Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Honeybee Die-Off Threatens Food Supply
AP ^ | May 03, 2007 | Seth Borenstein

Posted on 05/04/2007 1:15:21 AM PDT by Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit

BELTSVILLE, Md. -- Unless someone or something stops it soon, the mysterious killer that is wiping out many of the nation's honeybees could have a devastating effect on America's dinner plate, perhaps even reducing us to a glorified bread-and-water diet.

Honeybees don't just make honey; they pollinate more than 90 of the tastiest flowering crops we have. Among them: apples, nuts, avocados, soybeans, asparagus, broccoli, celery, squash and cucumbers. And lots of the really sweet and tart stuff, too, including citrus fruit, peaches, kiwi, cherries, blueberries, cranberries, strawberries, cantaloupe and other melons.

In fact, about one-third of the human diet comes from insect-pollinated plants, and the honeybee is responsible for 80 percent of that pollination, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Even cattle, which feed on alfalfa, depend on bees. So if the collapse worsens, we could end up being "stuck with grains and water," said Kevin Hackett, the national program leader for USDA's bee and pollination program.

"This is the biggest general threat to our food supply," Hackett said.

While not all scientists foresee a food crisis, noting that large-scale bee die-offs have happened before, this one seems particularly baffling and alarming.

U.S. beekeepers in the past few months have lost one-quarter of their colonies -- or about five times the normal winter losses -- because of what scientists have dubbed Colony Collapse Disorder. The problem started in November and seems to have spread to 27 states, with similar collapses reported in Brazil, Canada and parts of Europe.

Scientists are struggling to figure out what is killing the honeybees, and early results of a key study this week point to some kind of disease or parasite.

Even before this disorder struck, America's honeybees were in trouble. Their numbers were steadily shrinking, because their genes do not equip them to fight poisons and disease very well, and because their gregarious nature exposes them to ailments that afflict thousands of their close cousins.

"Quite frankly, the question is whether the bees can weather this perfect storm," Hackett said. "Do they have the resilience to bounce back? We'll know probably by the end of the summer."

Experts from Brazil and Europe have joined in the detective work at USDA's bee lab in suburban Washington. In recent weeks, Hackett briefed Vice President Cheney's office on the problem. Congress has held hearings on the matter.

"This crisis threatens to wipe out production of crops dependent on bees for pollination," Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns said in a statement.

A congressional study said honeybees add about $15 billion a year in value to our food supply.

Of the 17,000 species of bees that scientists know about, "honeybees are, for many reasons, the pollinator of choice for most North American crops," a National Academy of Sciences study said last year. They pollinate many types of plants, repeatedly visit the same plant, and recruit other honeybees to visit, too.

Pulitzer Prize-winning insect biologist E.O. Wilson of Harvard said the honeybee is nature's "workhorse -- and we took it for granted."

"We've hung our own future on a thread," Wilson, author of the book "The Creation: An Appeal to Save Life on Earth," told The Associated Press on Monday.

Beginning this past fall, beekeepers would open up their hives and find no workers, just newborn bees and the queen. Unlike past bee die-offs, where dead bees would be found near the hive, this time they just disappeared. The die-off takes just one to three weeks.

USDA's top bee scientist, Jeff Pettis, who is coordinating the detective work on this die-off, has more suspected causes than time, people and money to look into them.

The top suspects are a parasite, an unknown virus, some kind of bacteria, pesticides, or a one-two combination of the top four, with one weakening the honeybee and the second killing it.

A quick experiment with some of the devastated hives makes pesticides seem less likely. In the recent experiment, Pettis and colleagues irradiated some hard-hit hives and reintroduced new bee colonies. More bees thrived in the irradiated hives than in the non-irradiated ones, pointing toward some kind of disease or parasite that was killed by radiation.

The parasite hypothesis has history and some new findings to give it a boost: A mite practically wiped out the wild honeybee in the U.S. in the 1990s. And another new one-celled parasitic fungus was found last week in a tiny sample of dead bees by University of California San Francisco molecular biologist Joe DeRisi, who isolated the human SARS virus.

