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Tour de France - Rest day 2 - July 24
Tour website ^ | 7/24/07 | Aeronaut

Posted on 07/24/2007 1:35:20 AM PDT by Aeronaut

Rest day today.


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: bicycle; bike; contador; doping; rasmussen; tdf; tour; tourdefrance; vinokourov
Stay tuned, This race ain't over!
1 posted on 07/24/2007 1:35:24 AM PDT by Aeronaut
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To: Aeronaut; whattajoke; CyberCowboy777; jern; concentric circles; Petronski; Voss; stylin_geek; ...

Tour de France ping!

Please FReepmail 'Aeronaut' if you want on or off the Tour de France 2007 list.

2 posted on 07/24/2007 1:35:54 AM PDT by Aeronaut (Hebrews 13:4)
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To: Aeronaut

“Versus” TV coverage:

Rest Day: Tuesday, July 24, 2007 - Foix to Loudenville - Le Louron
8:30am to 11:30am: Re-air of Stage 15 Coverage
12:00pm to 2:00pm: Re-air of Stage 15 Coverage
2:30pm to 4:30pm: Re-air of Stage 15 Coverage
5:00pm to 7:00pm: Re-air of Stage 15 Coverage
8:00pm to 10:30pm: Tour Recap Special
12:00am to 2:30am: Tour Recap Special


3 posted on 07/24/2007 1:37:11 AM PDT by Aeronaut (Hebrews 13:4)
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To: Aeronaut

Vino’s ride yesterday was one of the finest things I’ve ever seen in sport, plus Sherwin’s commentary about the howling crowd on the mountaintop proving the media’s claim that “cycling is dead”.


4 posted on 07/24/2007 2:34:53 AM PDT by laconic (ence)
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To: Aeronaut

Overall Individual Time

Stage 15:
Foix to Loudenvielle-Le Louron (196km)
Pos. No. Name Nat. Team Time Gap
1 058 RASMUSSEN, Michael DEN RAB 69:52:14.000 00:00:00.000
2 112 CONTADOR, Alberto ESP DSC 69:54:37.000 00:02:23.000
3 041 EVANS, Cadel AUS PRL 69:56:14.000 00:04:00.000
4 111 LEIPHEIMER, Levi USA DSC 69:57:39.000 00:05:25.000
5 196 KLÖDEN, Andréas GER AST 69:57:48.000 00:05:34.000
6 031 SASTRE, Carlos ESP CSC 69:59:00.000 00:06:46.000
7 071 ZUBELDIA, Haimar ESP EUS 69:59:41.000 00:07:27.000
8 195 KASHECHKIN, Andrey KAZ AST 70:00:08.000 00:07:54.000
9 027 KIRCHEN, Kim LUX TMO 70:00:38.000 00:08:24.000
10 073 ASTARLOZA, Mikel ESP EUS 70:01:35.000 00:09:21.000

5 posted on 07/24/2007 2:44:51 AM PDT by deport ( Cue Spooky Music...)
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To: Aeronaut

I admire these riders more than any atheletes in any other sport. Their training and conditioning is just unbelievable. I hope the “doping” thing goes away. It is too good a sport to be ruined as many other sports have been by drugs.


6 posted on 07/24/2007 4:15:41 AM PDT by SWEETSUNNYSOUTH (Help stamp out liberalism!)
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To: laconic
Vino’s ride yesterday was one of the finest things I’ve ever seen in sport, plus Sherwin’s commentary about the howling crowd on the mountaintop proving the media’s claim that “cycling is dead”.

That's sooo why I love the Tour. Like a novel, it can open each year with no real favorite & a cast of unknowns, but somewhere during the three grueling weeks as the narrative progresses on those mountains, at least a couple of these guys always manage to emerge from the peloton & capture our imagination by showing us some real heart & true spirit.

7 posted on 07/24/2007 4:47:48 AM PDT by leilani (!)
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To: Aeronaut

When are the allegations going to begin over Vino doing so poorly on Stage 14 and then coming back to win Stage 15 decisively ala Floyd Landis last year?


