Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Dyslexia 'is just a middle-class way to hide stupidity'
Drudge ^ | 5/29/07 | REBECCA CAMBER

Posted on 05/29/2007 3:55:31 AM PDT by mek1959

Dyslexia is a social fig leaf used by middle-class parents who fear their children will be labelled as low achievers, a professor has claimed.

Julian Elliott, a leading educational psychologist at Durham University, says he has found no evidence to identify dyslexia as a medical condition after more than 30 years of research.

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: culture; parenting; psychobabble
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-150151-169 next last
It's about time someone takes on the numerous "victimization" titles like ADD, ADHD, Dyslexia and on and on and on so commonly used today. These titles rarely make people stronger, just victims with excuses about why I can't do this or that. Believe me, I've seen it.
1 posted on 05/29/2007 3:55:35 AM PDT by mek1959
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: mek1959

So General Patton was stupid......
and I think Churchill was too...
you can tell them, ok.


2 posted on 05/29/2007 3:57:57 AM PDT by Yorlik803 ( When are we going to draw a line a say"this far and no farther")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mek1959

IF this is true, then one would assume that dyslexia could be corrected through special teaching methods.


3 posted on 05/29/2007 3:59:10 AM PDT by nikos1121 (Thank you again Jimmy Carter.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mek1959

Dyslexics Untie!

Thank Dog I’m not dyslexic.


4 posted on 05/29/2007 3:59:18 AM PDT by dawn53
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mek1959

I thought Nelson Rockefeller was dyslexic. He may have been stupid (but I doubt it) but he wasn’t middle class.


5 posted on 05/29/2007 3:59:56 AM PDT by bkepley
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yorlik803

“So General Patton was stupid......
and I think Churchill was too...
you can tell them, ok.”

I think the subtext of this article is referring to Bush...


6 posted on 05/29/2007 3:59:59 AM PDT by nikos1121 (Thank you again Jimmy Carter.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: nikos1121

There are times when I do misread things. See words that are not there.


7 posted on 05/29/2007 4:00:37 AM PDT by Perdogg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: mek1959

I’m not dyslexic, I just can’t lleps.


8 posted on 05/29/2007 4:01:25 AM PDT by WorkerbeeCitizen (I Relieve Myself In Islam's General Direction While I Deny Global Warming.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mek1959

It’s terrible having dyslexia. Take it from someone who accidentally sold their soul to Santa.


9 posted on 05/29/2007 4:01:40 AM PDT by tlb
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mek1959
“It’s about time someone takes on the numerous “victimization” titles like ADD, ADHD, Dyslexia and on and on and on so commonly used today. These titles rarely make people stronger, just victims with excuses about why I can’t do this or that. Believe me, I’ve seen it.”

DITTO!

It’s a bunch of bunk for others to feed off of via “special programs” at YOUR expense. It’s an industry designed to siphon money off STUPID PEOPLE!

10 posted on 05/29/2007 4:02:27 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God) .)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nikos1121

Must be a lib thing then...everything is about Bush....
But didnt Bush get better grades than Algore?
Maybe Algore is a Moron...


11 posted on 05/29/2007 4:04:41 AM PDT by Yorlik803 ( When are we going to draw a line a say"this far and no farther")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: mek1959
I think these things are casually diagnosed. A lot of people with ADD and ADHD just suffer from poor parenting. But it's going to far to say that the problems are wholly fictional.

Dyslexia, for one thing, is often linked with the style of reading instruction. Phonics is a good way to teach people to see and understand each part of the word. Rates of dyslexia go down. But Whole Language teaches people to swallow the shape of the word and then pronounce it. Rates of Dyslexia go up.

12 posted on 05/29/2007 4:05:12 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy (Enoch Powell was right.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mek1959

According to Professor Elliott, dyslexic university students are gaining an unfair advantage by getting extra time for their studies and many are getting diagnosed simply to get up to £10,000 worth of equipment including laptops and extra books.

University lecturers have complained about students “milking the system” by pretending they have the condition.

One lecturer who teaches in the South-East said:

“On one degree course I teach, about one quarter of the students get help with their coursework and other assistance because they have this label. You become quite cynical.”

The number of students who receive disability allowances at university has risen to a record 35,500 at a cost of £78.4million a year.


13 posted on 05/29/2007 4:05:49 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God) .)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mek1959

> Dyslexia is a social fig leaf used by middle-class parents who fear their children will be labelled as low achievers, a professor has claimed.

Dyslexia is very much a real phenomenon, as is ADHD. Neither is a handicap, as both my brother and I can attest. They have absolutely nothing to do with intelligence or achievement potential. They are merely inconvenient for standard teaching methodologies.

