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Japan Official Resigns Over A-Bomb Quip
AP via ABC News ^ | Jul 3, 2007

Posted on 07/02/2007 9:48:33 PM PDT by james500

Japan's embattled defense minister resigned Tuesday over his comments suggesting the 1945 atomic bombings Hiroshima and Nagasaki were inevitable, news reports said. Fumio Kyuma had come under intense criticism from survivors of the bombing following the comments made over the weekend. He had apologized.

Broadcaster NHK and NTV carried news of the resignation.

(Excerpt) Read more at abcnews.go.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Japan; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: bataan; nanking; nogooddeed; pearlharbor; revolutionaryact; theyasked4it; theydeservedit; theygotit; tojo; truthteller

1 posted on 07/02/2007 9:48:34 PM PDT by james500
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To: james500

Guess political correctness runs amuck in Japan also.


2 posted on 07/02/2007 9:50:57 PM PDT by taxesareforever (Never forget Matt Maupin)
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To: james500

At least he didn’t kill himself.

Regards


3 posted on 07/02/2007 9:51:17 PM PDT by ARE SOLE (Agents Ramos and Campean are in prison at this very moment..)
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To: james500

What’s Michael Kinsley’s old line...a politician makes a gaffe when he inadvertently speaks the truth?


4 posted on 07/02/2007 9:51:22 PM PDT by RichInOC (...somebody was going to say it...why not me?)
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To: james500

Didn’t Yamamoto pretty much say the same thing right after Pearl Harbor?


5 posted on 07/02/2007 9:52:26 PM PDT by dfwgator (The University of Florida - Still Championship U)
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To: ARE SOLE

“At least he didn’t kill himself.”

The night is young.


6 posted on 07/02/2007 9:53:50 PM PDT by james500
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To: james500

Truth is illegal in Japan.


7 posted on 07/02/2007 9:59:32 PM PDT by ozzymandus
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To: dfwgator; SunkenCiv; Pharmboy

Yamamoto ...before Pearl Harbor ?


8 posted on 07/02/2007 10:02:32 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: ozzymandus

I think Seppuku is also illegal in Japan.


9 posted on 07/02/2007 10:03:34 PM PDT by BlueStateRefugee
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To: james500; TigerLikesRooster; Jet Jaguar; Tamar1973; All

Tiger did you hear about this


10 posted on 07/02/2007 10:06:32 PM PDT by SevenofNine ("We are Freepers, all your media belong to us, resistence is futile")
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To: dfwgator

It would have been difficult for Yamamoto Kantoku to specifically say that, since Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings did not occur until after his own death and way after Pearl Harbor.


11 posted on 07/02/2007 10:15:03 PM PDT by AmericanInTokyo (Sad so many members of the World's Policeman--our fellow Americans--know little about their "beat")
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To: james500

Considering that Japan was developing an atomic weapon of their own, a nuclear bomb WAS inevitable.

It’s sad when speaking the truth costs you your job.


12 posted on 07/02/2007 10:16:03 PM PDT by Don W ("Well Done" is far better to hear than "Well Said". (Samuel Clemens))
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To: AmericanInTokyo

While Yamamoto may not have known the means, I’m sure he realized that in the end, it would be ugly for Japan.


13 posted on 07/02/2007 10:17:23 PM PDT by dfwgator (The University of Florida - Still Championship U)
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To: george76

:’) One of the top Japanese generals, maybe it was Yamamoto, said (after Pearl Harbor) that he feared that they had awakened a sleeping giant. Given the hideous treatment of captives (US, Chinese, etc) and occupied territories, had the US had more nukes and literally wiped Japan off the face of the Earth, the rest of the Orient would have spit on the bodies and cheered. By the time of the Hiroshima bomb, incendiary bombings had destroyed more than 40 Japanese cities. And even after the first Bomb, the Japanese didn’t surrender. Only after the Nagasaki bomb (and more incendiary bombings, if memory serves) did Hirohito inform his warlords that Japan would surrender. It took TWO nukes to convince him. Even then, a group of Japanese officers conspired to nab the Emperor at night, stop the prerecorded surrender broadcast from going out, and force Japan to fight on. Due to a US bomber run, electricity was shut down (precautionary measure), and the conspirators got lost in the dark of the palace. (’:


14 posted on 07/02/2007 10:19:23 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Time heals all wounds, particularly when they're not yours. Profile updated June 28, 2007.)
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To: ARE SOLE

-—At least he didn’t kill himself.-—

Yet.


15 posted on 07/02/2007 10:26:48 PM PDT by claudiustg (You know it. I know it.)
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To: SunkenCiv; rlmorel
I thought that Yamamoto had spent extensive time in the west ( incl USA ). He apparently said that Japan would awaken the giant and then Japan would lose.

He was against the attack for strategic reasons even though he did the tactical planning.

I could be wrong ?

16 posted on 07/02/2007 10:26:58 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: james500

bump


17 posted on 07/02/2007 10:27:13 PM PDT by Cacique (quos Deus vult perdere, prius dementat ( Islamia Delenda Est ))
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To: james500

the..world..is..upside..down
japdude..pretty..much..speaks..a..fair..and..objective..truth

and..gets..hammered???

WTF?


18 posted on 07/02/2007 10:37:47 PM PDT by himno hero
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To: james500

I was shocked to learn that Japan had gotten so far as to detonate their own A bomb in a test in North Korea when we dropped two on them...


19 posted on 07/02/2007 10:41:37 PM PDT by Dogbert41
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To: SevenofNine

Yes.