However, Pettis and others said while the parasite nosema ceranae may be a factor, it cannot be the sole cause. The fungus has been seen before, sometimes in colonies that were healthy.

Recently, scientists have begun to wonder if mankind is too dependent on honeybees. The scientific warning signs came in two reports last October.

First, the National Academy of Sciences said pollinators, especially America's honeybee, were under threat of collapse because of a variety of factors. Captive colonies in the United States shrank from 5.9 million in 1947 to 2.4 million in 2005.

Then, scientists finished mapping the honeybee genome and found that the insect did not have the normal complement of genes that take poisons out of their systems or many immune-disease-fighting genes. A fruitfly or a mosquito has twice the number of genes to fight toxins, University of Illinois entomologist May Berenbaum.

What the genome mapping revealed was "that honeybees may be peculiarly vulnerable to disease and toxins," Berenbaum said.

University of Montana bee expert Jerry Bromenshenk has surveyed more than 500 beekeepers and found that 38 percent of them had losses of 75 percent or more. A few weeks back, Bromenshenk was visiting California beekeepers and saw a hive that was thriving. Two days later, it had completely collapsed.

Yet Bromenshenk said, "I'm not ready to panic yet." He said he doesn't think a food crisis is looming.

Even though experts this year gave what's happening a new name and think this is a new type of die-off, it may have happened before.

Bromenshenk said cited die-offs in the 1960s and 1970s that sound somewhat the same. There were reports of something like this in the United States in spots in 2004, Pettis said. And Germany had something similar in 2004, said Peter Neumann, co-chairman of a 17-country European research group studying the problem.

"The problem is that everyone wants a simple answer," Pettis said. "And it may not be a simple answer."


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Extended News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: bees; environment; food; honeybees; science
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-65 next last
I love the last quote. Definitely tagline material.
1 posted on 05/04/2007 1:15:23 AM PDT by Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit
This is a serious problem, and probably deserves more attention that the more tenuous and less scientific tractability of global warming.

The irradiation test was clever, but the question remains, how could a bacteria/parasite be so widespread so suddenly? And why now?

In my garden this year I am seeing many bumble bees, a few shiny black wasps which are new, a few yellowjackets, but I do not believe I have seen a single honeybee yet.

2 posted on 05/04/2007 1:32:18 AM PDT by Lexinom (DH08/FT08)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Lexinom

It only seems to be happening in America, not elsewhere, which is at least a bit heartening. Given the global portion of US agricultural production, however, it is bad enough.


3 posted on 05/04/2007 1:39:11 AM PDT by Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit (Everyone wants a simple answer; but sometimes there isn't a simple answer)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit
"'The problem is that everyone wants a simple answer,' Pettis said. 'And it may not be a simple answer.'"

We need to get out and wiggle those plants and/or put fans on them in windless areas. ...need to get busy as bees. :-)


4 posted on 05/04/2007 1:40:17 AM PDT by familyop (Essayons (has-been))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit

You know, I remember a report on this about 6 or 7 years ago on CBN (Pat Robertson’s news station). Nice to see how long it takes the MSM to catch a news story.


5 posted on 05/04/2007 1:42:15 AM PDT by Bushwacker777
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit
"Even cattle, which feed on alfalfa, depend on bees. So if the collapse worsens, we could end up being 'stuck with grains and water,' said Kevin Hackett, the national program leader for USDA's bee and pollination program."

Alright, friends, that's bunk. I've worked with cattle. Alfalfa's a good legume, but it is not fed to most cattle--especially on dry western ranges.

I smell market propaganda. They're going to raise prices very high whether scarcities of bees becomes much of a problem or not. Keep your eyes on the fields next year. Take photos of the hayfields next month and the same time next year.

And BTW, the USDA has been very affected by larger feedlot corporates during recent years.
6 posted on 05/04/2007 1:46:31 AM PDT by familyop (Essayons (has-been))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit; Lexinom

If there are bees that are surviving this mystery, then that’s probably enough. It may be a slump now, but the ones which have survived(or “naturally selected”) are going to be the progenitors of the new colonies, and they will most probably be able to survive this onslaught.

