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Drifters Could Explain Sweet-Potato Travel
Nature ^ | 5-18-2007

Posted on 05/20/2007 4:28:04 PM PDT by blam

Drifters could explain sweet-potato travel

An unsteered ship may have delivered crop to Polynesia.

Brendan Borrell

Where did these come from?

How did the South American sweet potato wind up in Polynesia? New research suggests that the crop could have simply floated there on a ship.

The origin of the sweet potato in the South Pacific has long been a mystery. The food crop undisputedly has its roots in the Andes. It was once thought to have been spread by Spanish and Portuguese sailors in the sixteenth century, but archaeological evidence indicates that Polynesians were cultivating the orange-fleshed tuber much earlier than that, by at least AD 1000. However, there's no hard evidence of people travelling between South America and the South Pacific so early in history. Most Polynesian crops have their origins in Asia, where the people are thought to have migrated from.

Some scientists have suggested that sweet-potato seeds were carried in the stomachs of itinerant birds. Others suggested that Polynesians once voyaged to the Ecuadorian coast, and — foregoing such South American staples such as maize and Phaseolus beans — they brought back a root that reminded them of Asian yams. Still others proposed that the sweet potato floated 8,000 kilometres across open ocean, either in its spherical seed pod or in a drifting vessel.

An unlikely journey

This last theory was dismissed in the 1970s, when a group of researchers ran what was then a state-of-the-art ocean-circulation simulation and concluded that the vessels would be extremely unlikely to drift into Polynesia by accident1. But Álvaro Montenegro, an oceanographer at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, says that this old model has "outlived its usefulness". Researchers now know, for instance, that the equatorial ocean currents travel much faster than previously thought; projections of drift have changed.

Montenegro and his team used data from the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) experiment, which combines a circulation model with 12 years of oceanographic measurements. This approach gives a glimpse of circulation patterns with a spatial resolution of about 50 square kilometres, and allowed Montenegro to consider 160 launch sites along the South and Central American coast compared with the earlier team's six.

In the simulation, sweet-potato seed pods that started off in these American waters could reasonably hit seven different island groups, and had the best chance of landing on the Marquesas. "Among the three most likely targets that get hit, two are within the area where people believe the crop was introduced," says Montenegro. But the trip took at least four months. Even coconuts can't survive in salt water that long.

More likely, says the team, a loaded vessel was blown out to sea and landed on the islands — which could take as little as 90 days, they report in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science2. Montenegro notes that seed pods are transported by currents alone, but a drifting vessel gains momentum from the wind.

Rooted in fact?

With 2,000 years between sweet-potato domestication in South America and its arrival in Polynesia, there have probably been numerous such drift events. But did people survive the trip, along with the crops?

Montenegro says linguistic similarities between the Quechua word for the tuber, cumal, and the Polynesian one, kumala, suggest that humans must have been along for the ride. Patrick Kirch, an archaeologist at the University of California, Berkeley, who has worked on the issue, thinks that more extensive and deliberate contact must have taken place. "In my view, the most probable mechanism of transport was Polynesians sailing to South America," he says.

The simulations, Montenegro says, simply demonstrate the feasibility of the drift theory, but a final verdict will depend on future archaeological findings. This approach may also help us understand how other plants, such as the bottle gourd, have drifted to the distant islands. And vessel drift is not just a thing of the past either. Montenegro points out that in 2005-2006, a fishing boat from Mexico was swept to the Marshall Islands — just as his model predicts.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: drifters; godsgravesglyphs; polynesia; sweetpotato; travel

1 posted on 05/20/2007 4:28:07 PM PDT by blam
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To: SunkenCiv
GGG Ping.

Another recent potato story:

Biotechnology Solves Debate Over Origin Of European Potato

2 posted on 05/20/2007 4:29:44 PM PDT by blam
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The Drifters
Hey, someone was going to...
3 posted on 05/20/2007 4:36:51 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Time heals all wounds, particularly when they're not yours. Profile updated May 18, 2007.)
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To: blam; FairOpinion; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 24Karet; 3AngelaD; 49th; ...
Thanks Blam.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list. Thanks.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the
"Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list or GGG weekly digest
-- Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

4 posted on 05/20/2007 4:37:10 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Time heals all wounds, particularly when they're not yours. Profile updated May 18, 2007.)
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To: blam
could have simply floated there on a ship

"I yam what I yam."


5 posted on 05/20/2007 4:39:45 PM PDT by Larry Lucido (Duncan Hunter 2008 (or Fred Thompson if he ever makes up his mind))
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To: SunkenCiv

There Goes My Baby...Not Under The Boardwalk or the Club at the End of the Street either. But, in the end, it is Some Kind of Wonderful.


