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Cheney is Absolutely Correct
American Thinker ^ | April 09, 2007 | Ray Robison

Posted on 04/09/2007 10:58:18 AM PDT by neverdem

On the Rush Limbaugh radio program, VP Cheney restated his position that Saddam had ties to al Qaeda. The Vice President is completely correct. Specifically, he spoke of Abu Mus'ab al Zarqawi's presence in Iraq before the start of Operation Iraqi Freedom. As much as a year earlier, al Qaeda affiliated jihadists lead by Zarqawi began aggressive attacks on the Kurdish regions in the north of Iraq. Why would this committed jihadist leader bring his fighters to Iraq to attack Saddam's enemies?  


While researching for our new eBook Both In One Trench we realized that there seems to be a confluence of prominent terrorists emanating from Kuwait after it was occupied by Saddam's armies. Many of these men are of Palestinian ethnicity. The Palestinians living in Kuwait had favored Saddam because he was a prominent proponent of the Palestinian cause. Their allegiance to Saddam was so thorough that the Kuwaiti government kicked out its Palestinian population after liberation because they collaborated with Saddam. Saddam's support of Palestinian terrorism is incontrovertible.

A large number of these Palestinians, over a hundred thousand, made their way to Jordan where they began to radicalize the moderate Jordanian population. One of these Palestinians - part of the Palestinian migration from Kuwait which has been  termed the "returnees from Kuwait" - was Sheik Abu-Mohammed al-Maqdisi (or Isam Mohammad Taher al-Barqawi). He would later become a major al Qaeda leader.

Barqawi became the spiritual leader for the newly radicalized Jordanians like Abu Mus'ab Al Zarqawi. Zarqawi would organize a group of radicalized Jordanians and other "returnees from Kuwait" called tawhid, which would align itself with al Qaeda for the Millennium Plot (or before).

Barqawi, a Palestinian-Jordanian, a "returnee from Kuwait" sympathized with Saddam. Barqawi sent Zarqawi to Iraq with other Palestinian-Jordanian "returnees" to fight jihad against Saddam's enemies, not to fight Saddam. It may very well be that Zarqawi had no personal love for the Ba'athists. But Osama bin Laden himself has called for the jihadists in Iraq to work with the Ba'athists to defeat the Christian crusaders.  

A study  reported by the Middle East Media Research Institute explains what happened next:

 The Jihad fighters "related that Abu Mus'ab [Al-Zarqawi] used the experience of the [Iraqi] Ba'th[ists] in his war on the Americans and Iraqis, including regarding the security issue. [A man named] Ahmad clarified that this was particularly true regarding the city of Al-Fallujah, which contained hundreds of former Iraqi military intelligence officers with great experience in the security sphere.

According to one of Zarqawi's own followers, Zarqawi traveled to Iraq where he joined with Saddam's intelligence agents - with great experience - not new recruits but senior level intelligence officials, loyal men who would only have been there if they had been sent by Saddam.

The evidence of this alliance is the insurgency itself. The Iraqi government has many times tried to inform the American public that the leaders of the insurgency are Ba'athists working with al Qaeda. Such reports are ignored or criticized by the US media. Typically, the US media trots out a retired, senior CIA official who made rank under President Clinton to deny these reports because they don't want the American public to know that Ba'athists and Islamic terrorists were working together before the start of Operation Iraqi Freedom. To acknowledge such a connection would be to demonstrate that certain intelligence officials who said that this type of combined operation could not happen - in fact made careers off the theory after the 1993 WTC attack - were wrong.

Some time after the Saddam regime fell and Zarqawi began to slaughter Iraqis, Barqawi (Maqdisi) got cold feet. He tried to rein-in Zarqawi which caused a split in the Palestinian-Jordanian branch of al Qaeda. In late 2004, Zarqawi distanced himself from the Jordanian branch of al Qaeda by swearing allegiance directly to al Qaeda. In other words, he quit the Barqawi branch of al Qaeda and went to the Ayman al Zawahiri branch because he still needed jihad recruits to fight in Iraq.

Upon breaking away from his mentor, he began to set himself up as the Islamic authority in Iraq (the pupil became the teacher). Those Iraqi intelligence agents who had worked with him since before OIF had themselves become radicalized, realized the Ba'athist regime wasn't coming back, and began to swear loyalty to Zarqawi. Thus, Zarkawi, who had come to Iraq to support the Saddam regime would abandon his directives from his mentor and attempt to take direct control of Iraq.