20 posted on 07/02/2007 10:44:41 PM PDT by TigerLikesRooster (kim jong-il, chia head, ppogri, In Grim Reaper we trust)
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To: Dogbert41

“I was shocked to learn that Japan had gotten so far as to detonate their own A bomb in a test in North Korea when we dropped two on them...”

Really? That’s news to me. Figures with all the sorts of junk they were trying to throw at us in those last days of the the war that they’d at least try and use it against us. Is there some website that I can go to to get more info on this?


21 posted on 07/02/2007 10:53:51 PM PDT by Constantine XI Palaeologus ("Vicisti, Galilaee")
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To: SunkenCiv

IIRC
The full quote was: “I fear we have awakened a sleeping giant, and filled him with a terrible resolve.”


22 posted on 07/02/2007 11:01:35 PM PDT by E.Allen
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To: james500

On the way back to Vietnam a few years ago, we flew over Hiroshima at about 2am local time. Looking down at her lights I said a short prayer for the innocents who had died or lost family there, though still in my realization of how inevitable and necessary it had been.


23 posted on 07/02/2007 11:04:19 PM PDT by onedoug
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To: taxesareforever

Bull Halsey was right.


24 posted on 07/02/2007 11:12:03 PM PDT by BigCinBigD (You "abort" bad missile launches and carrier landings. Not babies.)
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To: onedoug
When you go to war with a country, no one is innocent. This PC war fighting started with Viet Nam. When my father dropped bombs on Germans, he didn't care if it was a school, hospital, or ammo dump, they were Germans and would kill him if given the chance. Many of his buddies bailed out and were killed by housewives with butcher knives and children with pitch forks.

If America is attacked, I will be as dangerous as any military unit to the invader. I don't really believe the throat cutters will give me or my family quarter because we are "innocent". It should teach us that we are responsible for our leaders actions. If Hugo Chavez wants to take on the US, are we going to fret every time we have to drop a bomb? That's why we haven't won a war since WWII. Look at Korea. We are still having problems with them because we didn't fight an unlimited war until they said "uncle".

25 posted on 07/02/2007 11:23:26 PM PDT by chuckles
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To: chuckles

You’re absolutely right. Though what’s belief worth if it isn’t still hard to think of frying children.


26 posted on 07/02/2007 11:29:03 PM PDT by onedoug
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To: chuckles

Very well said - full stop!!


27 posted on 07/02/2007 11:33:52 PM PDT by jws3sticks (Hillary can take a very long walk on a very short pier, anytime, and the sooner the better!)
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To: All
Why Truman Dropped the Bomb
28 posted on 07/02/2007 11:36:38 PM PDT by BushMeister ("We are a nation that has a government - not the other way around." --Ronald Reagan)
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To: james500; maikeru; Dr. Marten; Eric in the Ozarks; Al Gator; snowsislander; sushiman; ...
Gotta keep the war victim/peace daze mentality going...

日本*ピング* (kono risuto ni hairitai ka detai wo shirasete kudasai : let me know if you want on or off this list)

29 posted on 07/02/2007 11:41:03 PM PDT by DTogo (I haven't left the GOP, the GOP left me.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Just in the nick of time because #3 AKA “Fat bastard” was it’s way. ;-)


30 posted on 07/02/2007 11:51:30 PM PDT by miliantnutcase
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To: AmericanInTokyo
He had also spent years in the United States and Britain as part of the delegations at the Washington and London Naval Talks. These years had given him a firsthand look at American industrial might and moral character, and was convinced to the very center of his being that the only way to possibly win the war he was ordered to prosecute was by a gamble.

An all-out air raid on the American naval headquarters in the Pacific, Pearl Harbor. Win in the first 24 hours, then negotiate a settlement favorable to Japan while the US was weak. At this, even, he was dubious. Asked by the Crown Prince to assess the odds of winning the war, he replied, "If necessary, I can run wild for the first six months. Beyond that I have no hope."

As the success of the Pearl Harbor Raid became clear on December 7th, 1941, his staff congratulated him. Yamamoto was on the Combined Fleet flagship, the battleship Nagato, sitting silently with eyes closed along the wall. He rose and said, "I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve." Then he excused himself and walked out on to the deck of the Nagato, where he stared out at the sea.


Source.

So sorry. Nothing from the archives of the Japanese Imperial Navy. The bold section is widely quoted, but may be fictitious.
31 posted on 07/03/2007 1:08:10 AM PDT by caveat emptor
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To: onedoug
I don't think any "human" desires to harm anyone. Sometimes you just have to do what needs to be done. War is one of those things that, IMHO, needs to be as horrible as possible, as quickly as possible, to end it sooner. Sterile wars tend to last forever. I'm waiting for the "final solution" for the Jews. One day the Rags will push too far and someone like Netenyahu will push the bastards into the sea and dare anyone to say anything about it.

Try to imagine American politicians that are attacked every day minding their own business and the restraint Israel has shown. No US pol could survive if they didn't eventually wipe them off the map.

Iraq would have been over a long time ago if we lined the bastids up against a wall and started shooting until someone named some names. Now we have the name( Mookie Sadr), and he still breathes. If we don't kill him and his followers, the 3500 dead will mean nothing when we turn Iraq over to the Iranians. When we publicly shoot Sadr, we need to shoot every bastard that even coughs when we feed his carcass to the swine. That is called "pacification".