6 posted on 05/20/2007 4:42:18 PM PDT by Clemenza (Rudy Giuliani, like Pesto and Seattle, belongs in the scrap heap of '90s Culture)
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To: blam

In NZ these “sweet potato” are called kumara. They have three colors: gold, white, and red. Much nicer than what you Yanks would call “yams”: you can prepare them exactly like you would a potato. Very, very nice: deep-fried they are a delicious change from Freedom Fries. (Serve with sour cream rather than ketchup, perfect for soaking up excess beer urrrp!). Very nice mashed, or roasted with other root vegetables around the Sunday roast.

Did they arrive here from the Andes? I doubt it. Maori have been cultivating kumara ever since they arrived here in NZ, it is a hi-value hi-energy carbohydrate that would be just perfect for hooning around the South Pacific in dugout canoes. Just as likely a roving band of Maori dropped some kumara off in the Andes during one of their South Pacific cannibalizing jaunts.

The longer I live in NZ, the more convinced I am that the Maori and the Pacific Islanders were alot more clever and mobile than history has given them credit for. The mere facts that they never discovered the wheel, or metals, or a written language is quite deceiving.

Nope: I’m going to put a stake in the ground and state confidently that the Maori brought Kumara to South America, and not the other way around.


7 posted on 05/20/2007 6:30:50 PM PDT by DieHard the Hunter
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To: blam

I’m just glad they got here.


8 posted on 05/20/2007 6:32:39 PM PDT by varina davis
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To: labette

ping


9 posted on 05/20/2007 6:40:17 PM PDT by null and void (Who turned the clock? (Moved on or back) and what dark chill is gathering still before the storm?)
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To: blam

> Drifters could explain sweet-potato travel
>
> An unsteered ship may have delivered crop to Polynesia.

I used to be of the opinion that Maori shipwrecked ashore in New Zealand and that they did not navigate their way here, contrary to their oral traditions.

I have changed my mind, having become immersed in their culture.

They were very, very clever with their dugout ocean-going canoes, filled with fghting-fit warrior cannibals, each of them rowing under the direction of a single Navigator. They could beyond doubt navigate by stars, and they could use ocean currents like we use Interstate Hiways.

Something like stone-age Vikings, except with fewer clothes.

Beyond doubt they had regular exchange with Tahitians and Cook Islanders (the languages and physical characteristics are virtually identical) and definitely the Hawaiians (a nine hour flite from Auckland: still, the languages are strikingly similar).

The jolly “kumara” sweet potatoes would never have gotten here by drifting. If brought to NZ from South America, it would have been delivered by war canoe by a marauding raiding party of hungry Maori cannibals, who would have noticed that kumara made a nice condiment to be served with Incas, both roasted slowly in their clay hangi pits.

More likely in my view, the Maori brought kumara to South America.


10 posted on 05/20/2007 6:43:30 PM PDT by DieHard the Hunter
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To: blam

I would think that this had already been settled back in the 40’s by Thor Heyerdahl.


11 posted on 05/20/2007 6:43:33 PM PDT by Roccus (Stolen tag.............The "P" in Democrat stands for Patriotism.)
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To: DieHard the Hunter
Maori and the Pacific Islanders were alot more clever and mobile than history has given them credit for.

What "primitive people" but the Maori were able to fight the Europeans to a standstill?

12 posted on 05/20/2007 6:44:51 PM PDT by null and void (Who turned the clock? (Moved on or back) and what dark chill is gathering still before the storm?)
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To: blam
Sweet potato ping!
13 posted on 05/20/2007 6:56:31 PM PDT by NaughtiusMaximus ("Eat yer groatcakes, Porgy!" "Heavy on the thirty weight, Mom!")
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To: null and void

Ping appreciated!


14 posted on 05/20/2007 7:05:33 PM PDT by labette (Money may not buy happiness, but it will buy politicians)
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To: labette

I thought you’d be interested...

;^)


15 posted on 05/20/2007 7:07:33 PM PDT by null and void (Who turned the clock? (Moved on or back) and what dark chill is gathering still before the storm?)
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To: Roccus
I would think that this had already been settled back in the 40’s by Thor Heyerdahl.

Thor Heyerdahl's main theory turned out to be wrong, as genetic evidence makes it obvious that current Polynesians are from Southeast Asia, not the Americas.

16 posted on 05/20/2007 7:09:55 PM PDT by Strategerist
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To: Strategerist

> Thor Heyerdahl’s main theory turned out to be wrong, as genetic evidence makes it obvious that current Polynesians are from Southeast Asia, not the Americas.

Perhaps the Southeast Asians are from Polynesia?


17 posted on 05/20/2007 7:21:38 PM PDT by DieHard the Hunter
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To: blam

This is all just rumor and innuendo. My forebears were not “drifters” at all. Rather, I come from a long line of rogues, charming and rakishly handsome all, and we shall not abide this calumny!


18 posted on 05/20/2007 9:08:46 PM PDT by rogue yam
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To: Roccus
"I would think that this had already been settled back in the 40’s by Thor Heyerdahl."

DNA studies show that there was no gene flow from South America out into the Pacific.

19 posted on 05/20/2007 10:31:50 PM PDT by blam
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To: DieHard the Hunter
"More likely in my view, the Maori brought kumara to South America."

Nah. The potato, all 2,000 varieties, are native to South America...no one questions that. The question is how they got to the Pacific Islands.

20 posted on 05/20/2007 10:34:40 PM PDT by blam
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To: null and void
Violence Is Blamed On 'Warrior Gene' In The Maoris
21 posted on 05/20/2007 10:36:29 PM PDT by blam
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To: DieHard the Hunter
Maori Men And Women From Different Homelands
22 posted on 05/20/2007 10:41:34 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

the cannibal polynesians apprehended the South American voyagers, stole their boat, ate the sailors, planted the potatoes?


23 posted on 05/20/2007 10:43:20 PM PDT by Fred Nerks (Fair Dinkum!)
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To: Fred Nerks
"The cannibal polynesians apprehended the South American voyagers, stole their boat, ate the sailors, planted the potatoes?"

Could be.

24 posted on 05/20/2007 10:49:18 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

Intercontinental yam cannon.


25 posted on 05/20/2007 10:50:35 PM PDT by Yardstick
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To: Fred Nerks
Evidence Of Tunguska-Type Impacts Over The Pacific Basin Around The Year 1178 AD
26 posted on 05/20/2007 10:51:05 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

> Nah. The potato, all 2,000 varieties, are native to South America...no one questions that. The question is how they got to the Pacific Islands.

Nobody questions it because it is “conventional wisdom”. Just like the earth being flat was once “conventional wisdom”. Aside from discovering gold and gems, the South American natives didn’t seem to do too much to advance their civilization beyond their jungles.

They were certainly no match for the Spaniards. So I doubt they did anything nearly so brilliant as invent potatoes: far less export them to the South Pacific.

(Could they even swim? Where are the Inca war canoes? The Mayan navy? The Aztec Flotilla? Naw, these lot were all Land-Lubbers!)

I can confidently assert that the Spaniard conquistadors would not have been able to knock over the Maori the way they knocked over the Aztecs, the Maya and the Incas. The conquistadors would have been yum-yum-yummy in the Maori tum-tum-tummy, and they would have had the unpleasant side-effect of introducing Maori to firearms and light armor 300 years before they gottem off the British. History would surely have been re-written if that were the case.

Nope — I propose that until proven otherwise the Maori invented Kumara and brought ‘em to South America.


27 posted on 05/20/2007 11:10:42 PM PDT by DieHard the Hunter
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To: blam
thanks for the link, that should keep me quiet for a little while...

btw, I've got a theory that answers everything!

(Wait for it.)

.

.

Continental Drift is BS. Here's what really happened. Explains the potato story and a whole lot more.


28 posted on 05/20/2007 11:24:11 PM PDT by Fred Nerks (Fair Dinkum!)
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To: DieHard the Hunter

I’d agree, except for one thing - if the Maoris visited South America, they would have left a lasting impression on the locals...


29 posted on 05/21/2007 5:53:49 AM PDT by Little Ray (Rudy Guiliani: if his wives can't trust him, why should we?)
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To: Fred Nerks

Huh? What is that animation supposed to be?


30 posted on 05/21/2007 6:04:02 AM PDT by Pyro7480 ("Jesu, Jesu, Jesu, esto mihi Jesus" -St. Ralph Sherwin's last words at Tyburn)
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To: blam
The idea that sweet potatoes just drifted across the Pacific and landed by chance on a Polynesian beach strikes me as much less probable than man having a hand in the navigation. Could one even grow after being soaked in brine for so long?
31 posted on 05/21/2007 9:17:15 AM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: Little Ray

> I’d agree, except for one thing - if the Maoris visited South America, they would have left a lasting impression on the locals...

(grin!) like being the Inca version of The Boogey Man? It’s plausible...

“Eat up all your kumara, Jonny, or the Maori will get ya!”

A Maori warrior with a full-on facial moko (tattoo) looks about as Heathen and frightening as one could possibly imagine. Certainly enough to scare the crap out of Inca kids misbehaving.


32 posted on 05/21/2007 10:22:02 AM PDT by DieHard the Hunter
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To: Pyro7480

http://microlnx.com/expansion/

;-)


33 posted on 05/21/2007 2:40:03 PM PDT by Fred Nerks (Fair Dinkum!)
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34 posted on 09/17/2009 4:59:54 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/__Since Jan 3, 2004__Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
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