8 posted on 07/24/2007 5:24:38 AM PDT by Joy in the Journey (Forgiveness: easier to ask for and receive than permission.)
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To: Joy in the Journey

Exactly my thoughts. Vino did the same thing as Landis did last year.

After Landis’s test(s) (?) showed up positive there were all those people who claimed that it was impossible for a rider to recuperate so quickly without using some kind of doping. I don’t think the history of the Tour gives them right, but that’s what was said at the time.

So, now what?


9 posted on 07/24/2007 5:38:37 AM PDT by ScaniaBoy (Part of the Right Wing Research & Attack Machine)
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Comment #10 Removed by Moderator

To: laconic; All
He is so much fun to watch, and such a fighter. I'm a huge fan of his -- and his whole team is great this year. And, like you guys, I immediately thought of Floyd Landis.

His face is so tight and stern, you can't tell if he's emotional or not.

What's the rumor about a new American team? anybody know?

11 posted on 07/24/2007 7:57:43 AM PDT by lainie ("You would be amazed what the ordinary guy knows. " -- Matt Drudge)
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To: lainie; Baynative; Aeronaut; leilani; Ready4Freddy; ScaniaBoy; laconic; Joy in the Journey

You’re not gonna like this...

“The Tour de France was rocked by news that Astana’s battered team leader, Alexandre Vinokourov, tested positive for a homologous blood transfusion after Saturday’s time trial in Albi. L’Equipe reported on Tuesday afternoon that the Kazakh’s blood had shown evidence of a transfusion from another person with a compatible blood type in an analysis done in the Châtenay-Malabry laboratory...

Upon receiving the news, the Astana team suspended Vinokourov and quit the Tour de France...”

Link here:

http://www.cyclingnews.com/road/2007/tour07/news/?id=/news/2007/jul07/jul25news

It is dated for tomorrow, but I’ve seen that before in Cylcingnews.com.

This just bites.


12 posted on 07/24/2007 9:34:57 AM PDT by green iguana
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To: green iguana

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/other_sports/cycling/6914301.stm

and others news stories via Google

http://news.google.com/news?q=Vinokourov


13 posted on 07/24/2007 9:39:32 AM PDT by FewsOrange
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To: green iguana

That’s awful; just like Landis last year, same thing with the bad day then the recoupment the following day finishing far ahead of the field with amazing energy. I hopeits not true.


14 posted on 07/24/2007 9:49:50 AM PDT by laconic (ence)
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To: laconic

The thing is, that’s not all that uncommon in endurance sports like cycling. Bad days can have lots of causes and if the cause is addressed, a very good day can follow. I’ve seen it in my own cycling. Tho’ for a cyclist of my level of ‘ability’, one of my good days would be one of their very bad ones...

I hope it’s not true also. The test has only been around since 2004 - same one that got Tyler Hamilton suspended.


15 posted on 07/24/2007 10:04:07 AM PDT by green iguana
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To: green iguana

o.m.g.


16 posted on 07/24/2007 10:05:14 AM PDT by lainie ("You would be amazed what the ordinary guy knows. " -- Matt Drudge)
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Comment #17 Removed by Moderator

To: green iguana
I think we are seeing the Death Throes of the Tour de France and Cycling as we know it.

Vino failing a drug test on top of Yellow Jersey Rasmussen being banned from the OLympics next year are just piling on the problems.

I think it may be coming to a point where the ICU pulls the plug completely for a year or two, and tells all the teams to clean up and come back clean when we start competitions back up.

18 posted on 07/24/2007 10:06:17 AM PDT by commish (Freedom tastes sweetest to those who have fought to protect it.)
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To: commish

Team Astana just pulled out of the Tour a few minutes ago in reaction to the Vino news. I will give the Tour credit, however; THEY TAKE ACTION. Otherwsie, you have to “savor” Barry Bonds’ “breaking” Hank Aaron’s MLB record with apparently no input from the Commissioner; the NFL still trying to determine if Michael Vick should be suspended; and what can I say about the NBA?


19 posted on 07/24/2007 10:09:54 AM PDT by laconic (ence)
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To: commish

They might as well. How much more can the fans take?

It’s a joke.


20 posted on 07/24/2007 10:09:58 AM PDT by lainie ("You would be amazed what the ordinary guy knows. " -- Matt Drudge)
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To: lainie
I know. I have been mostly apathetic about this years Tour, but as the stages have ticked off and they have reached the mountains I started to pay more attention. Then Vino's ride was just awesome.

Now i feel just like I felt last year, like someone just took a dagger and shoved it in to the hilt.

I don't know if suspending competition for a year would make a difference for be the answer, but I do know this - I am done with cycling for the forseeable future.

I wish I had answers, but instead all I have is doubts and sadness.

21 posted on 07/24/2007 10:17:43 AM PDT by commish (Freedom tastes sweetest to those who have fought to protect it.)
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To: commish

You may be right - I don’t know how much more the sport can take. Tho’ I would also like to see a selection of much better labs doing the testing rather than Dick Pound’s lap puppy of Châtenay-Malabry.


22 posted on 07/24/2007 10:18:31 AM PDT by green iguana
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To: laconic

Blood doping?

The riders know they are going to be tested and they know what the testers are looking for.

Blood cells of another person with similar blood as Vino’s?

If he did it he was stupid, no, make that very stupid.

He’s asked for the B sample to be tested.

I think that, as well as cleaning up the riders, officials also should take a hard look at the testing company, handling and testing of the A & B samples and the people who work for the testing company.


23 posted on 07/24/2007 10:27:13 AM PDT by PeteB570 (Guns, what real men want for Christmas)
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To: green iguana

Forget all the drug testing. I’ve changed my opinion. I’m all for an “all drug” sport, where we don’t have to worry about this stuff anymore. If you can get it in your blood, more power to you.


24 posted on 07/24/2007 10:38:49 AM PDT by July 4th (A vacant lot cancelled out my vote for Bush.)
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To: green iguana
This just bites.

To the bone.

Speechless.

NOBODY is that dumb.

Are they?

25 posted on 07/24/2007 10:43:12 AM PDT by leilani (!)
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To: July 4th
I’m all for an “all drug” sport, where we don’t have to worry about this stuff anymore. If you can get it in your blood, more power to you.

Either that or I'm switching allegiance to a sport where drugs can't help. Except I don't know what that might be....hopscotch, maybe?

26 posted on 07/24/2007 10:52:37 AM PDT by leilani (!)
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To: green iguana; Baynative; Aeronaut; leilani; Ready4Freddy; ScaniaBoy; laconic; Joy in the Journey
Tour de France leader embarrasses Tour de France
Tuesday 24 July 2007 05:01

One could hardly blame Tour de France director Christian Prudhomme if he were rooting for race leader Michael Rasmussen of Denmark to have a very bad day in Wednesday's stage in the Pyrenees Mountains.

In his race leader's yellow jersey, the 33-year-old Dane is far too visible to be ignored, and his visibility inevitably inspires thoughts of cheating and doping, the devils that have plagued the world's most prestigious cycling event for several years.

Not that Rasmussen has ever been found to have used a banned substance. It is simply that he was kicked off the Danish national cycling team for having missed two doping tests before the Tour started.

Tour organizers suggested that the Dane would not have been allowed to start the Tour if the Danish Cycling Federation had notified them before the Tour started.

"If we had been informed before the start, there wouldn't be this situation," said Patrice Clerc, the head of the Amaury Sport Organization (ASO), which runs the race.

"This situation" is simply that a man strongly suspected of cheating is now the favourite to win the Tour title. If that happens, it would make this year's edition the 12th consecutive Tour de France with a tainted champion.

The 1996 winner, fellow Dane Bjarne Riis, has admitted doping to win the race. The following year's winner, Jan Ullrich of Germany, has been linked to a Spanish blood doping scandal and was kicked off last year's race. Italian Marco Pantani, who won the 1998 Tour, was eventually caught doping and died of a cocaine overdose.

