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( Ted ) Turner's Land Holdings Keep Increasing
North Platte Bulletin ^ | July 16, 2007 | James E. Ducey

Posted on 07/17/2007 9:11:48 PM PDT by george76

The 100-year tenure of the McMurtrey Family at a pioneer ranch in Cherry County ended June 26 with a public referee auction at Valentine.

R.E. "Ted" Turner purchased the property by offering the highest bid. Turner bought the 26,332 deeded acres for nearly $10 million...

The opening bid was $290 per acre.

It was the largest ranch land auction ever held in Cherry County, according to Eric Scott, Cherry county attorney.

The auction was ordered by the Cherry County District Court.

Erba "Hub" McMurtrey built his ranch starting with Kinkaid homesteads with three McMurtrey Brothers in 1908. Ranch acreage increased with multiple buys from settlers and neighboring ranchers.

"My father was a pioneer of the country," said Mary Alice McMurtrey ...

Media mogul Ted Turner is the largest individual landowner in North America.

Turner, the founder of CNN, now owns more than 2 million acres and 16 ranches in seven states – Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota and Oklahoma.

Combined, the acreage Turner owns is an area bigger than Delaware.

(Excerpt) Read more at nebraska.statepaper.com ...


TOPICS: Extended News; Miscellaneous; US: Montana; US: Nebraska; US: New Mexico; US: Oklahoma; US: South Dakota
KEYWORDS: cnn; cnnfounder; tedturner; turner
Ted Turner is the largest individual landowner in North America.

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1 posted on 07/17/2007 9:11:48 PM PDT by george76
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To: Perdogg; jazusamo

2 posted on 07/17/2007 9:15:42 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: george76

Two million acres and 16 ranches and he doesn’t produce anything except socialist propaganda. What a man.


3 posted on 07/17/2007 9:15:58 PM PDT by LibWhacker
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To: LibWhacker

No matter what he does, in the back corner of his mind, he sees himself as uppity White Trash.


4 posted on 07/17/2007 9:19:56 PM PDT by Anti-Bubba182
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To: LibWhacker

He wants to institute the “Buffalo commons”. That’s why he’s buying up all the land.


5 posted on 07/17/2007 9:20:00 PM PDT by glorgau
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To: LibWhacker
After the working ranchers are forced off their land, Ted often builds a resort for Hollywood liberals to fly in.

He then makes money selling ‘sanctuary.’

6 posted on 07/17/2007 9:21:19 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: LibWhacker

He needs all that land to raise buffalo for his restaurants, preserve wildlife habitat, and...oh, yeah...”curb population growth”.

http://www.tedsmontanagrill.com/about_turner.html


7 posted on 07/17/2007 9:22:56 PM PDT by LibFreeOrDie (L'Chaim!)
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To: glorgau
"The McMurtrey Ranch was well taken care of by the owners and lessee," said Russ Miller, general manager of Turner Enterprises, Inc. "It has good flowing water."

Last I heard, the nutcase was buying water rights.

8 posted on 07/17/2007 9:29:04 PM PDT by Moonman62 (The issue of whether cheap labor makes America great should have been settled by the Civil War.)
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To: george76

“Turner is the largest individual landowner in North America.”

I guess that makes him King....

or in this country a capitalist.


9 posted on 07/17/2007 9:41:19 PM PDT by Natchez Hawk (You take that diaper off your head! You put that back on Senator Vitter!)
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To: Natchez Hawk

Did Ted ever pay the promised $ One Billion to the United Nations ?


10 posted on 07/17/2007 9:51:10 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: george76
Ted Turner is the largest individual landowner in North America.

If he figures out how to take it with him let me know. .

11 posted on 07/17/2007 9:53:30 PM PDT by org.whodat (What's the difference between a Democrat and a republican????)
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To: george76

“The checks in the mail”

c’mon man, you know how the post office is—we use to be cool—it’ll be there—count on it...what happened dude...you’ve changed.


12 posted on 07/17/2007 10:01:03 PM PDT by Natchez Hawk (You take that diaper off your head! You put that back on Senator Vitter!)
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To: george76

All that land and he’ll be dead soon. That’s gotta suck.


13 posted on 07/17/2007 10:16:46 PM PDT by snarks_when_bored
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To: george76

The choice of wording is interesting. The largest private landowner in the United States is International Paper. I wonder how many people are gainfully employed by Turner in the productive use of his land? Or does he just use it himself for hunting and fishing? Socialists always reveal their true colors whether they want to or not.


14 posted on 07/18/2007 6:34:38 AM PDT by kylaka
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To: kylaka

Apparently, Ted bought a ‘farm’ in Georgia that was also the local fishing stream.

First, he put up a fence and No Tresspassing signs. It was then closed.

The locals were not pleased.


15 posted on 07/18/2007 7:21:44 AM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: george76

Isn’t it just terrible when people who own private property get to do what they want with it?


16 posted on 07/18/2007 7:28:00 AM PDT by babble-on
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To: george76
The Vermejo Ranch that Turner bought from Pennzoil was known for its high quality-high price trout fishing. Rainbow and Brown were the introduced species there. Turner removed all of them and re-introduced the native cutthroat.