But why would Saddam send senior IIS agents to work with jihadists? Because they were already working with Islamic jihadists long before the start of OIF. This Dar al Hayat article, "The Resistance In The "Sunni Triangle",  makes clear that because the Iraqi economy was strangled by UN sanctions. Saddam's senior military officials, many of them with land grants in Fallujah - where Zarqawi teamed up with them - had smuggled oil in cooperation with Islamic extremists. These Islamic extremists were joined to Anbar province by religious and tribal affiliation.

These extremists, already living under the radar in places like Jordan, were the perfect smuggling partners. Thus, as the sanctions dragged on, senior Iraqi military leaders and even a few close advisors to Saddam began to adhere to the extremists' Islamic teachings. Initially, Saddam tried to shut it down. But because these Iraqi officials were Saddam's support base, he eventually had to come to terms with them to protect his power. These Islamic extremists and smugglers were from places like the Palestinian "returnee" camps in Jordan. They were feeding Saddam's support base.

Our research points to these Palestinian-Jordanian "returnees" as one of many portals of influence between Saddam and the global Islamic jihad movement. Other portals of influence to the movement include Gulbuddin Hekmatyar (Islamic Party) and Mulla Omar (Taliban) in Afghanistan, Maulana Fazlur Rahman and his jihad political parties in Pakistan, Hassan al Turabi and his National Islamic Front followers in Sudan, and Ayman al Zawahiri himself with the Egyptian Islamic Jihad, and later when it became al Qaeda along with Bin Laden's followers.

To not see the portals means averting the eyes. Too many people who should know better have done so.

Ray Robison is co-author of the forthcoming book Both in One Trench, and a frequent contributor to American Thinker.

Page Printed from: http://www.americanthinker.com/2007/04/cheney_is_absolutely_correct.html at April 09, 2007 - 01:51:37 PM EDT


TOPICS: Editorial; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: alqaeda; cheney; saddam

1 posted on 04/09/2007 10:58:20 AM PDT by neverdem
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To: neverdem

Cheney asserts Iraq-al Qaeda link ~ on radio show: “They were present before we invaded Iraq.”
BBC ^ | Friday, 6 April 2007, 16:11 GMT 17:11 UK | BBC Staff
Posted on 04/06/2007 1:54:47 PM EDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1813198/posts

See especially:
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1813198/posts?page=39#39
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1813198/posts?page=42#42

*

Last July (2006):
Anti-Bush Pentagon officials leak military secrets to Iran
FrontPageMag.com ^ | July 2, 2006 | David Horowitz
Posted on 07/02/2006 9:04:33 PM EDT by Eagle9
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1659503/posts

*
Last April 2006:
http://www.japantoday.com/us/bbs/msg/shibumi/p7 [all posts by shibumi/p7]

Report raises new questions on Bush, WMDs
hate to cut, paste and run, but...
shibumi Click here to see member profile (Apr 17 2006 - 20:27) Rate Post | Report

This just in from Mr. Hitchens:

Clueless Joe Wilson
How did the CIA’s special envoy miss Zahawie’s trip to Niger?
By Christopher Hitchens
Posted Monday, April 17, 2006, at 3:14 PM ET

http://www.slate.com/id/2140058/

Nobody appears to dispute what I wrote in last week’s Slate
:
http://www.slate.com/id/2139609/?nav/fo/

to the effect that in February 1999, Saddam Hussein dispatched his former envoy to the International Atomic Energy Agency, and former delegate to non-proliferation conferences at the United Nations, to Niger. Wissam al-Zahawie was, at the time of his visit, the accredited ambassador of Iraq to the Vatican: a more senior post than it may sound, given that the Vatican was almost the only full European embassy that Iraq then possessed. And nobody has proposed an answer to my question: Given the fact that Niger is synonymous with uranium (and was Iraq’s source of “yellowcake”
:
http://www.slate.com/id/2085848/

in 1981), and given that Zahawie had been Iraq’s main man in nuclear diplomacy, what innocent explanation can be found for his trip?