32 posted on 07/03/2007 1:13:28 AM PDT by chuckles
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To: george76

No, I think you are correct, george76.


33 posted on 07/03/2007 3:25:38 AM PDT by rlmorel (Liberals: If the Truth would help them, they would use it.)
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To: Dogbert41
"...I was shocked to learn that Japan had gotten so far as to detonate their own A bomb in a test in North Korea when we dropped two on them..."

No, there is no truth to that. Where did you hear that, dogbert41?

34 posted on 07/03/2007 3:27:58 AM PDT by rlmorel (Liberals: If the Truth would help them, they would use it.)
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To: james500
Bluntness is not particularly valued in Japan.

Kyuma using a very blunt "shogunai" was perhaps too much for Japanese sensibilities; however, I am a little surprised about the lady that they have chosen for the next defense minister.

While Koike doesn't seem to be a Tanaka-san (I mean the daughter, not the prime minister), it seems odd to me that she went to the University of Cairo of all places.

35 posted on 07/03/2007 3:41:23 AM PDT by snowsislander
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To: BlueStateRefugee
I think Seppuku is also illegal in Japan.

What's the penalty -- imprisonment or death?

36 posted on 07/03/2007 3:42:53 AM PDT by Quiller (When you're fighting to survive, there is no "try" -- there is only do, or do not.)
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To: james500
Where is the Japanese outrage from all of the radiation clouds from all of the Chinese and Soviet Nuclear bomb testing? I lived in Japan from 1959-1963 and there was one week we couldn't even go outside because of the high amount of radiation coming from one of the Soviet detonations. My father was in the USAF and his unit monitored the radiation and he told me it was dangerously high several times.

The Japanese are hypocrites.

37 posted on 07/03/2007 5:49:38 AM PDT by vetvetdoug
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To: Dogbert41
“I was shocked to learn that Japan had gotten so far as to detonate their own A bomb in a test in North Korea when we dropped two on them...”

Oh yeah? Just where did you learn that? In any case they were lying to you. Germany was closer to having a nuclear bomb than Japan was, but neither ever got close to testing one.

38 posted on 07/03/2007 6:58:26 AM PDT by monday
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To: Quiller

Imprisonment, then death.


39 posted on 07/03/2007 7:02:26 AM PDT by BlueStateRefugee
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To: onedoug

Just remember, if you don’t fry theirs and stop them they will surely fry you and yours.


40 posted on 07/03/2007 9:34:35 AM PDT by RJS1950 (The democrats are the "enemies foreign and domestic" cited in the federal oath)
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To: james500
Japan's embattled defense minister resigned Tuesday over his comments
suggesting the 1945 atomic bombings Hiroshima and Nagasaki were
inevitable, news reports said.


Well, as one writer said "Man is an animal that can stand only
so much truth.".

Kudos to the poor fellow for having the courage to commit a
revolutionary act: telling the truth.
41 posted on 07/03/2007 9:38:39 AM PDT by VOA
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To: taxesareforever
Guess political correctness runs amuck in Japan also.

Constantly claiming "victim status" is the fig leaf many Japanese
wear so they can appear in public without blushing.

Or admitting to The Rape of Nanking or the death of Allied
soldiers and innocent Asians under the forced labor imposed by
the followers of The Emperor.

On the PBS episode of "Secrets of The Dead" on the Bridge Over
The River Kwai, a Japanese officer/engineer that ran the railway building
had photos of his wonderful wartime accomplishments.
He said that no Allied soldiers were used in building part of
the system he supervised...BUT, the photos he brought along clearly
showed US or Commonwealth POWs in the background of the photos.
42 posted on 07/03/2007 9:44:34 AM PDT by VOA
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To: VOA

I never thought of it that way and you are absolutely right. When was the last time I heard anyone from Japan apologize or say anything about being at fault in WWII? I take that back, when was the first time. I never have.


43 posted on 07/03/2007 10:07:15 AM PDT by taxesareforever (Never forget Matt Maupin)
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To: george76

I dunno offhand. :’) Yamamoto was considered the great mastermind behind Japanese naval successes, and was tracked and finally assassinated (his plane shot down). The Japanese spent years building one of the largest navies in the world (perhaps it was *the* largest?) then lost much of it in just a handful of large (but not quite large enough) engagements. The Midway defeat probably would not have happened had that ridiculous feint toward the Aleutians not taken place, even with the US having broken the Japanese codes. The US victory at Midway was a close-run thing, and regardless of fighting spirit, a bit more Japanese firepower could easily have made the difference. The Japanese people weren’t told the significance, details, and extent of the Midway defeat until the middle of the 1950s.


44 posted on 07/03/2007 10:13:49 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Time heals all wounds, particularly when they're not yours. Profile updated June 28, 2007.)
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To: taxesareforever

Cowardice?


45 posted on 07/03/2007 10:14:38 AM PDT by Old Professer (The critic writes with rapier pen, dips it twice, and writes again.)
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To: taxesareforever
I never thought of it that way and you are absolutely right. When was the last time I heard anyone from Japan apologize or say anything about being at fault in WWII? I take that back, when was the first time. I never have.

