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Japan Official Resigns Over A-Bomb Quip
AP via ABC News ^ | Jul 3, 2007

Posted on 07/02/2007 9:48:33 PM PDT by james500

Japan's embattled defense minister resigned Tuesday over his comments suggesting the 1945 atomic bombings Hiroshima and Nagasaki were inevitable, news reports said. Fumio Kyuma had come under intense criticism from survivors of the bombing following the comments made over the weekend. He had apologized.

Broadcaster NHK and NTV carried news of the resignation.

(Excerpt) Read more at abcnews.go.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Japan; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: bataan; nanking; nogooddeed; pearlharbor; revolutionaryact; theyasked4it; theydeservedit; theygotit; tojo; truthteller
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To: james500
Japan's embattled defense minister resigned Tuesday over his comments
suggesting the 1945 atomic bombings Hiroshima and Nagasaki were
inevitable, news reports said.


Well, as one writer said "Man is an animal that can stand only
so much truth.".

Kudos to the poor fellow for having the courage to commit a
revolutionary act: telling the truth.
41 posted on 07/03/2007 9:38:39 AM PDT by VOA
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To: taxesareforever
Guess political correctness runs amuck in Japan also.

Constantly claiming "victim status" is the fig leaf many Japanese
wear so they can appear in public without blushing.

Or admitting to The Rape of Nanking or the death of Allied
soldiers and innocent Asians under the forced labor imposed by
the followers of The Emperor.

On the PBS episode of "Secrets of The Dead" on the Bridge Over
The River Kwai, a Japanese officer/engineer that ran the railway building
had photos of his wonderful wartime accomplishments.
He said that no Allied soldiers were used in building part of
the system he supervised...BUT, the photos he brought along clearly
showed US or Commonwealth POWs in the background of the photos.
42 posted on 07/03/2007 9:44:34 AM PDT by VOA
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To: VOA

I never thought of it that way and you are absolutely right. When was the last time I heard anyone from Japan apologize or say anything about being at fault in WWII? I take that back, when was the first time. I never have.


43 posted on 07/03/2007 10:07:15 AM PDT by taxesareforever (Never forget Matt Maupin)
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To: george76

I dunno offhand. :’) Yamamoto was considered the great mastermind behind Japanese naval successes, and was tracked and finally assassinated (his plane shot down). The Japanese spent years building one of the largest navies in the world (perhaps it was *the* largest?) then lost much of it in just a handful of large (but not quite large enough) engagements. The Midway defeat probably would not have happened had that ridiculous feint toward the Aleutians not taken place, even with the US having broken the Japanese codes. The US victory at Midway was a close-run thing, and regardless of fighting spirit, a bit more Japanese firepower could easily have made the difference. The Japanese people weren’t told the significance, details, and extent of the Midway defeat until the middle of the 1950s.


44 posted on 07/03/2007 10:13:49 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Time heals all wounds, particularly when they're not yours. Profile updated June 28, 2007.)
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To: taxesareforever

Cowardice?


45 posted on 07/03/2007 10:14:38 AM PDT by Old Professer (The critic writes with rapier pen, dips it twice, and writes again.)
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To: taxesareforever
I never thought of it that way and you are absolutely right. When was the last time I heard anyone from Japan apologize or say anything about being at fault in WWII? I take that back, when was the first time. I never have.

Here's a list of the last 35 years of apologies from the Japanese government, courtesy of the Wikipedia page "List of War Apology Statements Issued by Japan":


List of war apology statements issued by Japan

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Contents

[]

[edit] 1970s

[edit] 1980s

  • 24 August 1982. Prime Minister Zenko Suzuki. "I am painfully aware of Japan's responsibility for inflicting serious damages [on Asian nations] during the past war." "We need to recognize that there are criticisms that condemn [Japan's occupation] as invasion" (Press Conference on Textbook issue. qtd. in Tahara, Soichiro (田原総一朗). Nihon no Senso (日本の戦争). Shogakkan, 2000: Tokyo, Japan. p. 161.)
  • 26 August 1982. Chief Cabinet Secretary Kiichi Miyazawa. "1. The Japanese Government and the Japanese people are deeply aware of the fact that acts by our country in the past caused tremendous suffering and damage to the peoples of Asian countries, including the Republic of Korea (ROK) and China, and have followed the path of a pacifist state with remorse and determination that such acts must never be repeated. Japan has recognized, in the Japan-ROK Joint Communique, of 1965, that the 'past relations are regrettable, and Japan feels deep remorse,' and in the Japan-China Joint Communique, that Japan is 'keenly conscious of the responsibility for the serious damage that Japan caused in the past to the Chinese people through war and deeply reproaches itself.' These statements confirm Japan's remorse and determination which I stated above and this recognition has not changed at all to this day. 2. This spirit in the Japan-ROK Joint Communique, and the Japan-China Joint Communique, naturally should also be respected in Japan's school education and textbook authorization. Recently, however, the Republic of Korea, China, and others have been criticizing some descriptions in Japanese textbooks. From the perspective of building friendship and goodwill with neighboring countries, Japan will pay due attention to these criticisms and make corrections at the Government's responsibility. 3. To this end, in relation to future authorization of textbooks, the Government will revise the Guideline for Textbook Authorization after discussions in the Textbook Authorization and Research Council and give due consideration to the effect mentioned above. Regarding textbooks that have already been authorized, Government will take steps quickly to the same effect. As measures until then, the Minister of Education, Sports, Science and Culture will express his views and make sure that the idea mentioned in 2. Above is duly reflected in the places of education. 4. Japan intends to continue to make efforts to promote mutual understanding and develop friendly and cooperative relations with neighboring countries and to contribute to the peace and stability of Asia and, in turn, of the world" (Statement on History Textbooks. (Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Web Site), Retrieved from http://www.mofa.go.jp/policy/postwar/state8208.html ).
  • 7 September 1984. Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone. "There was a period in this century when Japan brought to bear great sufferings upon your country and its people. I would like to state here that the government and people of Japan feel a deep regret for this error" ( Economist, September 15, 1984).

[edit] 1990s

  • 18 April 1990. Minister of Foreign Affairs Taro Nakayama. "Japan is deeply sorry for the tragedy in which these (Korean) people were moved to Sakhalin not of their own free will but by the design of the Japanese government and had to remain there after the conclusion of the war" (188th National Diet Session Lower House Committee of Foreign Affairs. qtd. in Kenichi Takagi, Rethinking Japan's Postwar Compensation: Voices of Victims. tr. by Makiko Nakano. Retrieved from http://home.att.ne.jp/sun/RUR55/E/epage16.htm ).