Bees have been on earth for hundreds of millions of years. Methinks they’ve seen enough as a species, to be able to adapt to newer realities than most of us would think.


7 posted on 05/04/2007 2:02:59 AM PDT by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: familyop

Ping to #7.


8 posted on 05/04/2007 2:03:34 AM PDT by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: All

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1826963/posts?page=151#151


9 posted on 05/04/2007 2:07:51 AM PDT by Cindy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CarrotAndStick

...well said in your in comment #7. And each year, I see fields of high mountain wildflowers but no bees. Bees apparently prefer more oxygen and warmth. For a day or two around the beginning of what is summer for lowland people, the wind blows a visible coat of pollen onto everything. [Cough, sneeze.]


10 posted on 05/04/2007 2:18:09 AM PDT by familyop (Essayons (has-been))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: CarrotAndStick

Hey are you turning this into an Evo/Crevo thread. At least three of the Guppie candidates would be mad at you;0)


11 posted on 05/04/2007 2:39:43 AM PDT by Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit (Everyone wants a simple answer; but sometimes there isn't a simple answer)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit

Let’s put this scare story into perspective. Before Europeans came to America there were no honey bees here. Lots of other insects to pollinate but no honey bees, they were imported. Plants and trees managed just fine then and I imagine they will manage now. Besides hummingbirds, bumble bees and other insects, bats also help pollinate plants. Nature always has backups in the system. I don’t think America is going to starve anytime soon for lack of pollination.


12 posted on 05/04/2007 2:41:07 AM PDT by calex59
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit
The problem started in November and seems to have spread to 27 states, with similar collapses reported in Brazil, Canada and parts of Europe.
Some of our "experts" might want to look into the ties between muslims islam and honey

Have the terrorists found a very low tech means of hitting America's food supply by killing off our bees? And a look at the areas where they're being affected shows that these are areas that Islamists want to bring under Islamic rule...even Brazil.
adjusting tin foil hat...

13 posted on 05/04/2007 2:42:09 AM PDT by philman_36
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit
It only seems to be happening in America...

Also happening in UK according to an article I read w/in last 2-3 weeks.

14 posted on 05/04/2007 2:59:56 AM PDT by elli1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit

:)


15 posted on 05/04/2007 3:09:19 AM PDT by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit
""The problem is that everyone wants a simple answer," Pettis said. "And it may not be a simple answer."

Actually, the answer "is" simple. There was an article posted a few days back saying that the "massive honeybee dieoff" was caused by a poisonous (to bees) fungus. And no, I "don't" have a link, as it's not a topic of great interest.

It's a disease epidemic, and once it runs its course, the immune fraction will breed back. It'll probably turn out that the Africanized "killer bees" are immune.

I remember back in the 1960's, "Spanish moss" across the southern US was dying off in mass swatches, and the news drumbeat was that its demise was due to "air pollution", because moss obtains all its nutrients from the air (having no root system). Years later, they found that it was a disease epidemic, and today the moss has pretty much recovered.

16 posted on 05/04/2007 3:29:35 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog (The Hog of Steel-NRA)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: calex59

Thanks for the “common sense” info. Now if we could only extend this thought into global warming.


17 posted on 05/04/2007 3:40:40 AM PDT by baltoga
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit

Sounds like the Queens made the mistake of letting the workers Unionize...LOL.


18 posted on 05/04/2007 3:48:46 AM PDT by wastoute
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit

I am a beekeeper. This has happened before but back before the internet and instant news.

There may be a new pathogen, but so far it is just guessing. There is little common with those who lost bees.

Plus, it is hard to get a number from the team investigating this. The best number I have found is 25% of bees lost, but we lose 20% every winter, so we are not in a crisis. Some commercial beekeepers intentionally reduce their numbers by 50% every winter since it is easy to build back up in spring.

In Florida, it was reported that 2% of beekeepers were affected.

I know one of those who lost bees to CCD probably lost them to mites, not something new. Follow the money. Think disaster funds.

Almonds require over 1,000,000 colonies and they were all pollinated this spring.

When Tracheal mites hit back in the 80s we lost even more (some states up to 80%) and only the “green” crowd though it was the end of the world. Same here.


19 posted on 05/04/2007 3:49:56 AM PDT by KeyWest (Help stamp out taglines!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: familyop

A visible coat of pollen? That’s wild!


20 posted on 05/04/2007 3:50:39 AM PDT by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Lexinom

I was out fishing last week about 3 miles out in the gulf of Mexico a big ole honey bee was buzzing around for about 15 minutes before landing on the outboard it rested then took off heading west guess going to Mexico.


21 posted on 05/04/2007 3:58:29 AM PDT by bikerman (_ _ . /_ _ _ /_ . . / / . . . . / . / . _ . . / . _ _ . / / . . _ / . . . //)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Lexinom

I live in South Central Pennsylvania (still mostly rural farm country) and I have not seen as many honeybees this year as in years past. I have a flowering apple tree right now, with some bees tending to it, but there is nothing else going on in my yard and garden, not a bee in sight.


22 posted on 05/04/2007 4:00:35 AM PDT by Virginia Ridgerunner ("Si vis pacem para bellum")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit

No, I saw a report last week, that Taiwan or some other Asian country is experiencing bee die-offs as well. It’s global...


23 posted on 05/04/2007 4:01:38 AM PDT by Virginia Ridgerunner ("Si vis pacem para bellum")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: CarrotAndStick

Yes. Much of it comes from pines but also from the flowers. ...like a yellow dust all over.


24 posted on 05/04/2007 4:16:22 AM PDT by familyop
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: calex59
Let’s put this scare story into perspective. Before Europeans came to America there were no honey bees here. Lots of other insects to pollinate but no honey bees, they were imported. Plants and trees managed just fine then and I imagine they will manage now. Besides hummingbirds, bumble bees and other insects, bats also help pollinate plants. Nature always has backups in the system. I don’t think America is going to starve anytime soon for lack of pollination.

Thank you for putting this so eloquently. I've been trying to tell people this for a month now. And, FWIW, I've been seeing bees on the clover in my fields here in SE Tennessee.

25 posted on 05/04/2007 4:19:03 AM PDT by Thermalseeker (Just the facts, ma'am)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: familyop
…the wind blows a visible coat of pollen onto everything.

Yep - every morning my red car is a dull yellow/green.

26 posted on 05/04/2007 4:33:59 AM PDT by R. Scott (Humanity i love you because when you're hard up you pawn your Intelligence to buy a drink)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: KeyWest

Thanks for your post - it is the most informative that I’ve seen on this issue.


27 posted on 05/04/2007 4:35:12 AM PDT by Nephi (Open borders is the flip side of the free trade coin. It's time for Protectionism.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: familyop

There was a dramatic photo either last Spring or in 2005, showing a huge yellow-green cloud of pollen over an area of Alaska.

I have three big spruce trees bordering the front of my property. I use those Swiffer dusters that retain the dust and the ones used on my three-season porch, which is closest to the pines, are full of yellow-green pollen all Spring. It will coat the windshields of the cars, as well.

We are both allergic to it.

Regarding the bee die-off, I was told a few days ago that some sort of fungus is also attacking the ubiquitous lady beetles. I wouldn’t mind seeing those particular invasive insects decline in numbers.


28 posted on 05/04/2007 4:36:29 AM PDT by reformedliberal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit
I love the last quote. Definitely tagline material.

It reminds me of a definition I read once in a Probaility and Statistics textbook. It went like this, "and unbiased sample means that it is biased".

29 posted on 05/04/2007 4:40:01 AM PDT by corlorde (New Hampshire)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: reformedliberal
"Regarding the bee die-off, I was told a few days ago that some sort of fungus is also attacking the ubiquitous lady beetles. I wouldn’t mind seeing those particular invasive insects decline in numbers."

...you mean the pine beetles? If so, I hope that we get some of that same fungus. Those are terrible down here (Rockies).
30 posted on 05/04/2007 4:40:30 AM PDT by familyop
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit
The article says it's happening also in Brazil, Canada and parts of Europe.

Carolyn

31 posted on 05/04/2007 4:47:31 AM PDT by CDHart ("It's too late to work within the system and too early to shoot the b@#$%^&s."--Claire Wolfe)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Virginia Ridgerunner

I live in South Central Pennsylvania...