*DieHard*


14 posted on 05/29/2007 4:08:24 AM PDT by DieHard the Hunter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nmh

In this country, college kids will often seek a ADD or ADHD diagnosis so they can be prescribed Ritalin...which they then sell to the other college students. It’s evidently a great for “cramming” for exams, etc.


15 posted on 05/29/2007 4:08:39 AM PDT by dawn53
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: nikos1121

> IF this is true, then one would assume that dyslexia could be corrected through special teaching methods.

It can.


16 posted on 05/29/2007 4:09:04 AM PDT by DieHard the Hunter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: tlb

LOL...


17 posted on 05/29/2007 4:09:17 AM PDT by tcostell (MOLON LABE)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: mek1959

Whatever happened to that perfect word, “underachiever”?
If I hadn’t been slapped with that in the third grade, I’d probably still be slaking off.


18 posted on 05/29/2007 4:11:34 AM PDT by Thrownatbirth (.....when the sidewalks are safe for the little guy.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mek1959

The reseracher has no cule about dylsexics.


19 posted on 05/29/2007 4:12:32 AM PDT by azhenfud (The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DieHard the Hunter
I second that. I have dyslexia as well, but I got past it the same way Patton did. If it's been twice as hard for me to get by, then I simply worked three times as hard to make up the difference.

Great men are not great because of the things that are easy for them, but for the things which are hard for them that they do anyway.

20 posted on 05/29/2007 4:13:49 AM PDT by tcostell (MOLON LABE)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: dawn53
I doubt that there is a big business is selling Ritalin since doctors give it out like candy.
21 posted on 05/29/2007 4:15:55 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God) .)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: mek1959

One of my husbands was severely dyslexic. Being a high achiever in a field where reading wasn’t critical, he took it with his usual good humor when I LMAO watching him undergo an eye test. (You had to be there.)

Dyslexic people can be highly intelligent. They just have trouble reading. Maybe at some early point this could have been remedied, and wasn’t. Maybe not. But it’s real.


22 posted on 05/29/2007 4:20:38 AM PDT by Graymatter (FREDeralist)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mek1959

So now I’m to believe dyslexia doesn’t exist because it is poorly defined and/or isn’t well addressed by educational organizations? Then what the hell is “stupidity”? It seems to me the term “stupidity” is no less poorly defined and/or well addressed by educational organizations. I’d have to be stupid to accept such a simplistic dismissal of something as complex as dyslexia as mere middle-class self-indulgence. It also seems to me that merely dismissing dyslexia is in itself a gross self-indulgence on the part of those who don’t want to incur the extra expense of paying for individual differences in learning styles.


23 posted on 05/29/2007 4:22:27 AM PDT by rhombus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nikos1121

In Churchill case, it was cured by Churchill. He couldn’t do Latin so he did English. As for teaching methods, one problem is that most teachers can only play to the strengths of students who are most like the teacher.


24 posted on 05/29/2007 4:22:42 AM PDT by RobbyS ( CHIRHO)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: nikos1121

The world will long remember Julian Elliott.


25 posted on 05/29/2007 4:22:44 AM PDT by pleikumud
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: dawn53

I am a cixelsyd, sorrry dyslexic, I also have degrees in four different engineering fields; I also stutter. I didn’t find out that I had dyslexia until my first year in college while taking a non-technical elective in psych.
Dyslexia is not a problem for me at all. OK, once I did my income taxes in reverse, but I go it fixed. Some the brightest people in history have been dyslexic. Any child with dyslexia needs only to have it explained to him and he will cope, adapt and you’ll never know they are dyslexic. Hell, they might even turn out brighter than the people who consider it a problem.


26 posted on 05/29/2007 4:24:25 AM PDT by BuffaloJack
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: ClearCase_guy

It’s just awful what they have done to reading.

The proof is what happened to basic reading rates with soldiers/draftees from World War I, II, and Korea. By the time Korea came around, illiteracy rates had soared to over 15 per cent. The only difference was the method of instruction had changed. Phonics works, which must be why it is no longer utilized??


27 posted on 05/29/2007 4:27:43 AM PDT by Freedom4US
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: dawn53

Ritalin is a stimulant and is in the same class of drugs as cocaine.

http://breggin.com/


28 posted on 05/29/2007 4:28:03 AM PDT by tutstar (Baptist Ping list - freepmail me to get on or off.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: ClearCase_guy; Mr. Silverback

> Dyslexia, for one thing, is often linked with the style of reading instruction.

I believe there is a whole, vast and almost untapped body of knowledge surrounding the mechanics of reading instruction. I believe we have just barely scratched the surface on how the Human minds work, and that our teaching methods to date have catered to only a few learning styles, whereas the vast majority would probably respond better to being taught by other techniques. And I’d be willing to wager that most of these “other techniques” have yet to be fully explored or even discovered. After all, much of our brain’s capability and potential is thought to be untapped.