Vermejo was/is also known for elk hunting. Ted charges 22 grand for a guaranteed trophy bull.

17 posted on 07/18/2007 8:25:13 AM PDT by Ben Ficklin
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To: Ben Ficklin

Thanks.

Apparently, this was an old Spanish Land Grant were the locals had legal rights to cross this ranch to access trees to build and heat their homes, to hunt and fish to put food on their table, etc.

The public lands in the hills were recently deemed ‘wilderness’ , then the public access closed unless one paid Ted first.

http://www.vermejoparkranch.com/


18 posted on 07/18/2007 8:40:43 AM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: george76
Thanks for that link. Looking at the prices, that has got to be the most expensive fishing in the world. Ted needs the money.

That was the Maxwell Land Grant from the Mexican Governer. There was a lot of colorful history associated with it. The original Spanish grant to Cabeza de Vaca was in the same area.

19 posted on 07/19/2007 3:17:59 AM PDT by Ben Ficklin
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To: Ben Ficklin

We enjoy the history of this area. It is a back water now : compared to the Kit Carson, Santa Fe Trail, Bent Days...

The earlier Spanish and Pueblo histories are always interesting too.

Do you have any good history links or stories ?


20 posted on 07/19/2007 6:23:26 AM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: george76
At about the same time that Turner bought Vermejo, the Forest Service bought the Baca Ranch in North Central NM, which was a similar operation to Vermejo. At that time I did some web searching on both of those properties.

There is quite a bit on the Maxwell Grant to be found on the internet and much less on the Baca Grant. The Baca family lost their grant but the US Congress compensated them with the 5, 100,000 acre properties.

If you have an interest in the settlement of the west, there are 2 books that I would recommend.

The Great Plains by Walter Prescott Webb(1932) is still in print and still considered an authority on everything west of the 98th meridian. It gives good explanation as to why congress failed to disperse all the lands in the west. It also gives a lot of info on water rights, but since it was published in '32, it doesn't even mention the Ogalala aquifer or Federal Reserved water rights. These federal lands and federal water rights are, and will continue to be, a chronic problem. With Bush/GOP in the Whitehouse, the problems have subsided but a dem prez will put them back on the front burner.

Also, Great River by Paul Horgan('84) is the history of the Rio Grande.

21 posted on 07/20/2007 2:31:37 AM PDT by Ben Ficklin
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To: Ben Ficklin

Thank you.

I will look up these books.

It is too bad that Congress did not disperce more lands, at least to the state or local control.


22 posted on 07/20/2007 5:20:24 AM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: george76

1891 Congress passes the Forest Reserve Act, which authorizes setting aside public forests in any state or territory to preserve a timber supply for the future. The law marks the first step in a process that will steadily place more and more Western land in the hands of the federal government while leaving less and less available for private purchase and use.

As a result, federal priorities in the West gradually shift from selling public land to managing public resources, from land development to land conservation, and federal regulations become a permanent presence on the once wide open spaces.


23 posted on 07/20/2007 7:22:59 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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President Theodore Roosevelt secures passage of the Newlands Reclamation Act ...achieves outstanding success, leading ultimately to the colossal projects of the Depression years: Hoover Dam, the Grand Coulee Dam, Shasta Dam and the Glen Canyon Dam.

1905 President Theodore Roosevelt transfers management of the federal forest reserves to the United States Forest Service, an agency headed by college-trained conservationist Gifford Pinchot. Invoking scientific principles and applying bureaucratic procedures, Pinchot works effectively to guarantee the long-term usefulness of western timberlands

http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/events/1900_1917.htm


24 posted on 07/20/2007 7:28:01 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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The National Reclamation Act of 1902 authorized western irrigation projects paid for by the sale of land in 16 semiarid states. Under this law, Roosevelt initiated the construction of western dams, and the task of reclaiming the desert Southwest was started.

Roosevelt initiated similar conservation reforms in the West with his use of the National Reclamation Act (Newlands Act) of 1902. This law provided the federal government with responsibility and funding for dam construction and irrigation projects through the sale of public land in 16 semiarid states.

Roosevelt established a new federal agency, the Reclamation Service, to bring scientific expertise and bureaucratic administration to water in the West. By 1906, water projects were underway in all of the western states, which established federal control of this vital Western resource as well.

http://www.desertusa.com/mag98/july/papr/du_troosev.html


25 posted on 07/20/2007 7:42:39 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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1901
Congress passes what is known as the Right of Way Act, permitting the use of rights of way through forest reserves and national parks for electrical power, telephone and telegraph communication, and irrigation and water supply.

1911
Former President Roosevelt’s leadership in efforts to irrigate the West is recognized at the dedication of the Roosevelt Dam on the Salt River in Arizona; the contemporary importance of projects like the Roosevelt Dam is later documented in film footage of the dam and its impact.

1913
Debate over the fate of Hetch Hetchy continues in the national press throughout the year, along with intensive campaigning to save Hetch Hetchy


26 posted on 07/20/2007 7:50:35 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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( Ted ) Turner fights road paving

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1872774/posts


27 posted on 07/27/2007 8:13:39 PM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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