I live in Lancaster County, just the other day as I was admiring my newly bloomed redbud tree I saw numerous small honeybees, something that would have escaped me in the past but which I’m watching for now...we’ll see what the summer has to bring...


32 posted on 05/04/2007 5:00:13 AM PDT by IrishBrigade
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: KeyWest
I am a beekeeper. This has happened before but back before the internet and instant news.

There may be a new pathogen, but so far it is just guessing. There is little common with those who lost bees.

My slowly evolving concern is GM crops that have a pyrethrin-producing gene from marigold.

How do bees handle pyrethrins? Years ago, beekeepers were up in arms about Sevin™- Not a pyrethrin, a carbaryl, but bees seemed especially vulnerable.

33 posted on 05/04/2007 5:04:59 AM PDT by Gorzaloon (Global Warming: A New Kind Of Scientology for the Rest Of Us.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: KeyWest
I have a small orchard and was thinking of learning about beekeeping and possibly getting a hive to place out in my trees and berry bushes. We have lots of wild blackberries and dewberries on our property as well.

We've recently moved my mother from her old house into a new one here on our property, and in trying to get the old house ready for sale we discovered an active hive in the board and batting above her dining room window. They appear healthy.

34 posted on 05/04/2007 5:12:00 AM PDT by Tuscaloosa Goldfinch (If MY people who are called by MY name -- the ball's in our court, folks.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit
The article says it's happening also in Brazil, Canada and parts of Europe.

Carolyn

35 posted on 05/04/2007 5:12:47 AM PDT by CDHart ("It's too late to work within the system and too early to shoot the b@#$%^&s."--Claire Wolfe)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: familyop

No, these are Asian Lady Beetles. They eat aphids. They are an invasive pest, as they seem to have no predators. I have been told, variously, that they came in on Chinese pallets, were released by the university ag services and I know that organic soybean producers released them in the past. They attempt to come indoors in the Fall, after swarming/mating and then they attempt to get out again in the late winter/early Spring. They die in the thousands in barns, attics, and windows of wherever they overwintered. When killed, they have an acrid stink and when disturbed, they bite, which is only a pinch, but annoying. Where they crawl mindlessly on windows, they leave a tenacious film.

My exterminator forecasts their swarming by the angle of the sun and it usually occurs in early October. Huge clouds of them will fill the air and crawl around windows and doors on the southern exposures of buildings. About all one can do is attempt to prevent them from entering by killing them on the perimeter. Still, a few get in even with application of a pesticide barrier. I know farmers who literally shovel trash bags full out of the barn and silos every Spring.


36 posted on 05/04/2007 5:19:25 AM PDT by reformedliberal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Wonder Warthog

—remembering even farther back, in the early ˜fifties, the fire ant was the big agricultural danger and was going to devastate the food supply-—


37 posted on 05/04/2007 5:37:17 AM PDT by rellimpank (-don't believe anything the MSM states about firearms or explosives--NRA Benefactor)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit

Appears to be happening in europe too.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070426100117.htm


38 posted on 05/04/2007 5:40:00 AM PDT by vietvet67
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: CarrotAndStick

Another ping to # 7.


39 posted on 05/04/2007 5:49:20 AM PDT by wouldntbprudent (HONK IF YOU'VE SACKED TROY SMITH.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: KeyWest

A voice of knowlege and reason! Thank you for speaking up.


40 posted on 05/04/2007 5:49:44 AM PDT by pepperdog
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Lexinom
how could a bacteria/parasite be so widespread so suddenly?

The problem has been around a long time. It is the reporting on the problem that has become widespread all of a sudden.
41 posted on 05/04/2007 5:51:07 AM PDT by P-40 (Al Qaeda was working in Iraq. They were just undocumented.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Thermalseeker

“Clover fields”-—that sounds nice.

After years of fighting clover to grow turf, we decided to fight turf and grow clover. What’s the secret?!


42 posted on 05/04/2007 5:52:31 AM PDT by wouldntbprudent (HONK IF YOU'VE SACKED TROY SMITH.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: calex59

How many millions of acres of agriculture did the Native Americans have to be pollinated?