Here's a list of the last 35 years of apologies from the Japanese government, courtesy of the Wikipedia page "List of War Apology Statements Issued by Japan":


List of war apology statements issued by Japan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Contents

[]

[edit] 1970s

[edit] 1980s

  • 24 August 1982. Prime Minister Zenko Suzuki. "I am painfully aware of Japan's responsibility for inflicting serious damages [on Asian nations] during the past war." "We need to recognize that there are criticisms that condemn [Japan's occupation] as invasion" (Press Conference on Textbook issue. qtd. in Tahara, Soichiro (田原総一朗). Nihon no Senso (日本の戦争). Shogakkan, 2000: Tokyo, Japan. p. 161.)
  • 26 August 1982. Chief Cabinet Secretary Kiichi Miyazawa. "1. The Japanese Government and the Japanese people are deeply aware of the fact that acts by our country in the past caused tremendous suffering and damage to the peoples of Asian countries, including the Republic of Korea (ROK) and China, and have followed the path of a pacifist state with remorse and determination that such acts must never be repeated. Japan has recognized, in the Japan-ROK Joint Communique, of 1965, that the 'past relations are regrettable, and Japan feels deep remorse,' and in the Japan-China Joint Communique, that Japan is 'keenly conscious of the responsibility for the serious damage that Japan caused in the past to the Chinese people through war and deeply reproaches itself.' These statements confirm Japan's remorse and determination which I stated above and this recognition has not changed at all to this day. 2. This spirit in the Japan-ROK Joint Communique, and the Japan-China Joint Communique, naturally should also be respected in Japan's school education and textbook authorization. Recently, however, the Republic of Korea, China, and others have been criticizing some descriptions in Japanese textbooks. From the perspective of building friendship and goodwill with neighboring countries, Japan will pay due attention to these criticisms and make corrections at the Government's responsibility. 3. To this end, in relation to future authorization of textbooks, the Government will revise the Guideline for Textbook Authorization after discussions in the Textbook Authorization and Research Council and give due consideration to the effect mentioned above. Regarding textbooks that have already been authorized, Government will take steps quickly to the same effect. As measures until then, the Minister of Education, Sports, Science and Culture will express his views and make sure that the idea mentioned in 2. Above is duly reflected in the places of education. 4. Japan intends to continue to make efforts to promote mutual understanding and develop friendly and cooperative relations with neighboring countries and to contribute to the peace and stability of Asia and, in turn, of the world" (Statement on History Textbooks. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site), Retrieved from http://www.mofa.go.jp/policy/postwar/state8208.html ).
  • 7 September 1984. Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone. "There was a period in this century when Japan brought to bear great sufferings upon your country and its people. I would like to state here that the government and people of Japan feel a deep regret for this error" ( Economist, September 15, 1984).

[edit] 1990s

  • 18 April 1990. Minister of Foreign Affairs Taro Nakayama. "Japan is deeply sorry for the tragedy in which these (Korean) people were moved to Sakhalin not of their own free will but by the design of the Japanese government and had to remain there after the conclusion of the war" (188th National Diet Session Lower House Committee of Foreign Affairs. qtd. in Kenichi Takagi, Rethinking Japan's Postwar Compensation: Voices of Victims. tr. by Makiko Nakano. Retrieved from http://home.att.ne.jp/sun/RUR55/E/epage16.htm ).
  • 25 May 1990. Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu. "I would like to take the opportunity here to humbly reflect upon how the people of the Korean Peninsula went through unbearable pain and sorrow as a result of our country's actions during a certain period in the past and to express that we are sorry" (Summit meeting with President Roh Tae Woo in Japan. 大韓民国大統領盧泰愚閣下ご夫妻歓迎晩餐会での海部内閣総理大臣の挨拶. 海部演説集 pp. 326-328. qtd in The World and Japan Database Project website, Institute of Oriental Culture, University of Tokyo, Retrieved from http://www.ioc.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~worldjpn/documents/texts/JPKR/19900525.S1J.html ).
  • 16 January 1992. Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa. "We the Japanese people, first and foremost, have to bear in our mind the fact that your people experienced unbearable suffering and sorrow during a certain period in the past because of our nation's act, and never forget the feeling of remorse. I, as a prime minister, would like to once again express a heartful remorse and apology to the people of your nation" (Speech at dinner with President Roh Tae Woo. 大韓民国大統領盧泰愚閣下ご夫妻主催晩餐会での宮澤内閣総理大臣のスピーチ. 宮澤演説集 pp. 89-91. qtd in The World and Japan Database Project website, Institute of Oriental Culture, University of Tokyo, Retrieved from http://www.ioc.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~worldjpn/documents/texts/JPKR/19920116.S1J.html ).
  • 17 January 1992. Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa. "What we should not forget about relationship between our nation and your nation is a fact that there was a certain period in the thousands of years of our company when we were the victimizer and you were the victim. I would like to once again express a heartful remorse and apology for the unbearable suffering and sorrow that you experienced during this period because of our nation's act." Recently the issue of the so-called 'wartime comfort women' is being brought up. I think that incidents like this are seriously heartbreaking, and I am truly sorry" (Policy speech at the occasion of the visit to the Republic of Korea. 宮澤喜一内閣総理大臣の大韓民国訪問における政策演説(アジアのなか、世界のなかの日韓関係). 外交青書36号,383-388. qtd in The World and Japan Database Project website, Institute of Oriental Culture, University of Tokyo, Retrieved from http://www.ioc.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~worldjpn/documents/texts/exdpm/19920117.S1J.html ).
  • 6 July 1992. Chief Cabinet Secretary Koichi Kato. "The Government again would like to express its sincere apology and remorse to all those who have suffered indescribable hardship as so-called 'wartime comfort women,' irrespective of their nationality or place of birth. With profound remorse and determination that such a mistake must never be repeated, Japan will maintain its stance as a pacifist nation and will endeavor to build up new future-oriented relations with the Republic of Korea and with other countries and regions in Asia. As I listen to many people, I feel truly grieved for this issue. By listening to the opinions of people from various directions, I would like to consider sincerely in what way we can express our feelings to those who suffered such hardship" (Statement by Chief Cabinet Secretary Koichi Kato on the Issue of the so-called "Wartime Comfort Women" from the Korean Peninsula. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site), Retrieved from http://www.mofa.go.jp/policy/postwar/state9207.html ).
  • 4 August 1993. Chief Cabinet Secretary Yohei Kono. "Undeniably, this was an act, with the involvement of the military authorities of the day, that severely injured the honor and dignity of many women. The Government of Japan would like to take this opportunity once again to extend its sincere apologies and remorse to all those, irrespective of place of origin, who suffered immeasurable pain and incurable physical and psychological wounds as comfort women" (Statement by the Chief Cabinet Secretary Yohei Kono on the result of the study on the issue of "comfort women." (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site), Retrieved from http://www.mofa.go.jp/policy/women/fund/state9308.html ).
  • 11 August 1993. Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa. "I myself believe it was a war of aggression, a war that was wrong" (First Press Conference after inauguration. qtd. in Margot S. Strom, Facing History and Ourselves: Holocaust and Human Behavior. p. 488).
  • 23 August 1993. Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa. "After 48 years from then, our nation has become one of nations that enjoy prosperity and peace. We must not forget that it is founded on the ultimate sacrifices in the last war, and a product of the achievements of the people of the previous generations. We would like to take this opportunity to clearly express our remorse for the past and a new determination to the world. Firstly at this occasion, we would like to express our deep remorse and apology for the fact that invasion and colonial rule by our nation in the past brought to bear great sufferings and sorrow upon many people" (Speech at 127th National Diet Session. 第127回国会(特別会)細川護熙内閣総理大臣 所信表明演説. (The World and Japan Database Project website, Institute of Oriental Culture, University of Tokyo) Retrieved from http://www.ioc.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~worldjpn/documents/texts/pm/19930823.SWJ.html ).
  • 24 September 1993. Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa. "I used the expression war of aggression and act of aggression to express honestly my recognition which is the same as the one that the act of our nation in the past brought to bear unbearable sufferings and sorrow upon many people, and to express once again deep remorse and apology" (128th National Diet Session. 第128回国会. (国会会議録検索システム (National Diet Conference Minutes Search system)), Retrieved from http://kokkai.ndl.go.jp ).
  • 31 August 1994. Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama. "Japan's actions in a certain period of the past not only claimed numerous victims here in Japan but also left the peoples of neighboring Asia and elsewhere with scars that are painful even today. I am thus taking this opportunity to state my belief, based on my profound remorse for these acts of aggression, colonial rule, and the like caused such unbearable suffering and sorrow for so many people, that Japan's future path should be one of making every effort to build world peace in line with my no-war commitment. It is imperative for us Japanese to look squarely to our history with the peoples of neighboring Asia and elsewhere. Only with solid basis of mutual understanding and confidence that can be build through overcoming the pain on both sides, can we and the peoples of neighboring countries together clear up the future of Asia-Pacific.... On the issue of wartime 'comfort women,' which seriously stained the honor and dignity of many women, I would like to take this opportunity once again to express my profound and sincere remorse and apologies. With regard to this issue as well, I believe that one way of demonstrating such feelings of apologies and remorse is to work to further promote mutual understanding with the countries and areas concerned as well as to face squarely to the past and ensure that it is rightly conveyed to future generations. This initiative, in this sense, has been drawn up consistent with such belief" (Statement by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama on the "Peace, Friendship, and Exchange Initiative" (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site), Retrieved from http://www.mofa.go.jp/announce/press/pm/murayama/state9408.html ).
  • 07/na/1995. Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama. "The problem of the so-called wartime comfort women is one such scar, which, with the involvement of the Japanese military forces of the time, seriously stained the honor and dignity of many women. This is entirely inexcusable. I offer my profound apology to all those who, as wartime comfort women, suffered emotional and physical wounds that can never be closed" (Statement by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama on the occasion of the establishment of the "Asian Women's Fund." (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site), Retrieved from http://www.mofa.go.jp/policy/women/fund/state9507.html ).
  • 23 June 1996. Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto. Hashimoto mentioned the aspects of Japan's colonial rule of the Korean Peninsula such as the forced Japanization of Korean people's name and commented "It is beyond imagination how this injured the hearts of Korean people" Hashimoto also touched on the issue of Korean comfort women and said "Nothing injured the honor and dignity of women more than this and I would like to extend words of deep remorse and the heartfelt apology" (Joint press conference at summit meeting with President Kim Young Sam in South Korea. 日韓共同記者会見(橋本総理大臣・金泳三大統領共同記者会見). (Official website of Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet), Retrieved from http://www.kantei.go.jp/jp/hasimotosouri/speech/1996/kisya-0625.html ).
  • 8 October 1996. Emperor Akihito. "There was a period when our nation brought to bear great sufferings upon the people of the Korean Peninsula." "The deep sorrow that I feel over this will never be forgotten" (Speech at dinner with President Kim Dae Jung of the Republic of Korea. 宮中晩餐会での今上天皇の金大中大統領歓迎の勅語. (Nakano Bunko), Retrieved from http://www.geocities.jp/nakanolib/choku/ch10.htm ).
  • 28 August 1997. Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto. "I believe that Japan has learned its lessons from history and that the people of Japan widely share the view that we must learn from the past for the future, without forgetting what is behind us. The year before last, former Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama issued these words: '... through its colonial rule and aggression, [Japan] caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, particularly to those of Asian nations. ... I regard, in a spirit of humility, these irrefutable facts of history, and express here once again my feelings of deep remorse and state my heartfelt apology.' I am of the same mind as the former Prime Minister. Even though there are some elements in Japan that are quite capable of arousing Chinese sentiment with their rhetoric, Japan will not become a military power in the future. Our determination to continue treading the path of a peaceful nation is self-evident to us, the Japanese people. Still, however clear this may be to us, we must continue our persistent efforts so that China and the other nations of Asia have no reason to doubt us" (Speech by Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto, Seeking a New Foreign Policy Toward China. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site), Retrieved from http://www.mofa.go.jp/region/asia-paci/china/seeking.html ).
  • 6 September 1997. Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto. "In 1995, on the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II, the Government of Japan expressed its resolution through the statement by the Prime Minister, which states that during a certain period in the past, Japan's conduct caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, including China, and the Prime Minister expressed his feeling of deep remorse and stated his heartfelt apology, while giving his word to make efforts for peace. I myself was one of the ministers who was involved in drafting this statement. I would like to repeat that this is the official position of the Government of Japan. During the summit meeting that I had during my visit to China, I have made this point very clear in a frank manner to the Chinese side. Premier Li Peng said that he concurs completely with my remarks" (Ministry of Foreign Affairs Press Conference on: Visit of Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto to the People's Republic of China. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site), Retrieved from http://www.mofa.go.jp/region/asia-paci/china/conference.html ).
  • 13 January 1998. Press Secretary. "Statement by Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto on World War II prisoners of war. Q: At the meeting last night with Prime Minister Blair, did Prime Minister Hashimoto really apologize for the prisoners of war. Spokesman Hashimoto: The important thing is that the Prime Minister of Japan expressed the feelings of deep remorse and stated heartfelt apologies to the people who suffered in World War II directly to the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. This was the second meeting between Prime Minister Hashimoto and Prime Minister Blair and we considered the meeting very important, especially this year. Making use of this opportunity, Prime Minister Hashimoto expressed his remorse and apology on behalf of the Government of Japan; this is very important. Prime Minister Blair fully understands the importance of the statement made by Prime Minister Hashimoto on this issue. His press opportunities after the talks objectively reflect what the two gentlemen talked about" (Press Conference by the Press Secretary. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site), Retrieved from http://www.mofa.go.jp/announce/press/1998/1/113.html ).
  • 16 January 1998. Press Secretary. "Apology to prisoners of war. Q: This week, Prime Minister Hashimoto apologized to British prisoners of war for actions taken during World War II. Does the Japanese Government have any plans to extend that apology to Australian prisoners of war, and if not, why not? Spokesman Tanaka: Our sense of apology and our sense of remorse was addressed to all the countries which have gone through the experiences of the last world war. You may recall that, at the time of the 50th anniversary of World War II, then-Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama issued a statement by the Government of Japan to express its sincere feeling of deep remorse and heartfelt apology for the damages and suffering for the one-time past of Japan. This apology was addressed universally. Since the time of this apology, Prime Minister Tony Blair of the United Kingdom has been elected to his current position and has just concluded a visit to Japan. Therefore, we took the opportunity of this recent visit to once again express our feeling, so that this new bilateral relationship would be cemented in the future. Please be reminded that our apology is extended to all the countries who shared the same disastrous experiences. Q: So, are you saying that Prime Minister Hashimoto's statement from this week was just a restatement of what then-Prime Minister Murayama said on the 50th anniversary? Spokesman Tanaka: No, it is not really a restatement, but a new determination. Every time we make this type of statement, it is our expression of a new determination to build a new era together with other countries, particularly this time with Prime Minister Tony Blair, who is a young, fresh face in the international community and who has shown sufficient capability to lead that country and Europe into the 21st century. So, we wanted to share with him our perception for the new era. Q: So, you do not see a need to extend that apology to particular countries? Spokesman Tanaka: Whenever the opportunity arises and whenever necessary, we do not hesitate to renew our determination" (Press Conference by the Press Secretary. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site), Retrieved from http://www.mofa.go.jp/announce/press/1998/1/116.html ).
  • 15 July 1998. Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto. "The Government of Japan, painfully aware of its moral responsibility concerning the issue of so called "wartime comfort women," has been sincerely addressing this issue in close cooperation with the Asian Women's Fund which implements the projects to express the national atonement on this issue. Recognizing that the issue of comfort women, with an involvement of the Japanese military authorities at that time, was a grave affront to the honor and dignity of large numbers of women, I would like to convey to Your Excellency my most sincere apologies and remorse to all the women who underwent immeasurable and painful experiences and suffered incurable physical and psychological wounds as comfort women.... By the Statement of Prime Minister in 1995, the Government of Japan renewed the feelings of deep remorse and the heartfelt apology for tremendous damage and suffering caused by Japan to the people of many countries including the Netherlands during a certain period in the past. My cabinet has not modified this position at all, and I myself laid a wreath to the Indisch Monument with these feelings on the occasion of my visit to the Netherlands in June last year" (The contents of the letter of the then Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto sent to the Netherlands Prime Minister Willem Kok on July 15, 1998. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site), Retrieved from http://www.mofa.go.jp/policy/women/fund/project0107-3.html ).
  • 8 October 1998. Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi. "Looking back on the relations between Japan and the Republic of Korea during this century, Prime Minister Obuchi regarded in a spirit of humility the fact of history that Japan caused, during a certain period in the past, tremendous damage and suffering to the people of the Republic of Korea through its colonial rule, and expressed his deep remorse and heartfelt apology for this fact. President Kim accepted with sincerity this statement of Prime Minister Obuchi's recognition of history and expressed his appreciation for it. He also expressed his view that the present calls upon both countries to overcome their unfortunate history and to build a future-oriented relationship based on reconciliation as well as good-neighborly and friendly cooperation" (Japan-Republic of Korea Joint Declaration A New Japan-Republic of Korea Partnership towards the Twenty-first Century. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site), Retrieved from http://www.mofa.go.jp/region/asia-paci/korea/joint9810.html ).
  • 26 November 1998. Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi. "Both sides believe that squarely facing the past and correctly understanding history are the important foundation for further developing relations between Japan and China. The Japanese side observes the 1972 Joint Communique of the Government of Japan and the Government of the People's Republic of China and the 15 August 1995 Statement by former Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama. The Japanese side is keenly conscious of the responsibility for the serious distress and damage that Japan caused to the Chinese people through its aggression against China during a certain period in the past and expressed deep remorse for this. The Chinese side hopes that the Japanese side will learn lessons from the history and adhere to the path of peace and development. Based on this, both sides will develop long-standing relations of friendship" (Japan-China Joint Declaration On Building a Partnership of Friendship and Cooperation for Peace and Development. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site), Retrieved from http://www.mofa.go.jp/region/asia-paci/china/visit98/joint.html ).

[edit] 2000s

  • August 10, 2000. Consul-General of Japan in Hong Kong Itaru Umezu. "In fact, Japan has clearly and repeatedly expressed its sincere remorse and apologies, and has dealt sincerely with reparation issues. These apologies were irrefutably expressed, in particular in Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama's official statement in 1995, which was based on a cabinet decision and which has subsequently been upheld by successive prime ministers, including Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori. Mr. Murayama said that Japan 'through its colonial rule and aggression, caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, particularly to those of Asian nations. In the hope that no such mistake be made in the future, I regard, in a spirit of humility, these irrefutable facts of history, and express here once again my feelings of deep remorse and state my heartfelt apology'" (Japan Has Faced Its Past. Far Eastern Economic Review, August 10, 2000. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site) Reprinted at [1].)
  • August 17, 2000. Spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Ryuichiro Yamazaki. "The fact is that Japan has repeatedly expressed its remorse and stated its apology for wartime actions with the utmost clarity. A notable example is then Prime Minister's official statement in August 1995, based upon a Cabinet decision. In the statement, Mr. Murayama said that Japan 'through its colonial rule and aggression, caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, particularly to those of Asian nations,' and he expressed his 'feelings of deep remorse' and stated his 'heartfelt apology.' As recently as 1998, then Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi reiterated gist of this statement to Chinese President Jiang Zeming when he paid a state visit to Japan" (Letter written in response to the article "Miffed Chinese Sue Japan Companies" in New York Times on 7 August 2000. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site) Retrieved from [2].)
  • August 30, 2000. Minister for Foreign Affairs Yohei Kono. "I believe that Japan's perception of history was clearly set out in the Statement by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama issued, following a Cabinet Decision, on the fiftieth anniversary of the end of World War II. As a member of the Cabinet, I participated in the drafting of that Statement. The spirit contained therein has been carried forth by successive administrations and is now the common view of the large number of Japanese people" (Address by Minister for Foreign Affairs Yohei Kono During His Visit to the People's Republic of China. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site) Retrieved from [3].)
  • April 3, 2001. Chief Cabinet Secretary Yasuo Fukuda. "Japan humbly accepts that for a period in the not too distant past, it caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, particularly to those of Asian nations, through its colonial rule and aggression, and expresses its deep remorse and heartfelt apology for this. Such recognition has been succeeded by subsequent Cabinets and there is no change regarding this point in the present Cabinet" (Comments by the Chief Cabinet Secretary, Yasuo Fukuda on the history textbooks to be used in junior high schools from 2002. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site) Retrieved from [4].)
  • September 8, 2001. Minister for Foreign Affairs Makiko Tanaka. "We have never forgotten that Japan caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries during the last war. Many lost their precious lives and many were wounded. The war has left an incurable scar on many people, including former prisoners of war. Facing these facts of history in a spirit of humility, I reaffirm today our feelings of deep remorse and heartfelt apology expressed in the Prime Minister Murayama's statement of 1995" (Speech by Minister for Foreign Affairs Makiko Tanaka at the Ceremony in Commemoration of 50th anniversary of the Signing of the San Francisco Peace Treaty (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site) Retrieved from [5].)
  • October 8, 2001. (Chinese President Jiang Zemin met with visiting Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi on October 8, 2001) Koizumi thanked President Jiang for the meeting. He said that this was the first time he had visit China and the Lugou Bridge (Marco Polo Bridge) as well as the Memorial Hall of the War of Resistance against Japanese aggression. He had come to understand the miseries of war and offered “heartfelt apology and mourning" for the Chinese people who died in Japan's aggressive war half a century ago. Koizumi said, “I have seen for myself the brutal scenes of war exhibited in the Memorial Hall, and I come to know that the wound of war was immeasurable. Japan would learn from its deep introspection into history and would not let such a war reoccur”. He said, “in those days, Japan rejected the advice of international community, cling obstinately to its own course, which led to the consequence. Japan will learn from its history, take a peaceful road and continue to coordinate and cooperate with the international community”. Japan highly values the relations with China, which are vital for the basic interests of people in both countries and for the peace and stability of Asia and the world at large. Retrieved from [6].
  • October 15, 2001. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. "During the talks, President Kim highly appreciated the words of the Prime Minister Koizumi at Sodaemun Independence Park, in which he expressed remorse and apology for Japan's colonial domination" (Prime Minister Visits the Republic of Korea. (Official website of Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet), Retrieved from [7].)
  • 2001. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi (Also signed by all the prime ministers since 1995, including Ryutaro Hashimoto, Keizo Obuchi, Yoshiro Mori). "As Prime Minister of Japan, I thus extend anew my most sincere apologies and remorse to all the women who underwent immeasurable and painful experiences and suffered incurable physical and psychological wounds as comfort women. We must not evade the weight of the past, nor should we evade our responsibilities for the future. I believe that our country, painfully aware of its moral responsibilities, with feelings of apology and remorse, should face up squarely to its past history and accurately convey it to future generations" (Letter from Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi to the former comfort women. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site) Retrieved from [8].)
  • September 17, 2002. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. "The Japanese side regards, in a spirit of humility, the facts of history that Japan caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of Korea through its colonial rule in the past, and expressed deep remorse and heartfelt apology" (Japan-DPRK Pyongyang Declaration. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site) Retrieved from [9].)
  • August 15, 2003. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. "During the war, Japan caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, particularly to those of Asian nations. On behalf of the people of Japan, I hereby renew my feelings of profound remorse as I express my sincere mourning to the victims" (Address by Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi at the 58th Memorial Ceremony for the War Dead. (Official website of Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet) Retrieved from [10].)
  • April 22, 2005. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. "Japan squarely faces these facts of history in a spirit of humility. And with feelings of deep remorse and heartfelt apology always engraved in mind, Japan has resolutely maintained, consistently since the end of World War II, never turning into a military power but an economic power, its principle of resolving all matters by peaceful means, without recourse to use of force. Japan once again states its resolve to contribute to the peace and prosperity of the world in the future as well, prizing the relationship of trust it enjoys with the nations of the world." (Address by the Prime Minister of Japan at the Asia-African Summit 2005), Retrieved from [11].
  • August 15, 2005. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. "In the past, Japan, through its colonial rule and aggression, caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, particularly to those of Asian nations. Sincerely facing these facts of history, I once again express my feelings of deep remorse and heartfelt apology, and also express the feelings of mourning for all victims, both at home and abroad, in the war. I am determined not to allow the lessons of that horrible war to erode, and to contribute to the peace and prosperity of the world without ever again waging a war." Retrieved from [12].*
  • March 26, 2007. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, under fire for denying that Japan forced women to work as sex slaves during World War II, offered a fresh apology Monday but stopped short of clearly acknowledging Japan's responsibility for the front-line brothels. "I express my sympathy toward the comfort women and apologize for the situation they found themselves in," Abe told a parliamentary debate, using a euphemism used by Japanese politicians to refer to former sex slaves. "I apologize here and now as prime minister," he said. Retrieved from [13].