29 posted on 05/29/2007 4:29:48 AM PDT by DieHard the Hunter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: dawn53

Does a dyslexic agnostic lie awake at night wondering if there is a dog?


30 posted on 05/29/2007 4:30:20 AM PDT by Andonius_99 (There are two sides to every issue. One is right, the other is wrong; but the middle is always evil.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: nmh

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/extra/speakout/mystory/add_2-24.html

Interesting article about black market sales of Ritalin on campus.


31 posted on 05/29/2007 4:30:22 AM PDT by dawn53
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: mek1959
This is nothing more than a cheap shot at a real problem by someone who wants attention the easy way. Neal Bortz goes off the deep end on purpose sometimes just to get the phones ringing. I hope the ringing this person hears is from a concussion caused from a Dyslexic person trying to swing a baseball bat the other way.
32 posted on 05/29/2007 4:31:43 AM PDT by Dixie Yooper (Ephesians 6:11)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: tcostell
LOL

It's obvious to me that you are dyslexic. You wrote that backwards.

33 posted on 05/29/2007 4:36:02 AM PDT by MARTIAL MONK
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: mek1959
Dyslexia is a very over-used term, but it does not qualify a child for special education services so it is not used as a label in US schools as it apparently is in UK schools. What happens here is that someone will claim a child has dyslexia when they see them turning around numbers or writing backwards. That is not dyslexia, that is a completely different issue.

Dyslexia is a true impairment that affects every means of communication including reading, writing, and speaking. It is also quite rare. In 10 years of special education and reading instruction, I have taught exactly 1 true dyslexic. This child struggled in every area, but demonstrated marked intelligence with numbers. He is a high school sophomore and is taking Calculus BC this year and will have to start at the local junior college soon to keep his math going. I'd see him doing Calc III before 18. BUT, he reads at about a 4th grade level and speaking for him is obviously painful. He almost needs another language approach, one that uses numbers instead of letters.

I'm not sure what means the UK uses to come with the term 'dyslexic' but here in the U.S. it is not a federally recognized category for special education services, so we hear it in anecdotes, not in labels.

34 posted on 05/29/2007 4:38:10 AM PDT by SoftballMominVA (Never argue with an idiot. He will bring you down to his level and beat you with experience)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BuffaloJack

“Any child with dyslexia needs only to have it explained to him and he will cope, adapt and you’ll never know they are dyslexic”

Do you think it relates to phonics versus whole-word methods of teaching students to read?


35 posted on 05/29/2007 4:38:55 AM PDT by webstersII
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: webstersII
Do you think it relates to phonics versus whole-word methods of teaching students to read?

Whole language can exacerbate many reading difficulties. The trend now is to use developmental reading which draws heavily upon the phonics base of knowledge with controlled reading and less emphasis on drills

36 posted on 05/29/2007 4:42:23 AM PDT by SoftballMominVA (Never argue with an idiot. He will bring you down to his level and beat you with experience)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: BuffaloJack

My form often used to leave my papers written with entire sentences missing or words and letters dropped from sentences I had written. I would do the same thing when I would read. I often would swear up and and down that I had done or read everything(almost violently so, I was so convinced), when I was told I had a form of dyslexia I was enrolled into an extra class after school where the teacher would have me reread aloud over and over again until I got it right. I had to do this for 3 years. Since then I have an almost 99% correct rate of reading and writing and normally do not have to read things more than once to understand fully(whichis a key, I couldnt comprehend that I missed something, I now can comprehend that I missed something) , writing I still sometimes have fits where I continously have to read and reread and correct my mistakes. Not every dyslexia is as simple as mine though but I am bettng alot of these cases could use good old fashioned teaching of perseverence to overcome the issue.


37 posted on 05/29/2007 4:48:08 AM PDT by aft_lizard (born conservative...I chose to be a republican)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: SoftballMominVA

> I’m not sure what means the UK uses to come with the term ‘dyslexic’ but here in the U.S. it is not a federally recognized category for special education services, so we hear it in anecdotes, not in labels.

In New Zealand, dyslexia has only just become recognized by our Government, about a fortnite ago.


38 posted on 05/29/2007 4:48:15 AM PDT by DieHard the Hunter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: DieHard the Hunter

Are you aware that Whole Language came out of New Zealand?


39 posted on 05/29/2007 4:50:19 AM PDT by SoftballMominVA (Never argue with an idiot. He will bring you down to his level and beat you with experience)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: SoftballMominVA

> Are you aware that Whole Language came out of New Zealand?