43 posted on 05/04/2007 5:53:34 AM PDT by Anitius Severinus Boethius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Einigkeit_Recht_Freiheit

According to an article posted yesterday, there are 3,500 species of pollinating bees native to America. Just because they are not honeybees (not native to America), there are still a lot of bees pollinating.

If someone saved that article, could one put the link up, please? I can’t find it now.

Thank you.


44 posted on 05/04/2007 5:59:29 AM PDT by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Lexinom

Completely agree that this deserves more treatment than global warming.

And I’m seeing the same thing here as you are. I have two apple trees in full bloom. Normally I would have seen a lot of bee activity by now. In past years, there have been so many bees that when parked under the trees we had to be careful not to trap one of the bee sin the car. This year, little to no activity at all.

What type of equipment and setup is involved with irradiation?


45 posted on 05/04/2007 6:00:55 AM PDT by Dr._Joseph_Warren
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Anitius Severinus Boethius
How many millions of acres of agriculture did the Native Americans have to be pollinated?

Well, before the spanish traveled through the mississippi valley and florida and killed off whole tribes, they had most of the mississippi valley under agriculture. This has been proven and if you would read a little history you would know that. Plus, the whole of the country was under natural cultivation, ever hear of that? It's called nature, you know wild crops, grasses, trees, shrubs, all sorts of vegetation that had to be polinized and didn't use one honey bee to do it.

The crops the Indians had were mainly the three staples of their society, corn, beans and squash, and the tribes that farmed took up quite a few acres.

We don't need honey bees, this is another scare that just won't quit giving, one more disaster to make sure we cave in to the rules of the Dems. Buy into it if you want, but please read a little and actually study the scares when they crop up, it will save on your ulcer.

46 posted on 05/04/2007 6:31:05 AM PDT by calex59
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: rellimpank
"—remembering even farther back, in the early ˜fifties, the fire ant was the big agricultural danger and was going to devastate the food supply-—"

Oh, I remember that. I also remember the fedgov flying cargo planes over South Louisiana dropping tons of DDT-laced meal granules trying to kill them off. I just wonder if that just "might" be why DDT got the bad rep as an environmental contaminant.

47 posted on 05/04/2007 6:32:58 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog (The Hog of Steel-NRA)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: wouldntbprudent

Clover is good for ‘fixing’ nitrogen in the soil. Here it is a spring weed but goes away on its own as the weather warms.


48 posted on 05/04/2007 6:48:28 AM PDT by P-40 (Al Qaeda was working in Iraq. They were just undocumented.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: calex59

In 2007, there will be 90,500,000 acres of corn alone grown in the U.S.

Natural cultivation does not even start to require the type of pollinization that U.S. agriculture needs.


49 posted on 05/04/2007 7:13:16 AM PDT by Anitius Severinus Boethius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: Anitius Severinus Boethius
In 2007, there will be 90,500,000 acres of corn alone grown in the U.S. Natural cultivation does not even start to require the type of pollinization that U.S. agriculture needs.

Natural cultivation took in the whole of the US. Many more acres than are under cultivation today. Also, you ignored the Indians who grew crops, many, many acres of them before the Spanish wiped them out with diseases such as measles and small pox.

To think that honey bees are the only polinizers in the US, or on the planet, is just plain idiotic. Many crops were raised here in this country before honey bees were imported to the US also. How do you account for that? As I said, nature doesn't rely on one method to do a job. Crops will be pollinated.

Many insects besides bees pollinate crops.

For one thing ALL honey bees are not dead. Just two days ago an ER was shut down because a swarm of 7000 honey bees covered the ambulance entrance and they had to call a bee keeper to come get them.

I have hives near my home and the bees are just fine and thriving. As I said, this is the latest scrare tatic. If all else fails we can import bees to this country again, there are plenty in Europe, South America and Africa to draw from.

So take your head out from under the covers and stop quaking in fear, the problem(if one really exists) will be solved.

50 posted on 05/04/2007 7:28:14 AM PDT by calex59
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-65 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson