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To: betty boop
but how or why, no mortal may ever know."

Leibniz has the third take and was probably right, as Herder suggested. James was on that track a century later. Now, yet another century later, the consciousness seems to be lodged in the claustrum and chooses whether to go ahead with motion the body suggests. Usually it says 'not,' which makes free will more of 'free won't.' That is, the consciousness decides to not do or lets the motion proceed. Cartesian duality is out.

30 posted on 05/19/2007 9:54:17 AM PDT by RightWhale (Repeal the Treaty)
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To: RightWhale
Leibniz has the third take and was probably right, as Herder suggested. James was on that track a century later. Now, yet another century later, the consciousness seems to be lodged in the claustrum and chooses whether to go ahead with motion the body suggests.

Interesting empirical tidbit in this regard -- neurosurgen Frank Vertosik, in his memoirs When The Air Hits Your Brain, speaks of experiments in which most of the brains of housecats were removed, and then the cats returned to their owners. Most of the owners could not tell any difference in the cats' behaviour.

For the nonce, though, this treatment of the mind -- at least as you have described it -- doesn't explain hesitation, confusion, memory, or learning. Is there more to the story?

Cheers!

121 posted on 05/25/2007 10:12:34 PM PDT by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
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