No, that’s a new one on me...

I was educated in Vancouver. ITA was all the rage back then.


40 posted on 05/29/2007 4:51:55 AM PDT by DieHard the Hunter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: Yorlik803

Did Patton or Churchill ever claim to have dyslexia or any disability?

The Churchill Centre says:
“In his autobiography he played up his low grades at Harrow, undoubtedly to convince readers, and possibly himself, how much he had overcome; but in this he exaggerated.”

Everyone wants to believe that he has overcome great odds!


41 posted on 05/29/2007 4:53:30 AM PDT by iowamark
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: nmh
It’s a bunch of bunk for others to feed off of via “special programs” at YOUR expense. It’s an industry designed to siphon money off STUPID PEOPLE!

My son gets special, tax payer paid education for this impairmant. Thanks for your contribution.

42 posted on 05/29/2007 4:55:43 AM PDT by ExtremeUnction
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: DieHard the Hunter

When I was in kindergarten I had to go to a school tutor because I sometimes would read or write the letters of words in the wrong sequence. For example Was would become saw. It was never a big deal. Of course that was before they had a fancy name for my problem and realized they could milk federal dollars for it. Lots of federal dollars every exceptional student means an increase in the money allocated for FTE.


43 posted on 05/29/2007 4:58:25 AM PDT by lastchance (Hug your babies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: mek1959; All
victims with excuses

Nice compassion. Sorry to burst your superiority bubble, but such neurological symptoms as dyslexia have been tied to underlying chronic Lyme disease, and go away when the Lyme is treated.

44 posted on 05/29/2007 4:58:28 AM PDT by slowhandluke (It's hard work to be cynical enough in this age)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mek1959

“It’s about time someone takes on the numerous “victimization” titles like ADD, ADHD, Dyslexia and on and on and on so commonly used today.”

Wish I had a dollar for every time I’ve heard some parent decry, “He’s got ADD!”. Everytime the kid gets in trouble or fails, that’s the excuse these days. Sad, really.


45 posted on 05/29/2007 4:59:09 AM PDT by L98Fiero (A fool who'll waste his life, God rest his guts.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: All

Poor parent, front and center, right here.

My DH, SIL and FIL are dyslexic. So is my oldest kid. This was not a casual label that we slapped on my kid to get her special treatment in school. She had that tendency; her kindegarten and first grade teachers were inexperienced; and the school uses a hashed up method of teaching reading. She struggled until 3rd grade until her teacher — an older lady who used a different teaching method — tried to pick up the pieces. DD is now in the top reading group in her class and over the school year came in 3rd out of her whole grade for readign achievement.

The emotional fall-out of being considered “learning disabled” or “special ed” for an intelligent child is not worth any little breaks she might get.

She wants to be an astronaut and be one of the first settlers on the noom or sraM


46 posted on 05/29/2007 4:59:42 AM PDT by Cloverfarm (Children are a blessing ...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mek1959
It's about time someone takes on the numerous "victimization" titles like ADD, ADHD, Dyslexia and on and on and on so commonly used today.

Some may game the system as victims. However, dyslexia is real. While in law school, I clerked for a brilliant attorney who was dyslexic. He had an assistant who read to him and proofread what he wrote. In the courtroom, he usually won.

For legitimate treatment of dyslexia and related disorders, check out the work done by the Scottish Rite. The largest provider of services to dyslexics in the U.S., the Scottish Rite does so whether or not a family can afford to pay. A very worthwhile cause.

47 posted on 05/29/2007 4:59:54 AM PDT by peyton randolph (What we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal - Albert Pike)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dawn53

Did you hear about the dyslexic agnostic with insommnia?
He stayed up all night wondering about the existence of dog.


48 posted on 05/29/2007 5:01:36 AM PDT by lastchance (Hug your babies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Cloverfarm
Poor parent, front and center, right here.
Check out post #47. Your child may be eligible for free help through the Scottish Rite's language centers.
49 posted on 05/29/2007 5:02:20 AM PDT by peyton randolph (What we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal - Albert Pike)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: mek1959
I agree that ADHD and ADD are frequently over-diagnosed, and in our state, if a child is on public assistance, having that diagnosis means additional money for the parent, and for the school the child attends. Financially, it's a very good thing if a school can have a child diagnosed as having some sort of disability, i.e., ADD, or ADHD.

Having said that, however, my husband, we think (who is now in his 50's and wasn't tested for this back when) struggled with dyslexia in school, but he's far from stupid. He's creative, resourceful, can figure out how to do almost anything.

50 posted on 05/29/2007 5:05:43 AM PDT by Tuscaloosa Goldfinch (If MY people who are called by MY name -- the ball's in our court, folks.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-150151-169 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson