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Spoonful of Sugar Makes the Nutrients Go Down?
ABC News ^ | 6/27/07 | KEITH-THOMAS AYOOB

Posted on 06/27/2007 12:28:52 PM PDT by ZGuy

Sugar in Cereals May Not Be Such a Bad Thing After All

There has been lots of hoopla lately about the sugar in breakfast cereals.

Kellogg recently announced that it would put an upper limit on sugar for cereals and all the foods it markets to children. General Mills announced some time ago that at least half the grain in all its cereals would be whole grain.

Breakfast cereal is also an object of heavy scrutiny by all manner of health experts and consumer watchdogs, and that's a good thing. Kids eat lots of breakfast cereal. They also drink lots of soda, but more about that later.

Anything kids eat a lot of should be healthful and nutritious, so let's take a closer look at just what sugar is doing in breakfast cereals in the first place.

Cereal 101

Most breakfast cereals are fortified with numerous essential vitamins and minerals. Not every single one you need, mind you, but a lot.

Have you ever tasted raw vitamins and minerals? They tend to taste bitter. Just suck on an iron pill and you'll get the picture.

To complicate matters, fortified cereal usually has amounts of nutrients not usually found in nature (Mother Nature doesn't usually put precisely "a third of 10 essential vitamins and minerals" into a single serving of a food). So how can you get around the bitter, often metallic taste of added nutrients? Cut it with a little salt and/or sugar.

Sugar was added to cereal, and kids (and adults) ate it up. A little more sugar got added, and they ate up more, and by now some cereals are a full 50 percent added sugar. It was getting so that kids are having some grain with their sugar … and enough already.

A saving grace of cereal, however, is that it's a "vehicle food." Cereal could be eaten alone, but it is most often eaten with milk and perhaps some fruit. Indeed, it can be a great way to get milk and fresh fruit into kids (and adults, too).

The question is how much is enough, and where should the boundary be drawn?

A single serving of most cereals (about an ounce, or 30 grams, on average) has about 110 calories. Add a cup of 1 percent milk and you have another 100 calories. Add one-half cup of fresh fruit and tack on another 60 calories, for a total of 270 calories and a nice, balanced meal in the morning that won't add to your waistline -- or that of your kids.

Should Cereal Have Less Sugar?

Some would argue that because cereal is a staple and is often eaten daily, it should have less sugar, so let's look at the cereal calories more closely.

A very sweet cereal has a whopping 15 grams of sugar per serving (basically, it's half sugar) -- you're talking about just under four teaspoons of sugar. That's pretty significant for a cereal, but it pales compared to the sugar content of a single 12-ounce can of cola that has about 10 teaspoons of sugar and absolutely nothing redeeming about it nutritionally; you don't eat cola with fruit, and there's no calcium source involved, and no whole grain.

Is it perhaps more important that kids are getting much more sugar daily from soda, punch and fruit-flavored drinks than they would from a week's worth of a moderately sweetened breakfast cereal?

Teenage boys get nearly 19 ounces of soda and fruit drinks daily, and most kids are getting at least 12 ounces of such drinks daily. Teenagers often drink twice that or more.

Think about those 1-liter bottles of soda that end up being a single serving of about 28 teaspoons of sugar -- about half cup. Have a look at the list below for a comparison:

Sweetest cereal -- 15 grams of sugar (about 4 teaspoons)

Moderately sweet cereal -- 9 grams of sugar (about 2 teaspoons)

Kids' oat cereal -- 1 gram of sugar (about one-quarter teaspoon)

8-ounce cola -- 28 grams of sugar (about 7 teaspoons)

16-ounce cola -- 56 grams of sugar (about 14 teaspoons)

8-ounce orange drink -- 27 grams of sugar (about 7 teaspoons)

What About Childhood Obesity?

Does the sugar in cereals contribute to obesity? The studies don't bear this out.

Studies on both adults and children showed that frequent cereal eaters -- meaning adults and children who ate cereal at least eight times in 14 days -- tended to have a lower body mass index (a measure of weight for height) than people who ate cereal from zero to three times in 14 days.

Of course, cereal eating may also just be a marker of a healthier eating behavior and more structured lifestyle, i.e. eating breakfast daily, regular meal times, etc.

But if so, breakfast eating is still a great habit for everyone to have. Studies show that people who eat breakfast daily have an easier time controlling weight, and kids who eat breakfast do better in school.

Of course, even kids' cereals don't have to have tons of sugar, and plenty of kid-friendly cereals have little or no added sugar. But if the child then adds several spoonfuls from the sugar bowl, is he or she any better off? Some would say yes, because at least there would be an option for control by the consumer (or the consumer's parent).

My issue with sugar in cereal is perhaps more consumer-savvy. Simply put, I'd rather pay for whole grain than sugar, and I advise my patients on a budget to do the same. The more sugar in the cereal, the less grain. Sugar is much cheaper than whole grain, so a whole grain cereal with less added sugar gives you more bang for the buck.

A little sugar in a cereal is fine. Whole grain cereal is a nutrient-rich food, and if eating it gets kids eating a breakfast that also includes fruit and milk, it can be a reasonable way to allot a few extra calories. The idea is to make the sugar supplementary to the grain, not vice-versa.

Here are some good tips for getting the cereal down without so much added sugar:

Combine a sweet cereal with a plain one that's whole grain. A 50/50 mix cuts the sugar almost in half.

Look for less than 10 grams of added sugar on the label. It'll still be plenty sweet, and aim for a whole grain cereal.

Get the sweetness factor up by adding fresh or dried fruit. You'll never get it sweeter than dried fruit, and it'll add some badly needed fiber to kids' diets, along with some minerals and antioxidants of its own. Think past raisins, too. Cranberries are colorful, kids like them and they're antioxidant warehouses.

If you add sugar to a plain cereal, think about the "rule of 1." That is, one spoonful is OK; more may be pushing it.

Add any sugar AFTER you add the milk, so it stays on top of the cereal, where you can taste it in every spoonful, and doesn't wash down to the bottom of the bowl. This way you'll make that one spoonful work for you.

Keith-Thomas Ayoob is an associate professor in the department of pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City.


TOPICS: Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: breakfast; cereals; nutrition

1 posted on 06/27/2007 12:28:53 PM PDT by ZGuy
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To: ZGuy

Captain Crunch and Cookie Crisp here I come!!!!!


2 posted on 06/27/2007 12:32:24 PM PDT by lovecraft (Specialization is for insects.)
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To: ZGuy

3 posted on 06/27/2007 12:33:32 PM PDT by ZGuy (Democrats : Corrupt or deceived. There are no other options.)
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To: ZGuy
I eat a good bit of granulated sugar every morning, about enough to fill a coffee cup. I’ve never felt or looked better in my life.
4 posted on 06/27/2007 12:35:06 PM PDT by Jaysun (It's like people who hate corn bread and hate anchovies, but love cornchovie bread.)
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To: ZGuy
Well, there's no question that sugary drinks are the biggest offenders, but a sweetened cereal still has way too many simple carbs - especially since most people (and especially kids) eat two or three times the recommended "serving size" at one sitting.

Stick with bacon and eggs. ;)

5 posted on 06/27/2007 12:38:56 PM PDT by Mr. Jeeves ("Wise men don't need to debate; men who need to debate are not wise." -- Tao Te Ching)
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To: ZGuy

I love that one!


6 posted on 06/27/2007 12:39:41 PM PDT by Mygirlsmom (I practice Calorie Offset Trading. I eat a candy bar & pay my kid 10 bucks to run around the block)
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To: ZGuy

I remember the Sugar Frosted Flakes I was addicted to growing up. But, I’m diabetic now—I feel cruddy if I eat much sugar anymore, and I’ve slashed my carbs way back. I do miss a big bowl of Rice or Corn Chex with cold milk, though.

}:-)4


7 posted on 06/27/2007 12:41:39 PM PDT by Moose4 (I'm not white trash. I'm a Caucasian recyclable.)
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To: ZGuy

I always like the expression “balanced diet.”

Fanatics who want to ban one kind of food or change it should take a look at the big picture.

The present “wellness” mentality with its anti-obesity fanaticism doesn’t see the big picture. It just wants to ban things.


8 posted on 06/27/2007 12:41:53 PM PDT by Nextrush ( Chris Matthews Band: "I get high....I get high.....I get high.....McCain......")
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To: ZGuy

I miss Sugar Smacks and Sugar Corn Pops............They removed the Sugar........from the names..........


9 posted on 06/27/2007 12:41:58 PM PDT by Red Badger (Bite your tongue. It tastes a lot better than crow................)
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To: Moose4

They don’t make Sugar Frosted Flakes anymore.........they’re just “Frosted Flakes” now.........


10 posted on 06/27/2007 12:43:00 PM PDT by Red Badger (Bite your tongue. It tastes a lot better than crow................)
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To: ZGuy

Can I just have a chocolate bar with my meals?


11 posted on 06/27/2007 12:46:57 PM PDT by B4Ranch (Check out this website for the National Veterans Coalition http://www.nvets.org/)
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To: ZGuy

Cinnamon toast crunch is the best.


12 posted on 06/27/2007 12:49:07 PM PDT by JamesP81 (Romans 10:9)
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To: Red Badger

I think my favorites were Cap’n Crunch, Quake and Quisp, and Super Sugar Crisp.


13 posted on 06/27/2007 12:57:00 PM PDT by ZGuy (Democrats : Corrupt or deceived. There are no other options.)
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To: JamesP81

Cinnamon?

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Cinnamon_helps_check_blood_sugar/articleshow/2140033.cms

Cinnamon helps check blood sugar

22 Jun, 2007 l 0029 hrs IST

TIMES NEWS NETWORK

NEW DELHI: A dash of cinnamon on your daily dessert could help keep your blood sugar under check.
The world’s oldest spice, that was once considered a gift fit for kings, has been found to be highly effective against post-meal blood sugar rise.

Researchers from the Malmo University Hospital in Sweden have found that adding one teaspoon of cinnamon to a bowl of rice pudding helped lower blood sugar rise in a team of healthy volunteers.

The findings, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition on Thursday, add to evidence from past studies that cinnamon may aid in diabetes, a disorder in which blood sugar levels soar because the body cannot properly use the sugar-regulating hormone insulin.

The team led by Dr Joanna Hlebowicz based its findings on 14 healthy volunteers, each of whom had their blood sugar measured before and after eating a bowl of rice pudding having cinnamon.

Post-pudding blood tests, which were taken at intervals of two hours, showed that the volunteers’ blood sugar rose much lesser after consuming cinnamon dessert.

According to Hlebowicz’s team, this could be because cinnamon slows the rate at which food passes from the stomach to the intestines.

Using ultrasound scans, they found that the volunteers showed a slower rate of gastric emptying when they ate the cinnamon rice pudding.

Hlebowicz said previous studies found that when people with type 2 diabetes added cinnamon to their diets for 40 days, their blood sugar and cholesterol levels tended to dip. On the other hand, a recent study found no such benefits among people with type 1 diabetes.

Cinnamon, which has a long history both as a spice and a medicine, is also known to lower triglyceride and cholesterol levels.

A quarter teaspoon of cinnamon powder added to desserts or sprinkled on hot cereals or buttered toast twice daily is known to be beneficial.

Cinnamon has unique anti-clotting actions and also qualifies as an anti-microbial food that stops the growth of bacteria as well as fungi.

Cinnamon’s unique scent is known to boost brain activity and is also an excellent source of manganese, dietary fibre, iron and calcium.

Calcium and fibre bind bile salts and thereby reduce the risk of colon cancer.

A recent study published by researchers from the US department of agriculture said cinnamon reduced the proliferation of leukemia and lymphoma cancer cells.

In a study at Copenhagen University, patients given half a teaspoon of cinnamon powder combined with one tablespoon of honey every morning before breakfast had significant relief in arthritis pain after one week.
Further studies focusing on people with diabetes are still needed, Hlebowicz and her colleagues concluded.


14 posted on 06/27/2007 12:57:58 PM PDT by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
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To: ZGuy

Fruit Loops has been and will always be MY favourite!.......


15 posted on 06/27/2007 1:08:09 PM PDT by Red Badger (Bite your tongue. It tastes a lot better than crow................)
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To: Red Badger

I had a Tedy Bear Hampster as a youngster. His diet was Fruit Loops and walnuts. The little creature lived to the ripe old age of 6 years. BTW, he could shove 23 fruit loops into his food pouches.


16 posted on 06/27/2007 1:35:19 PM PDT by A_Tradition_Continues (Opinions expressed are those of an 18 y.o. male.)
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To: ZGuy
Kellogg recently announced that it would put an upper limit on sugar for cereals and all the foods it markets to children.

Translation: serving size is going down.

17 posted on 06/27/2007 1:35:50 PM PDT by KarlInOhio (A base looking for a party.)
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To: A_Tradition_Continues

6 years is old for a hamster..........Ours was eaten by a neighbor’s cat when he made a run for it by escaping out of his cage........


18 posted on 06/27/2007 1:37:44 PM PDT by Red Badger (Bite your tongue. It tastes a lot better than crow................)
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To: KarlInOhio; ZGuy
Kellogg recently announced that it would put an upper limit on sugar for cereals and all the foods it markets to children. Translation: serving size is going down.

Translation: UPPER LIMIT = 100%............

19 posted on 06/27/2007 1:38:49 PM PDT by Red Badger (Bite your tongue. It tastes a lot better than crow................)
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To: Jaysun
"I eat a good bit of granulated sugar every morning, about enough to fill a coffee cup. I’ve never felt or looked better in my life."

That will change. Refined sugar is really just the sweetest of all poisons.
The average American consumes their bodywieght in refined sugar every year, plus an additional 20 lbs of corn syrup.
Refined sugar damages vital organs in the body by this gross intake of sugar.

The Sweetest Poison of All

Read it. Hopefully you will discover you don't feel that 'great' after all. You should really try to avoid regular sugar intake. It can kill you.

20 posted on 06/27/2007 2:38:48 PM PDT by Nathan Zachary
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To: Nextrush
"I always like the expression “balanced diet.”

That's a reasonable way of thinking, as long as you are eating FOOD. Refined sugar is not a food. it has no nutritional value at all. You are best to elimiate it from your diet completely. It truly is a sweet poison. It's ok to have some once in a while, like a pop once in a week or less often, a candy bar. If you must have sweets, eat sweet foods like fruits, or stuff sweetened with fructose.

21 posted on 06/27/2007 2:51:49 PM PDT by Nathan Zachary
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To: Nathan Zachary
Read it. Hopefully you will discover you don't feel that 'great' after all. You should really try to avoid regular sugar intake. It can kill you.

Thanks. I've seen that article before. I'm afraid that I don't buy it.
22 posted on 06/27/2007 3:03:43 PM PDT by Jaysun (It's like people who hate corn bread and hate anchovies, but love cornchovie bread.)
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To: Nathan Zachary

Google this mysterious doctor; every hit in every language leads you back to the single article and every entry is from one of these “supplements will make you healthy, wealthy and dumb enough to buy what we sell” sites that prey on the sick and elderly.

This Martin guy seems to have no history beyond this one writing.


23 posted on 06/27/2007 3:17:02 PM PDT by Old Professer (The critic writes with rapier pen, dips it twice, and writes again.)
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To: Jaysun

Without being a member of AMA or a subscriber to JAMA i can’t read the only obit I could find; but he did die August 24, 1997.

There were a great number of ‘back to nature’ successful people in the late 50s and 60s, some up to the 70s and today who think you can eat your way to eternity but reality will show that they all see the shovel before they see salvation.


24 posted on 06/27/2007 3:28:40 PM PDT by Old Professer (The critic writes with rapier pen, dips it twice, and writes again.)
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To: Jaysun

Then read other articles, such as the first link provided.

If you ‘don’t buy’ the FACT that sugar is nothing but empty, useless calories, that’s unfortunate. You just can’t find any more simple a truth as that.

The simple fact remains however, that sugar is not a food.


25 posted on 06/27/2007 3:58:02 PM PDT by Nathan Zachary
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To: Old Professer
that's strange, the article I'm reading lists several sources doctors and scientists. Has nothing to do with 'back to nature" people or ideas.

http://www.nexusmagazine.com/articles/sugarblues.html

But, if you insist, refined sugar is wonderful, healthy stuff. eat as much as you can. It contains all the vitmins, minerals you need.

The hell with facts. America's growing diabetes epidemic and large butts, sickly, fat children are solid proof of just how wonderfull refined sugar is, a true miracle of american frood processing.

26 posted on 06/27/2007 4:06:31 PM PDT by Nathan Zachary
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To: ZGuy
I ate captain crunch two weeks ago for the first time in my life. It was late, I was starving, at a friends house, and ate probably 6 large handfuls without milk.

When I woke up the next morning I felt like I had a hangover. Kids’ breakfast cereal is pure poison. You might as well feed them strawberry daiquiris and flintstone vitamins.

27 posted on 06/27/2007 4:13:18 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
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To: A_Tradition_Continues
I raised them when I was a kid. I fed mine birdseed. I bought the kind with extra sunflower kernels. Sometimes I fed them chicken feed. I used to sell them for a dollar and a nickel each.

6 years is a long time for a hamster. Average was 3.5 years I think.

28 posted on 06/27/2007 4:18:13 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
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To: Red Badger

Crunchatize me Captain!!!!!!!!


29 posted on 06/27/2007 4:26:27 PM PDT by Xenophon450 (Ah, the liberals, they are numerous but not good for much.)
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To: ZGuy
Most breakfast cereals are fortified with numerous essential vitamins and minerals...

True. However, LOL, they have to be "fortified" in order to legally sell the product as FOOD. That's because, of course, the product without "fortification" is DEVOID of any vitamin or mineral nutrients & packed with acrylimides & other cancer-causing agents from the high-temp manufacturing process! So they "FORTIFY" it.

For anyone who wants to "Eat To Live" a copy of Dr. Fuhrman's book by the same title is available at "www.drfuhrman.com"...plus lots of other info about the health-promoting reality of a diet that maximizes Nutrients Per Calorie.

30 posted on 06/27/2007 4:32:57 PM PDT by O Neill (Aye, Katie Scarlett, the ONLY thing that lasts is the land...)
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To: Nathan Zachary
Then read other articles, such as the first link provided.

If you ‘don’t buy’ the FACT that sugar is nothing but empty, useless calories, that’s unfortunate. You just can’t find any more simple a truth as that.

The simple fact remains however, that sugar is not a food.


As a Christian it would be awfully hypocritical of me to talk about all of the wonderful things that await us after death while also doing everything within my power to extend my life. No? Okay that's crazy - forget I said it. I'll keep looking. Death by sugar would be a very embarrassing way to go. It's so unmanly.
31 posted on 06/27/2007 8:50:29 PM PDT by Jaysun (It's like people who hate corn bread and hate anchovies, but love cornchovie bread.)
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To: Nathan Zachary

That’s idiotic; what I am saying is that on any of the sites where he is linked, this same article crops up as though it has the imprimatur of the entire medical community attached to it when the AMA has made no such statement.

Certainly, no one suggests that one make a steady diet of refined white sugar but to label it a poison is a position far removed from common sense dietary advice or practice.

It remains a physical fact that no matter what you eat, your system converts it to glucose before “combusting” it.

It is entirely possible to subsist on glucose and supplements but ordinary food works quite nicely for most and supplements are unnecessary in those who have a balanced diet.


32 posted on 06/28/2007 9:32:15 AM PDT by Old Professer (The critic writes with rapier pen, dips it twice, and writes again.)
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To: mamelukesabre

They’re a lot more tender when they’re only about 6 months old; deep fried with cracker crumbs and poultry seasoning works really well.


33 posted on 06/28/2007 9:34:38 AM PDT by Old Professer (The critic writes with rapier pen, dips it twice, and writes again.)
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