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2010 Census Goes High Tech With Data-Only HTC'Census' GPS Smartphone (Geek&Re-Districting Alert)
http://www.intomobile.com/2007/04/04/2010-census-goes-high-tech-with-data-only-htc-census-gps-smartp ^ | April 4, 2007 | Will Park

Posted on 05/02/2007 2:25:32 PM PDT by longtermmemmory

HTC CensusWell folks, it looks like the U.S. Census Bureau is finally getting high-tech for their 2010 census. With $600 million poured into the Field Data Collection Automation (FDCA) project, half a million (500,000) field enumerators will be getting hooked up with a HTC Census smartphone. Armed with an EVDO data-only Windows Mobile 5.0 Pocket PC, and integrated GPS, the enumerator's job of collecting absentee census information will get nice and streamlined. As a high-tech plus, the built-in GPS unit also keeps the enumerator honest.

Back in 2000, I was actually a census enumerator. My job consisted of driving to households to gather the census information that they forgot or neglected to mail back. In my day, enumerators used paper forms to write in the information, and we often lied about mis-reported the number of hours we worked and the mileage that we racked up. I remember thinking that there had to be a better way to do this.

And here it is! The HTC Census just earned FCC approval and is planned to go live on Sprint's CDMA network with EV-DO data. The Census runs an Intel Bulverde 416MHz CPU with a Sirf Star III GSC3LTi GPS chipset, and integrated fingerprint reader. The specs are pretty impressive, but without voice capability this thing is really just a glorified PDA, not a smartphone.

With the HTC Census' GPS chip, Big Brother is gonna be putting the kibosh on mis-reporting and inaccurate data for the 2010 U.S. Census. It's too bad that this batch of enumerators won't be getting paid for any 'extra' hours or mileage.


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: 2010; census; district; election; eletions; fraud; healthypeople; healthypeople2010; ibm; redistricting; tech; verichip
I think this is SUPER interesting considering the amount of fraud that occurs. It will mean when those democrats MASS register those homeless people, every registration will have GPS data.

This would be good to mandate for those who do VOTER registration. No more Dashel style bulk absentee ballot requests.

1 posted on 05/02/2007 2:25:37 PM PDT by longtermmemmory
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To: longtermmemmory

I was part of the final contractor selection for this project - hopefully it will work, Harris had a good unit that actually worked, and seemed to know what they were doing, as opposed to their competitors.


2 posted on 05/02/2007 2:38:59 PM PDT by Strategerist
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To: longtermmemmory

Are they still going to try to guesstimate about the number of missed people (specifically minorities)?


3 posted on 05/02/2007 2:51:47 PM PDT by weegee (Libs want us to learn to live with terrorism, but if a gun is used they want to rewrite the Const.)
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To: longtermmemmory
Never forget the past.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4040930009676933149
IBM and the Holocaust

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/index.html
Research is all there for the reading.

Only after Jews were identified -- a massive and complex task that Hitler wanted done immediately -- could they be targeted for efficient asset confiscation, ghettoization, deportation, enslaved labor, and, ultimately, annihilation. It was a cross-tabulation and organizational challenge so monumental, it called for a computer. Of course, in the 1930s no computer existed.

But IBM's Hollerith punch card technology did exist. Aided by the company's custom-designed and constantly updated Hollerith systems, Hitler was able to automate his persecution of the Jews. Historians have always been amazed at the speed and accuracy with which the Nazis were able to identify and locate European Jewry. Until now, the pieces of this puzzle have never been fully assembled. The fact is, IBM technology was used to organize nearly everything in Germany and then Nazi Europe, from the identification of the Jews in censuses, registrations, and ancestral tracing programs to the running of railroads and organizing of concentration camp slave labor.

IBM and its German subsidiary custom-designed complex solutions, one by one, anticipating the Reich's needs. They did not merely sell the machines and walk away. Instead, IBM leased these machines for high fees and became the sole source of the billions of punch cards Hitler needed.


IBM's Hollerith punch card IBM's subsidiary, Dehomag in Berlin, Germany

-------------------------------------------------------

Today's Identification brought to you by IBM and Verichip:

Press Release

VeriChip Corporation's VeriMed(TM) Medical Solution Is Now Integrated Into the Hospital Demonstration Area of the IBM Solutions Experience Lab Located in Austin, Texas

DELRAY BEACH, Fla.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Sept. 8, 2005--VeriChip Corporation, a subsidiary of Applied Digital (NASDAQ: ADSX), a leading provider of identification and security technology, announced today that its implantable RFID healthcare system, VeriMed(TM), is now a component of the Hospital demonstration area of the IBM Solutions Experience Lab located in Austin, Texas. The IBM Solutions Experience Lab conducts approximately 260 tours annually for corporations and government agencies wishing to see demonstrations of functional, integrated hardware and software solutions for specific market sectors. The Hospital area demonstrates currently available technologies compatible with IBM healthcare solutions that provide integrated, state-of-the-art capabilities in the healthcare environment.

The Hospital demonstration area illustrates the potential of VeriMed to enhance the IBM Aligned Clinical Environment Solution. This is an integrated solution designed to connect disparate healthcare information sources while also reducing costs. The solution enables data collection and manages integration and analysis of patient information. VeriChip Corporation Chief Executive Officer Kevin McLaughlin noted, "When integrated with IBM's Aligned Clinical Environment Solutions and systems provided by other IBM healthcare business partners, the VeriMed implantable RFID microchip and its related infrastructure provides the 'front-end' that practitioners need for automated, secure, accurate and rapid access to vital clinical information."

About VeriChip - "The First RFID Company for People" VeriChip is a subsidiary of Applied Digital and the only company to provide both implantable and wearable RFID identification and security solutions for people, their assets, and their environments. From the world's first and only FDA-cleared, human-implantable RFID microchip to the only patented active RFID tag with skin-sensing capabilities, VeriChip leads the way in next-generation RFID technologies. Today, over 4,000 installations worldwide in healthcare, security, industrial, and government markets benefit from both the protection and efficiencies provided by VeriChip systems. For more information on VeriChip, please visit www.verichipcorp.com.

About Applied Digital - "The Power of Identification Technology" Applied Digital develops innovative identification and security products for consumer, commercial, and government sectors worldwide.

The Company's unique and often proprietary products provide identification and security systems for people, animals, the food supply, government/military arena, and commercial assets. Included in this diversified product line are RFID applications, end-to-end food safety systems, GPS/Satellite communications, and telecomm and security infrastructure, positioning Applied Digital as the leader in identification technology. Applied Digital is the owner of a majority position in Digital Angel Corporation (AMEX: DOC).

Statements about the Company's future expectations, including future revenues and earnings, and all other statements in this press release other than historical facts are "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and as that term is defined in the Private Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties and are subject to change at any time, and the Company's actual results could differ materially from expected results. The Company undertakes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect subsequently occurring events or circumstances.

Contact: CEOcast, Inc. Investors: Ken Sgro, 212-732-4300 Direct Communications Group Media: John O. Procter, 202-772-2179
Source: VeriChip Corporation



4 posted on 05/02/2007 2:57:03 PM PDT by Calpernia (Breederville.com)
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To: Strategerist
integrated fingerprint reader.

Yeah right. Everyone finger printed? Why volunteer it.

5 posted on 05/02/2007 2:57:08 PM PDT by Orange1998
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To: pandoraou812

ping


6 posted on 05/02/2007 3:01:37 PM PDT by Calpernia (Breederville.com)
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To: Orange1998
integrated fingerprint reader.

The finger print reader is a security feature. It uses a fingerprint as a "password". This way only the person assigned the device can operate it.

7 posted on 05/02/2007 3:14:49 PM PDT by operation clinton cleanup
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To: Orange1998

As the other poster noted, the fingerprint reader is ONLY for the census worker. It’s so if the device is lost or stolen, nobody else can access the data or even turn it on.

They’re not going to be going around fingerprinting people :-).


8 posted on 05/02/2007 3:19:33 PM PDT by Strategerist
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To: longtermmemmory

If the Dems take the WH in ‘08, look for the census form to ask about how many and what types of guns you own, and whether you own reloading equipment as well.

Can’t make things too tough for ATF, dontcha know.


9 posted on 05/02/2007 3:28:32 PM PDT by Disambiguator
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To: Calpernia
IBM and its German subsidiary custom-designed complex solutions, one by one, anticipating the Reich's needs. They did not merely sell the machines and walk away. Instead, IBM leased these machines for high fees and became the sole source of the billions of punch cards Hitler needed.

True but misleading. IBM almost always leased, almost never sold, its tabulators. It also was the only possible source of punch cards. This wasn't something special for Hitler, it was IBM's general practice.

10 posted on 05/02/2007 3:52:57 PM PDT by JoeFromSidney (My book is out. Read excerpts at http://www.thejusticecooperative.com)
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To: Calpernia; Ultra Sonic 007; pissant

Does anyone remember the last census and how bent out of shape we all were because it was so invasive? I wonder what the next one will be like. Do you know who was the only ‘government’ rep to bother to stand up and say something about it?

Duncan Hunter.

HUNTER INTRODUCES CENSUS REFORM BILL

Washington, D.C. – Congressman Duncan Hunter (CA-52) introduced legislation in the House of Representatives today that will reform the census-taking procedure to become less invasive. Currently, the U.S. Census Bureau utilizes two types of questionnaires as a means of collecting information for their decennial count, a “short form” consisting of seven questions, and a “long form” consisting of 52 questions. Many have complained about the intrusiveness of the questions contained in the long form which is sent to approximately one in every six households.

“I have been contacted by many people who feel their privacy is being violated with the questions contained in the long form version,” said Hunter. “I have not heard one good explanation as to why the federal government needs to know how many bathrooms you have in your home, or what time you leave for work.”

Congressman Hunter’s legislation, the Common Sense Census Act of 2000, will require people to answer only the seven standardized questions contained in both the short and long form. Providing any additional information would become optional. The legislation also removes the $100 per question penalty for refusing to answer any non-standardized questions.

“This legislation will bring common sense back to the census process by returning it to its original purpose, to count,” stated Hunter. “If people would like to provide additional information, they can do so, but they shouldn’t be forced to pay a penalty if they don’t feel comfortable answering some of the questions.”

http://www.house.gov/hunter/news_prior_2006/censusreform.htm


11 posted on 05/02/2007 3:55:47 PM PDT by AuntB (" It takes more than walking across the border to be an American." Duncan Hunter)
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To: AuntB

Hunter....right again.


12 posted on 05/02/2007 4:01:07 PM PDT by pissant
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To: pissant

I keep looking for something to really tick me off at Hunter. Can’t find it.


13 posted on 05/02/2007 4:03:12 PM PDT by AuntB (" It takes more than walking across the border to be an American." Duncan Hunter)
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To: AuntB

He certainly ain’t perfect. But I have not seen a man since Reagan who is more qualified.


14 posted on 05/02/2007 4:08:20 PM PDT by pissant
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To: AuntB

The penalty is never enforced, actually.


15 posted on 05/02/2007 4:23:21 PM PDT by Strategerist
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To: AuntB
Does anyone remember the last census and how bent out of shape we all were because it was so invasive?

The total number of questions has actually been reduced for several decades.

16 posted on 05/02/2007 4:24:05 PM PDT by Strategerist
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To: AuntB
“I have not heard one good explanation as to why the federal government needs to know how many bathrooms you have in your home, or what time you leave for work.”

The latter goes into traffic analysis and road-building plans.

If you want your local road planning based on pure guesswork, be my guest.

17 posted on 05/02/2007 4:25:07 PM PDT by Strategerist
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To: Strategerist

Thanks for your permission.


18 posted on 05/02/2007 4:27:03 PM PDT by AuntB (" It takes more than walking across the border to be an American." Duncan Hunter)
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To: AuntB

Now that, I didn’t know.

Thank you.


19 posted on 05/02/2007 5:50:11 PM PDT by Calpernia (Breederville.com)
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To: JoeFromSidney

I don’t understand what is or was misleading.

IBM stated in the past that their office(s) were taken over by the Hitler regime. That statement shows they maintained control throughout the war.


20 posted on 05/02/2007 5:54:36 PM PDT by Calpernia (Breederville.com)
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To: Strategerist
I asked you a question on a similar thread about this a few days or so ago but perhaps you overlooked it.

Here it is again, with your statement in bold and mine in italics. I'd appreciate an answer since it will be one of the topics brought up for discussion very soon.

A lot of the information is used for school and local highway and road construction planning.

People have to sign up their kids for school, right? And the school can see with their own eyeballs how empty or full the classes are, or how many extra books they have, or how many they lack.

The city planners can see for themselves, while driving, what the condition of the roads are, how congested or dangerous they are, etc. They can ask cops and taxi drivers. Citizens calling in and complaining about a particular road or area provide the rest of the info.

Why should we spend our tax dollars to fund this government survey when the same answers can be found without it?

21 posted on 05/02/2007 6:04:40 PM PDT by Miztiki (The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of the fool to the left. Eccles. 10:4)
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To: weegee

I think that is the point of the GPS data tracking the survey entry.

This way if they enter 100 names at teh same location it will cause flags to pop up.


22 posted on 05/04/2007 7:31:34 AM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
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