The person whose response I most wanted is Ambassador Joseph Wilson
:
http://www.slate.com/id/2122963/

, who has claimed to discover that Saddam was guiltless on the charge of seeking uranium from Niger, and has further claimed to be the object, along with his CIA wife, of a campaign of government persecution. On Keith Olbermann’s show on April 10, Wilson was asked about my article and about Zahawie.....

Sounds damning, and if that was the only report on the trailers, it certainly would be. What the Post neglects to mention in its sensationalist zeal is that this was one of several teams that investigated the trailers, and the totality of their evaluations came to a different conclusion that that of the leakers who supplied this story. Skip down to the 12th paragraph, which is when Joby Warrick finally gets around to providing the context:

Intelligence analysts involved in high-level discussions about the trailers noted that the technical team was among several groups that analyzed the suspected mobile labs throughout the spring and summer of 2003. Two teams of military experts who viewed the trailers soon after their discovery concluded that the facilities were weapons labs, a finding that strongly influenced views of intelligence officials in Washington, the analysts said. “It was hotly debated, and there were experts making arguments on both sides,” said one former senior official who spoke on the condition that he not be identified.

http://www.captainsquartersblog.com/mt/archives/006736.php

Report raises new questions on Bush, WMDs
Report raises new questions on Bush, WMDs
shibumi Click here to see member profile (Apr 16 2006 - 21:52) Rate Post | Report

Let’s get back on topic, shall we?

More Deception From “Good Morning America”:

“...the Washington Post’s story this morning on the mobile biological weapons labs in Iraq was highly misleading. (The Post reported, as if it were an expose, that one team that was sent to examine the purported mobile labs reported that they were not intended to produce biological weapons. But buried deep in the Post’s story is the fact that three teams examined the trailers, and two of the three thought that they were indeed intended for bioweapon production.)...”
http://powerlineblog.com/archives/013742.php#013742

“....the Post conducts a propaganda campaign against the administration that’s based on distortion. The latest instance is today’s story on the Bush administration’s statements that certain Iraqi trailers were biological laboratories. As Ed Morrissey shows:
http://www.captainsquartersblog.com/mt/archives/006736.php

, the Post’s report is highly deceptive. While trumpeting the fact that a team of experts concluded after the invasion that, contrary to the administration’s claim, the trailers were not bio labs, it does not reveal until a dozen paragraphs later that two other teams of experts reached a contrary conclusion. Thus, the view of the team that the Post highlights appears to have been a minority view at the time the administration referred to the trailers as bio labs.
http://powerlineblog.com/archives/013739.php#013739

about that “chickenhawk” argument...
shibumi Click here to see member profile (Apr 16 2006 - 12:08) Rate Post | Report

This is what the Left really thinks of people like Pat Tillman who join up and fight overseas:

http://www.ucomics.com/rallcom/2004/05/03/

...and this is what the Left thinks of those of us who don’t qualify for military service, but still want to do our part:
http://michellemalkin.com/archives/001957.htm

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2004/4/1/144156/3224

..and if you had any doubts as to whether the Left supports the troops, rest assured- they don’t:
http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/commentary/la-...

Report raises new questions on Bush, WMDs

More here: http://www.japantoday.com/us/bbs/msg/shibumi/p7


2 posted on 04/09/2007 11:03:42 AM PDT by Matchett-PI (To have no voice in the Party that always sides with America's enemies is a badge of honor.)
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To: Matchett-PI

ping


3 posted on 04/09/2007 11:04:48 AM PDT by Volunteer (Just so you know, I am ashamed the Dixie Chicks make records in Nashville.)
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To: neverdem
On the Rush Limbaugh radio program, VP Cheney restated his position that Saddam had ties to al Qaeda. The Vice President is completely correct.

Of course he's correct...the question is, why the hell didn't he/Bush/Rummy do more about it when the opportunity was there to elimnate Al Qaeda in Iraq? (i.e., why didn't we commit at least 500,000 more troops in the initial stages--if we had, IMHO, there would today be a Congress firmly in the hands of the GOP, a president riding a huge wave of popular support, and a rosy future for chances in the upcoming 2008 election).

4 posted on 04/09/2007 11:05:59 AM PDT by meandog (If it feels good, don't do it!)
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To: neverdem; All; jveritas
"On the Rush Limbaugh radio program, VP Cheney restated his position that Saddam had ties to al Qaeda."