[edit] See also

[edit] External links


46 posted on 07/03/2007 10:17:39 AM PDT by snowsislander
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To: george76
The prototype A6M Zero fighter was carried from the Mitsubishi aircraft factory to an airfield in an ox cart (as were subsequent production fighters). It was not carried in a truck because aircraft tended to get damaged on the truck as it traveled the rough, unpaved road. It didn’t go on a train, ‘cause there wasn’t one between the airfield and the factory.

In American this is called a “clue.” As in, “a clue that your nation is not ready to go to war with the United States much less the entire Western World.” Yamamoto got it; the Japanese Imperial General Staff, apparently missed it somehow.

47 posted on 07/03/2007 10:20:33 AM PDT by Little Ray (Rudy Guiliani: If his wives can't trust him, why should we?)
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To: snowsislander

How many of these article specifically state that they are sorry for WWII. Look again at those articles. They refer to “history” and do not use the term WWII or what took place during WWII. They all have blinders on.


48 posted on 07/03/2007 10:21:07 AM PDT by taxesareforever (Never forget Matt Maupin)
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To: taxesareforever

Honestly, there have been apologies from Japanese officials (as documented
in post 46). Some are probably sincere, some are more qualified apologies.

And I wasn’t ragging on the average Japanese person about this duplicity...
Of course most of them weren’t even alive in WWII, but the collective
national amnesia on what proceeded Hiroshima/Nagasaki has been a
calculated bit of politics emanating from above; e.g., Japanese school
textbooks that gloss over Japan’s adventures in China/Manchuria,
Pearl Harbor and the Pacific.

I’ve worked and published with a fair number of Japanese; they are
without fail courteous and accomplished in their work.
BUT I never bring up anything even remotely connected with WWII because
it just would be a no-win discussion given the WWII victim mythology.


49 posted on 07/03/2007 10:27:29 AM PDT by VOA
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To: VOA

And we are in agreement here. It is my belief that the Japanese believe so much in personal honor that they cannot bring themselves to admit their mistakes in WWII because then they would bring shame on Japan. They then would be accountable for the bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and that they will not do.


50 posted on 07/03/2007 10:32:49 AM PDT by taxesareforever (Never forget Matt Maupin)
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