Tibetan Buddhism, all legitimize the use of deadly force against killers and would-be tyrants.

This may come as news to certain anti-American pacifists in the United States and Europe who are guilty of “Shangri-La-ism” — of what Jane Ardley (in her book The Tibetan Independence Movement) describes as the “idealized, romantic vision of Tibet as a land of enlightened, non-violent, happy and exotic people.” She observes, “For those in the West who look to Tibetan Buddhism for all the answers to their insecurities, the image of ‘violent’ Buddhists is uncomfortable particularly where Buddhism itself can be offered as a justification for their actions.” The tradition of forceful resistance to tyranny is very old in Tibet. For example, in the early centuries of the first millennium, ancient Tantric Buddhist texts gave “formulae for killing unjust kings” (Thomas Cleary, Classics of Buddhism and Zen, vol. 5).

Buddhist Tibet was a powerful warrior kingdom during the latter part of the first millennium. Later, during the thirteenth century, Tibet fell under Mongol control. The Mongols respected Buddhism, granted Tibet internal autonomy, provided military protection, and exempted Tibetans from military service.

(Excerpt) Read more at article.nationalreview.com ...


TOPICS: Editorial; Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: alqaeda; banglist; dalailama; india; terrorism; wot

1 posted on 04/05/2007 4:25:24 AM PDT by IrishMike
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To: IrishMike

Contracted out by Red China?


2 posted on 04/05/2007 4:27:08 AM PDT by Natchez Hawk ("Truth: the anti-drug war")
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To: Natchez Hawk

According to the Dalai Lama, “If someone has a gun and is trying to kill you, it would be reasonable to shoot back with your own gun.” (Seattle Times, May 15, 2001)

Nothing wrong with that thinking.


3 posted on 04/05/2007 4:33:00 AM PDT by IrishMike ( What happens when aliens breed with sheep ? - Democrats)
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To: Natchez Hawk; IrishMike

Guess Dave Kopel has’nt heard of the Special Frontier Force of the Indian Army.Composed mainly of Tibetan refugees after the 1962 Sino-Indian war,these folks are trained for infiltration deep into Chinese territory.


4 posted on 04/05/2007 4:34:36 AM PDT by sukhoi-30mki
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To: Natchez Hawk

The Chinese asking their buddies in Pakistan for getting a Jihadi on hire.


5 posted on 04/05/2007 4:35:33 AM PDT by sukhoi-30mki
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To: IrishMike

Indeed, ‘pacifism’ need not be a pact with self-destruction.


6 posted on 04/05/2007 4:36:30 AM PDT by Natchez Hawk ("Truth: the anti-drug war")
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To: sukhoi-30mki

The Legion of Doom.

Interesting how oppressors find such common ground with each other.


7 posted on 04/05/2007 4:38:58 AM PDT by Natchez Hawk ("Truth: the anti-drug war")
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To: IrishMike
Hollywood Buddhists unite!
8 posted on 04/05/2007 4:40:11 AM PDT by bmwcyle (Freep Fox they drop the ball on GOE)
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To: IrishMike
Hooray for the Allied Lama ... long may he live!


9 posted on 04/05/2007 4:49:47 AM PDT by Daffynition
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To: IrishMike

SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

Formation Insignia of the Special Frontier Force


From Elite Forces of India and Pakistan, by Ken Conboy and Paul Hannon


The Special Frontier Force (SFF) was created on 14 November 1962, near the end of the Indo-China War. The Cabinet Secretariat had ordered the raising of an elite guerrilla force composed mainly of Tibetan refugees. It's main goal was to conduct covert operations behind Chinese lines in the event of another Indo-China war. The first Inspector General of the SFF was a retired Indian Army Major General who was known for his unconventional thinking. Soon the SFF came to be known as 'Establishment 22' due to its first Inspector General, who used to be commander of 22 Mountain Regiment during World War II.

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SFF commandos, armed with the Mk.4 Sterling, wearing parachute crash helmets.

The SFF made its home base at Chakrata, 100 km from the city of Dehra Dun. Chakrata was home to the large Tibetan refugee population and was a mountain town in the foothills of the Himalayas. Starting with a force of 12,000 men, the SFF commenced six months of training in rock climbing and guerrilla warfare. The Intelligence agencies from India and the US also helped in raising the force; namely CIA & RAW. The SFF's weapons were all provided by the US and consisted mainly of M-1, M-2 and M-3 machine guns. Heavy weapons were not provided.

By late 1963, inter-service rivalry led to severe criticism by the Indian Army. To prove that the SFF's worth, the Inspector General sent 120 men from the SFF for a field exercise, codenamed Garuda, with the Army. The exercise proved to be a dramatic success for the SFF and the Army was now less inclined to criticise the force.

In 1964, the SFF led by the Inspector General, began its airborne training at Agra. The SFF then began its own airborne training program at Sarasawan airbase near Saharanpur. By the late-1960s, the SFF was organised into six battalions for administrative purposes. Each battalion, consisting of six companies, was commanded by  Tibetan who had a rank equivalent to a lieutenant colonel in the Army. A Tibetan major or captain commanded each company, which was the primary unit used in operations. Females also participated in the force and they were in the signal and medical companies. During this time, the SFF was never used against it's intended enemy, China. However, the unit did conduct limited cross-border reconnaissance operations, as well as highly classified raids to place sensors in the Himalayas to detect Chinese nuclear and missile tests.

1971 saw the SFF being used in major combat in the Indo-Pak war. Elements of the force were sent to Mizoram in late October. By November 1971, around 3000 SFF members were deployed next to the Chittagong Hill Tracts. With cross-border attacks becoming more frequent, the SFF was then ordered to attack the Chittagong Hill Tracts. For this operation, code-named 'Eagle', the SFF members were given Bulgarian AK-47s and US carbines. This operation saw the first Dapon, Tibetan equivalent of a Brigadier, to command part of the SFF task force.

With war right around the corner, the SFF was given several mission plans, including the destruction of the Kaptai Dam and other bridges. The Inspector General urged that the SFF be used to capture Chittagong, but this was found not favourable, since SFF members did not have artillery or airlift support to conduct a mission of that magnitude. After three weeks of border fighting, the SFF divided its six battalions into three columns and moved into East Pakistan on 03 December 1971. After capturing several villages in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, the Tibetans were given mortars and recoilless rifles and also two Indian Air Force Mi-4 helicopters.

With the Pakistani Lt. General A.A.K. Niazi signing the ceasefire on 17 December, the SFF had lost 56 men and nearly 190 wounded. The SFF was able to block a potential escape route for East Pakistani forces into Burma. They also halted members of Pakistan's 97 Independent Brigade and 2 Commando Battalion in the Chittagong Hill Tracts. For their bravery and courage in battle, 580 SFF members were awarded cash prizes by the Indian Govt. In 1973, the original Inspector General of the SFF was replaced and in 1975 a new rule pertaining to the SFF was issued. This prohibited the SFF from being deployed within 10 km of the Indo-Chinese border. This came about after several incidents in which SFF commandos had crossed the border and conducted unsanctioned cross-border operations.

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A Dapon (Brigadier) from the SFF. He wears a maroon beret with the SFF cap badge; the same badge is seen on the belt buckle.

By the late 1970s, Indo-Chinese relations had eased up somewhat and the Indian Government was thinking twice about maintaining this force. With the future of the SFF being uncertain, the force was soon given a new mission: counter-terrorism. Since the SFF consisted largely of Tibetans, they were seen as an ideal counter-terrorist force since they were not directly related to India's communal politics. Thus in 1977, the Director General for Security dispatched 500 SFF commandos to Sarasawa for possible action against rioters during national elections.

With the elections passing away without any major incidents, only 60 SFF commandos were retained for counter-terrorist duties. However, over 500 Army troops were sent to Sarasawa for counter-terrorist training. They formed a elite new detachment, known as the Special Group and they fall under the command of the SFF Inspector General. Surprisingly, all Tibetans were removed from the Special Group and returned to Chakrata.

Among the Tibetan members of the SFF, three commando battalions were raised for deployment around India; one of these battalions is normally stationed on the Siachen Glacier with the other Indian troops. The remaining SFF members were still trained for guerrilla operations in China.

By early 1984, the SFF's elite Special Group became the primary counter-terrorist force in India. They participated in the assault on Golden Temple, but the mission was to prove faulty, due to a lack of intelligence on the militants' whereabouts in the temple locality. The SFF was also used for VIP security in late 1984 around the Prime Minister following the assassination of Indira Gandhi. Currently, one SFF battalion is stationed in the Siachen Glacier. In 1985-1986 several SFF members were given bravery medals for their actions on the glacier. The current SFF force levels are around 10,000 men. Battalions are still composed of six companies, each company consisting of 123 men. There is also a force of around 700 Gorkhas in the SFF at any given time.

Training conducted at Chakrata, lasts six months and is similar to India Army training, with additional instruction in guerrilla tactics and rock-climbing. All SFF commandos are parachute qualified after five jumps, with three refresher jumps every year. US parachute instructors remained until 1966. SFF commandos wear the formation insignia on the shoulder with an Indian Army parachute wing being worn on the right breast. An airborne maroon beret is worn with a distinctive SFF beret badge and an SFF tab in worn on both shoulders. In 1989, the SFF began wearing standard Indian DPM (Disruptive Pattern Material) camouflage.


Copyright © BHARAT RAKSHAK. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part in any form or medium without express written permission of BHARAT RAKSHAK is prohibited.

10 posted on 04/05/2007 5:00:55 AM PDT by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
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To: CarrotAndStick

Excellent article / post.


11 posted on 04/05/2007 5:19:10 AM PDT by IrishMike ( What happens when aliens breed with sheep ? - Democrats)
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To: IrishMike

The difference between Christianity and Islam, demonstrated. A Christian will pray for the Buddhist; a Muslim will kill him.


12 posted on 04/05/2007 5:57:08 AM PDT by JimRed ("Hey, hey, Teddy K., how many girls did you drown today?" (Hello, I'm a TAGLINE virus. Please help m)
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To: IrishMike

Didn’t I read somewhere that the U.S. Left is upset with the Dalai Lama, too? If memory serves, he refused to show up at “peace” (actually anti-war, anti-US) rally because (paraphrasing here) demonstrating for peace is not peaceable, or something like that. Interesting.


13 posted on 04/05/2007 6:22:58 AM PDT by MizSterious (Anonymous sources often means "the voices in my head told me.")
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To: Natchez Hawk

Reply to #2

My thoughts exactly!


14 posted on 04/05/2007 11:02:06 AM PDT by MimirsWell (Musharraf - In the line of (back)fire.)
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To: IrishMike
What is clear that the Dalai Lama has never sold arms to Israel, stationed troops in Saudi Arabia, sent military forces to fight for freedom in Afghanistan or Iraq, reconquered Spain from Islamic invasion, drawn cartoons mocking Islamic terrorists, dismantled the Ottoman Empire, or performed any of the other acts which the apologists for terrorism claim have “provoked” al Qaeda. Yet al Qaeda is still trying to kill him — as it trying to kill everyone who does not submit to it hideous totalitarian “religion.”

Ooo! That's goooood! Great article. Thanks for posting it.

15 posted on 04/05/2007 11:20:10 AM PDT by retrokitten
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To: IrishMike

BTTT


16 posted on 04/05/2007 3:06:40 PM PDT by neverdem (May you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows that you're dead.)
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To: neverdem

Any way, even if they were successful, he’d just be reborn in another place. Obviously a concept too hard for Islamics to understand.


17 posted on 04/05/2007 4:36:23 PM PDT by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: Natchez Hawk
Contracted out by Red China?

You and I are of one accord.

After 9-11, there was a Senate briefing, which was closed and confidential. The briefing detailed which nation state was involved in the catastrophe. The assumption was that it was Saudi Arabia.

I stated at the time that it was China, and I still believe that they are operating in some way wih Al Qaeda.

18 posted on 04/05/2007 4:36:31 PM PDT by happygrl
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To: IrishMike
Can an ethical follower of Tibetan Buddhism kill someone in order to save the Dalai Lama?

This is similar to a question posed in a timeworn story intended to instruct a neophyte student of Tibetan Buddhism as to what constitutes compassion and wisdom. The story goes; a student is walking with a realized Lama on some out of the way path. They are confronted by a madman who is intent on killing the Lama. Even the most green student of Buddhism is aware of the Buddha's instruction not to take life. What does the student do? The answer is; kill the madman.

Taking a human life is considered the most detrimental negative karma. Taking the life of a realized teacher, one's father or one's mother are considered a good deal more negative than the killing of other people. If you allow the madman to kill the teacher he will suffer for eons in a hell realm. The compassionate thing to do, for the madman, is to prevent him from creating that karma.

The classic "rabid dog story" is another one used to impart the same lesson. It is almost identical to the western version of "what do you do about a rabid dog?" except it is asked "what is the most compassionate act for the dog's sake?"

So the answer to the question in the article is an unequivocal "yes." And it also a good thing to defend ordinary beings too. If you have no intention of gain through wealth, fame or pleasure there is little or no karma.

19 posted on 04/05/2007 8:57:32 PM PDT by TigersEye (For Democrats; victory in Iraq is not an option!)
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To: IrishMike
The Dalai Lama has never supported armed resistance in Tibet.

That, along with a lot of historical points in this article, are highly questionable. The Dalai Lama did support armed resistance in Tibet until it was clear that it was a lost cause. Suicide is not good karma. Living to fight another day is as much wisdom to a Buddhist as it is to anyone else.

However, Mr. Kopel's main point is well taken. Tibetan Buddhism is in no way a suicide pact nor a philosophy of passivism.

20 posted on 04/05/2007 9:16:49 PM PDT by TigersEye (For Democrats; victory in Iraq is not an option!)
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To: sukhoi-30mki

And don’t forget the Gurkhas from Nepal, who serve in both the British & Indian Armies, Buddhist Warriors as well.


21 posted on 04/05/2007 9:21:52 PM PDT by hawkboy (Duncan Hunter '08!)
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To: sukhoi-30mki

And don’t forget the Gurkhas from Nepal, who serve in both the British & Indian Armies, Buddhist Warriors as well.


22 posted on 04/05/2007 9:21:53 PM PDT by hawkboy (Duncan Hunter '08!)
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To: hawkboy

Err,nope-the vast majority of Gurkhas are Hindus,like most Nepalese.


23 posted on 04/05/2007 9:35:40 PM PDT by sukhoi-30mki
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To: IrishMike
A right to self-defense is recognized by the Dalai Lama — indeed, his predecessor tried to recruit an army.

Richard Gere and his gerbil will be most distressed to hear this.

24 posted on 04/06/2007 2:00:02 AM PDT by pawdoggie
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To: IrishMike

Transcendence is never more relevant than for a soldier at war and fighting all the hardships of real hell.

Maybe someone wake the tree hugging special ed hyppies of our universities about this reality.


25 posted on 04/06/2007 2:02:52 AM PDT by JudgemAll (Condemn me, make me naked and kill me, or be silent for ever on my gun ownership and law enforcement)
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