Arrrrrrrrrrgggghhhhhh!!!

Cheney did NOT state anything about Saddam and al-Qaeda on the Limbaugh show and has never said Saddam was tied into 9/11. Whomever the "American Thinker" is they were duped by misleading headlines from the AP and didn't actually read the article nor the actual transcript.

What Cheney did state is that Abu Musab al-Zarqawi was in Iraq before the start of the war. And it is well known by now that Abu Musab al-Zarqawi fled to Iraq, along with other members of al-Qaeda, after Afghanistan fell.

Interview with Vice President Richard B. Cheney

5 posted on 04/09/2007 11:09:31 AM PDT by avacado
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To: Matchett-PI

Bump


6 posted on 04/09/2007 11:10:25 AM PDT by swmobuffalo (The only good terrorist is a dead terrorist.)
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To: meandog

500,000 was greater than the active duty U.S. Army.


7 posted on 04/09/2007 11:12:29 AM PDT by neverdem (May you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows that you're dead.)
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To: meandog

I’m not going to totally justify the number of troops deployed during the invasion, but don’t forget that we wanted to deploy an additional Division for northern/central Iraq (where it would have made great effects on Al-Qaeda and Sunni/Baathist Terrorist, which was thwarted by backstabbing Turkey, whose parlament didn’t gave enough votes to allow an American invasion into Iraq from the north. Anti-American tensions rose high in Turkey, largely due to their anxiety of an Independent Kurdistan in Iraq.


8 posted on 04/09/2007 11:13:13 AM PDT by SolidWood (Islam is an insanity cult that makes everyone act Arab)
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To: avacado
Arrrrrrrrrrgggghhhhhh!!!

Man you said it. The Al Queda/Saddam/911 thing is like saying all Germans were Nazis.

9 posted on 04/09/2007 11:23:01 AM PDT by BallyBill (Serial Hit-N-Run poster)
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To: BallyBill

It’s maddening. Anytime Cheney mentions al-Qaeda and Iraq the MSM twists it to say that Cheney is tying Saddam and al-Qaeda together.


10 posted on 04/09/2007 11:26:03 AM PDT by avacado
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To: neverdem
Note to mainstream media idiots: The fact that Saddam had ties to al-Qaeda is NOT THE SAME as claiming that Saddam was behind the 9/11 attacks.

Nobody in the Administration ever claimed that Saddam or Iraq were behind the 9/11 attacks specifically. The Administration said that in light of the 9/11 attacks, it was no longer acceptable to have a rogue state like Iraq with access to weapons of mass destruction and ties to terrorist organizations such as al-Qaeda.

11 posted on 04/09/2007 11:26:43 AM PDT by Yo-Yo (USAF, TAC, 12th AF, 366 TFW, 366 MG, 366 CRS, Mtn Home AFB, 1978-81)
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To: neverdem
Great work, but I’m afraid this doesn’t fit the MSM template and must be muscled aside by the no-connection-between-Saddam-and-al-Qaeda-big-lie.
12 posted on 04/09/2007 11:27:32 AM PDT by Stultis (I don't worry about the war turning into "Vietnam" in Iraq; I worry about it doing so in Congress.)
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To: neverdem

bttt


13 posted on 04/09/2007 11:37:27 AM PDT by Christian4Bush (Dennis Miller said it best “Liberals always feel your pain. Unless of course, they caused it.”)
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To: neverdem

Big Time!


14 posted on 04/09/2007 11:43:36 AM PDT by NonValueAdded (Prevent Glo-Ball Warming ... turn out the sun when not in use)
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To: neverdem

ping


15 posted on 04/09/2007 11:44:18 AM PDT by phs3 (If you call a terrorist a freedom fighter, I call you the enemy.)
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To: meandog

“..the question is, why the hell didn’t he/Bush/Rummy do more about it when the opportunity was there to elimnate Al Qaeda in Iraq? (i.e., why didn’t we commit at least 500,000 more troops in the initial stages—if we had, IMHO, there would today be a Congress firmly in the hands of the GOP, a president riding a huge wave of popular support, and a rosy future for chances in the upcoming 2008 election).” ~ meandog

NRO - April 2004:

Rumsfeld’s War, Powell’s Occupation (April, 2004 NRO article)
National Review Online ^ | April 30, 2004 | Barbara Lerner
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1616782/posts

Rumsfeld wanted Iraqis in on the action ­ right from the beginning.

The latest post-hoc conventional wisdom on Iraq is that Defense Secretary Rumsfeld won the war but lost the occupation. There are two problems with this analysis (which comes, most forcefully, from The Weekly Standard). First, it’s not Rumsfeld’s occupation; it’s Colin Powell’s and George Tenet’s. Second, although it’s painfully obvious that much is wrong with this occupation, it’s simple-minded to assume that more troops will fix it. More troops may be needed now, but more of the same will not do the job. Something different is needed ­ and was, right from the start.

A Rumsfeld occupation would have been different, and still might be. Rumsfeld wanted to put an Iraqi face on everything at the outset ­ not just on the occupation of Iraq, but on its liberation too. That would have made a world of difference.

Rumsfeld’s plan was to train and equip ­ and then transport to Iraq ­ some 10,000 Shia and Sunni freedom fighters led by Shia exile leader Ahmed Chalabi and his cohorts in the INC, the multi-ethnic anti-Saddam coalition he created. There, they would have joined with thousands of experienced Kurdish freedom fighters, ably led, politically and militarily, by Jalal Talabani and Massoud Barzani. Working with our special forces, this trio would have sprung into action at the start of the war, striking from the north, helping to drive Baathist thugs from power, and joining Coalition forces in the liberation of Baghdad. That would have put a proud, victorious, multi-ethnic Iraqi face on the overthrow of Saddam Hussein, and it would have given enormous prestige to three stubbornly independent and unashamedly pro-American Iraqi freedom fighters: Chalabi, Talabani, and Barzani.

Jay Garner, the retired American general Rumsfeld chose to head the civilian administration of the new Iraq, planned to capitalize on that prestige immediately by appointing all three, along with six others, to head up Iraq’s new transitional government. He planned to cede power to them in a matter of weeks ­ not months or years ­ and was confident that they would work with him, not against him, because two of them already had. General Garner, after all, is the man who headed the successful humanitarian rescue mission that saved the Kurds in the disastrous aftermath of Gulf War I, after the State Department-CIA crowd and like thinkers in the first Bush administration betrayed them. Kurds are not a small minority ­ and they remember. The hero’s welcome they gave General Garner when he returned to Iraq last April made that crystal clear.

Finally, Secretary Rumsfeld wanted to cut way down on the infiltration of Syrian and Iranian agents and their foreign terrorist recruits, not just by trying to catch them at the border ­ a losing game, given the length of those borders ­ but by pursuing them across the border into Syria to strike hard at both the terrorists and their Syrian sponsors, a move that would have forced Iran as well as Syria to reconsider the price of trying to sabotage the reconstruction of Iraq.

None of this happened, however, because State and CIA fought against Rumsfeld’s plans every step of the way. Instead of bringing a liberating Shia and Sunni force of 10,000 to Iraq, the Pentagon was only allowed to fly in a few hundred INC men. General Garner was unceremoniously dumped after only three weeks on the job, and permission for our military to pursue infiltrators across the border into Syria was denied.

General Garner was replaced by L. Paul Bremer, a State Department man who kept most of the power in his own hands and diluted what little power Chalabi, Talabani, and Barzani had by appointing not six but 22 other Iraqis to share power with them. This resulted in a rapidly rotating 25-man queen-for-a-day-type leadership that turned the Iraqi Governing Council into a faceless mass, leaving Bremer’s face as the only one most Iraqis saw.

By including fence-sitters and hostile elements as well as American friends in his big, unwieldy IGC and giving them all equal weight, Bremer hoped to display a kind of inclusive, above-it-all neutrality that would win over hostile segments of Iraqi society and convince them that a fully representative Iraqi democracy would emerge. But Iraqis didn’t see it that way. Many saw a foreign occupation of potentially endless length, led by the sort of Americans who can’t be trusted to back up their friends or punish their enemies. Iraqis saw, too, that Syria and Iran had no and were busily entrenching their agents and terrorist recruits into Iraqi society to organize, fund, and equip Sunni bitter-enders like those now terrorizing Fallujah and Shiite thugs like Moqtada al Sadr, the man who is holding hostage the holy city of Najaf.

Despite all the crippling disadvantages it labored under, Bremer’s IGC managed to do some genuine good by writing a worthy constitution, but the inability of this group to govern-period, let alone in time for the promised June 30 handover ­ finally became so clear that Bremer and his backers at State and the CIA were forced to recognize it. Their last minute “solution” is to dump the Governing Council altogether, and give U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan’s special envoy, Lakhdar Brahimi, the power to appoint a new interim government. The hope is that U.N. sponsorship will do two big things: 1) give the Brahimi government greater legitimacy in the eyes of the Iraqi people; and 2) convince former allies to join us and reinforce our troops in Iraq in some significant way. These are vain hopes.

Putting a U.N. stamp on an Iraqi government will delegitimize it in the eyes of most Iraqis and do great damage to those who are actively striving to create a freer, more progressive Middle East. Iraqis may distrust us, but they have good reason to despise the U.N., and they do. For 30 years, the U.N. ignored their torments and embraced their tormentor, focusing obsessively on a handful of Palestinians instead. Then, when Saddam’s misrule reduced them to begging for food and medicine, they saw U.N. fat cats rip off the Oil-for-Food Program money that was supposed to save them.

The U.N. as a whole is bad; Lakhdar Brahimi is worse. A long-time Algerian and Arab League diplomat, he is the very embodiment of all the destructive old policies foisted on the U.N. by unreformed Arab tyrants, and he lost no time in making that plain. In his first press conferences, he emphasized three points: Chalabi, Talabani, and Barzani will have no place in a government he appoints; he will condemn American military action to restore order in Iraq; and he will be an energetic promoter of the old Arab excuses ­ Israel’s “poison in the region,” he announced, is the reason it’s so hard to create a viable Iraqi interim government.

Men like Chalabi, Talabani, and Barzani have nothing but contempt for Mr. Brahimi, the U.N., and old Europe. They know perfectly well who their real enemies are, and they understand that only decisive military action against them can create the kind of order that is a necessary precondition for freedom and democracy. They see, as our State Department Arabists do not, that we will never be loved, in Iraq or anywhere else in the Middle East, until we are respected, and that the month we have wasted negotiating with the butchers of Fallujah has earned us only contempt, frightening our friends and encouraging our mortal enemies.

The damage Brahimi will do to the hope of a new day in Iraq and in the Middle East is so profound that it would not be worth it even if empowering him would bring in a division of French troops to reinforce ours in Iraq. In fact, it will do no such thing. Behind all the bluster and moral preening, the plain truth is that the French have starved their military to feed their bloated, top-heavy welfare state for decades. They couldn’t send a division like the one the Brits sent, even if they wanted to (they don’t). Belgium doesn’t want to help us either, nor Spain, nor Russia, because these countries are not interested in fighting to create a new Middle East. They’re fighting to make the most advantageous deals they can with the old Middle East, seeking to gain advantages at our expense, and at the expense of the oppressed in Iraq, Iran, and every other Middle Eastern country where people are struggling to throw off the shackles of Islamofascist oppression.

It is not yet too late for us to recognize these facts and act on them by dismissing Brahimi, putting Secretary Rumsfeld and our Iraqi friends fully in charge at last, and unleashing our Marines to make an example of Fallujah. And when al Jazeera screams “massacre,” instead of cringing and apologizing, we need to stand tall and proud and tell the world: Lynch mobs like the one that slaughtered four Americans will not be tolerated. Order will restored, and Iraqis who side with us will be protected and rewarded.

­ Barbara Lerner is a frequent contributor to NRO.

7 posted on 11/02/2006 9:10:53 AM EST by Matchett-PI (To have no voice in the Party that always sides with America’s enemies is a badge of honor.)
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1730632/posts?page=7#7

Rumsfeld’s Prophecy Has Come True
By Cal Thomas October 26, 2006
http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2006/10/rumsfelds_prophecy_has_come_tr.html

At lunch Monday with a small group of columnists, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld handed us a speech he’d delivered in 1984 on the occasion of his receiving the George Catlett Marshall Medal.

It was Oct. 17, three weeks before a critical election that would give Ronald Reagan an overwhelming electoral victory. It was also a time when voices in the media and Democratic Party were calling for the United States not to introduce Pershing II missiles into Western Europe to counter missiles the Soviet Union had placed in Eastern Europe. The left wanted an accommodation with Soviet dictator Mikhail Gorbachev. Reagan believed in victory over communism, and the collapse of the Berlin Wall and the liberation of the Soviet bloc nations is testimony to his sound judgment.

Even before those exciting events, Rumsfeld saw another threat coming in as the tide of Soviet communism rolled out. He spoke of terrorism. Remember, this was 1984, 17 years before 9/11 at a time when most of the world thought terrorism was an isolated phenomenon confined mainly to Israel.

“Terrorism is growing,” Rumsfeld said then. “In the 30 days ending last week, it is estimated that there were 37 terrorist attacks, by 13 different organizations, against the property or citizens of 20 different countries.”

Even then, Rumsfeld noted terrorism is “state-sponsored, by nations using it as a central element of their foreign policy... terrorism has a home.”

He said terrorism works because even a single attack by a small and weak nation can influence public opinion and lower morale and can “alter the behavior of great nations.” Isn’t that precisely what is happening now? As the terrorists watch the American electorate grow tired and frustrated with the war against insurgent terrorists in Iraq, do they not think all they have to do is hold out a little longer and America will sign anything and do anything to preserve the lives of its people? Why should they believe anything else?

Using a justification for fighting terrorism that would resurface in the current war, Rumsfeld said, “Terrorism is a form of warfare and must be treated as such... weakness invites aggression. Simply standing in a defensive position, absorbing blows, is not enough. Terrorism must be deterred.”

In his 1984 speech, Rumsfeld said terrorism cannot be eliminated, but it can be made to function at a “low level” that will allow governments to function. He repeated that thought at lunch and added that the United States is somewhat at a disadvantage because the terrorists don’t have a media that challenges their policies, they have no hierarchy and they “get to lie every day with no accountability.” Speculating again about the future, Rumsfeld said, “there will be no conventional wars in the near future and no way the military can win or lose a war.”

I asked him what he meant. He replied, “We’re socialized into believing the American military can go find somebody and kick the hell out of them, or find a battleship to sink, or an air force to shoot down. You can’t do that in the 21st century.”

Noting the length of the Cold War, Gen. Peter Pace, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff - who was also at the luncheon - agreed the terrorists can be deterred “if the American people will just give us the time.”

Later that day, I spoke with Haley Barbour, Mississippi governor and former Republican National Committee chairman, about the apparently slim GOP prospects in the coming election. Noting how the polls show Iraq has hurt Republicans, Barbour said, “The public gets tired of long wars.”

That is precisely what Osama bin Laden and his bloody associates are counting on. Their plan for victory is to exhaust the United States.

In 1984, Rumsfeld recalled Winston Churchill’s lesson from World War II that weakness invites aggression. And he warned, “Ours is a dangerous world, a world in transition.”

We have now transitioned from dangerous to even more dangerous. If we grow weary in this battle, we can be sure our enemies won’t flag. They are prepared for a long war. We’d better be, for to be unprepared and to lack resolve means the war will come anyway, but with greater intensity and with more American (and European) casualties.

Cal@CalThomas.com

8 posted on 11/02/2006 10:02:36 AM EST by Matchett-PI (To have no voice in the Party that always sides with America’s enemies is a badge of honor.)
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1730632/posts?page=8#8


16 posted on 04/09/2007 11:54:27 AM PDT by Matchett-PI (To have no voice in the Party that always sides with America's enemies is a badge of honor.)
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To: neverdem

ping


17 posted on 04/09/2007 12:03:53 PM PDT by Para-Ord.45
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To: avacado

Cheney sure as hell *did* state that Zarqawi was in Baghdad organizing al-Qaeda operations there before we arrived.

He could not have done that without tacit approval from Saddam.


18 posted on 04/09/2007 12:33:25 PM PDT by bw17
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To: BallyBill

Not even a remotely similar analogy.


19 posted on 04/09/2007 12:34:20 PM PDT by bw17
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To: neverdem

I am going to bookmark this thread...you have put in a lot of important links.

Thanks for posting that article..and the links.


20 posted on 04/09/2007 12:44:02 PM PDT by Txsleuth (Dorky Gigglelips)
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To: bw17
Cheney sure as hell *did* state that Zarqawi was in Baghdad organizing al-Qaeda operations there before we arrived.

Go back and read what I wrote. You are saying exactly what I was saying that Cheney was saying.

21 posted on 04/09/2007 1:01:50 PM PDT by avacado
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To: Txsleuth; Matchett-PI
Thanks for posting that article..and the links.

Give credit where credit is due. You can thank Matchett-PI for the bulk of the links.

22 posted on 04/09/2007 2:17:38 PM PDT by neverdem (May you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows that you're dead.)
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To: neverdem
"he spoke of Abu Mus'ab al Zarqawi's presence in Iraq before the start of Operation Iraqi Freedom. "

......but left out that Zarqawi was treated at Baghdad's Olympic Hospital, a facility reserved for high-ranking Ba'athists and their families. It's like saying if Zarqawi went to the US and got treated at Bethesda Naval Hospital, it doesn't mean that the US government was involved.

23 posted on 04/09/2007 2:26:22 PM PDT by cookcounty (No journalist ever won a prize for reporting facts. --Telling big stories? Now that's a winner.)
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To: neverdem; Matchett-PI

Thank you for the links, Matchett!!

I am bookmarking this..it is all important stuff to have on hand.

Great work.


24 posted on 04/09/2007 2:55:56 PM PDT by Txsleuth (Dorky Gigglelips)
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To: Txsleuth

You’re welcome! :)


25 posted on 04/09/2007 3:25:01 PM PDT by Matchett-PI (To have no voice in the Party that always sides with America's enemies is a badge of honor.)
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To: avacado

Sorry, I was feeling argumentative today and felt like arguing with someone even if they agreed with me.

;-)


26 posted on 04/09/2007 3:31:49 PM PDT by bw17
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To: bw17

LOL!!! Good answer!


27 posted on 04/09/2007 7:28:09 PM PDT by avacado
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To: Matchett-PI
Rumsfeld wanted Iraqis in on the action ­ right from the beginning.

LOL...if you go back and do some research you'll learn that he stated in a many newscast that, as the Iraqi officer cadre was comprised of mainly Saddam loyalist revolutionary guards that it had to be a coalition thrust...

The latest post-hoc conventional wisdom on Iraq is that Defense Secretary Rumsfeld won the war but lost the occupation. There are two problems with this analysis (which comes, most forcefully, from The Weekly Standard). First, it’s not Rumsfeld’s occupation; it’s Colin Powell’s and George Tenet’s. Second, although it’s painfully obvious that much is wrong with this occupation, it’s simple-minded to assume that more troops will fix it. More troops may be needed now, but more of the same will not do the job. Something different is needed ­ and was, right from the start.

George Tenent? Colin Powell? ... how about Bremmer, Wolfowitz, Perle and Cheney "they'll welcome us as heroes!" A bigger troop level (surge) IS working in Iraq--you're just not hearing about it!

A Rumsfeld occupation would have been different, and still might be. Rumsfeld wanted to put an Iraqi face on everything at the outset ­ not just on the occupation of Iraq, but on its liberation too. That would have made a world of difference.

Okay, it that argument is true, then who's responsible for not implementing the Rumsfeld plan? Bush? Cheney? (Powell was gone after 2004)

Rumsfeld’s plan was to train and equip ­ and then transport to Iraq ­ some 10,000 Shia and Sunni freedom fighters led by Shia exile leader Ahmed Chalabi and his cohorts in the INC, the multi-ethnic anti-Saddam coalition he created. There, they would have joined with thousands of experienced Kurdish freedom fighters, ably led, politically and militarily, by Jalal Talabani and Massoud Barzani. Working with our special forces, this trio would have sprung into action at the start of the war, striking from the north, helping to drive Baathist thugs from power, and joining Coalition forces in the liberation of Baghdad. That would have put a proud, victorious, multi-ethnic Iraqi face on the overthrow of Saddam Hussein, and it would have given enormous prestige to three stubbornly independent and unashamedly pro-American Iraqi freedom fighters: Chalabi, Talabani, and Barzani.

So I suppose blame for the president for the foul up is justified (as the American electorate did in the last election)?

28 posted on 04/10/2007 6:14:25 AM PDT by meandog (If it feels good, don't do it!)
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