Lance Armstrong, who won seven consecutive Tour titles between 1999 and 2005, has been accused of doping by several people and a number of books - although he has never been found to have doped. And last year's winner, Floyd Landis, tested positive for synthetic testosterone during a Tour stage and is currently fighting to keep the title.

If Rasmussen raises his arms in triumph on July 29 on the Champs Elysees in Paris, at the Tour's end, it could turn be a very costly victory for the Tour.

In addition to his missing two doping tests (because of an "administrative error," he said), Rasmussen has been accused, by an American mountain bike rider named Whitney Richards, of trying to dupe him into transporting a human blood substitute to Europe in 2002. Rasmussen said he could not "confirm" the statement, which was made on the Internet site Velo-News.

The controversy followed the revelation that German rider Patrik Sinkewitz had tested positive for an illegally high level of testosterone before the Tour started.

http://www.jurnalo.com/jurnalo/storyPage.do?story_id=49776

27 posted on 07/24/2007 10:54:44 AM PDT by lainie ("You would be amazed what the ordinary guy knows. " -- Matt Drudge)
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To: commish

meant to ping you to #27 also.

Seems like the thing’s imploding. As others have said, the stupidity is staggering. The whole entire thing has been an utter waste of our time...other than entertainment value, I suppose. It’s like watching Paris and Lindsay and Britney and Nicole. Who’s taking drugs now, and getting caught? Oh, Vinokourov. pfft.


28 posted on 07/24/2007 11:00:17 AM PDT by lainie ("You would be amazed what the ordinary guy knows. " -- Matt Drudge)
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To: lainie

The thing is when they get caught, they only get a two year suspension. The dopers should just be thrown out of the sport entirely & banned for life.


29 posted on 07/24/2007 11:04:40 AM PDT by leilani (!)
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To: PeteB570
Borat is bummed!


30 posted on 07/24/2007 12:46:16 PM PDT by drew
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To: green iguana; lainie; Baynative; Aeronaut; leilani; Ready4Freddy; ScaniaBoy; laconic; ...
Terrible news. Just came home and heard it on the radio. Hopeless.

However, note the difference between this case and Landis - this time it is blood doping, something that certainly can enhance endurance. Note also that it occurred on the time trial stage. Then he had a very bad day, followed by an excellent day. Now as a stage winner I would assume he would automatically be tested. It will therefore be very interesting to see if he showed up positive also on yesterday’s stage. If not, well.....I am worried about the standard of both the testing institutes and some of the tests.

The amount of background work to find out if certain substances have a large diurnal rhythm, show up more or less after extreme exercise and fatigue, the effect of altitude exposure, etc, etc is tremendous. I know that in a lot of blood screening tests carried out in a clinical setting this work has never really been carried out to the full extent needed. That said, I do not know anything about this particular blood test.

Anyway, my idea to save the Tour is to ban all injections, venous infusions etc. Any rider who needs venous infusion during the race is sick and should be taken out of the race for health reasons. This will cause the race time to go up because the riders would really need to husband their reserves, but the race would not lose its excitement. To make sure - or at least reduce the chances of tampering with the riders - during the race they should all eat in and sleep in big halls - with the teams mixed.

I’m sure this would appear very primitive to most of the riders, but it could actually enhance the status of the race.

Of course it would not reduce the risk of doping during the preparation for the Tour nor would it be impossible to hinder someone taking drugs orally.

Sad day, really sad day.

31 posted on 07/24/2007 1:40:57 PM PDT by ScaniaBoy (Part of the Right Wing Research & Attack Machine)
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To: leilani
"NOBODY is that dumb."

That's what I said after Landis. But then there were Riis and Basso and Zabel and Vino and ongoing suspicions of Valverde and Rasmussen. So maybe "everybody does it" is basically true and that's why they are all so "stupid" and proclaim their innocence - they think, since everybody does it, it's not really cheating.

The shame is that - doping or not - these are tremendous athletes who push their bodies to extremes unimaginable in other sports, and this gets forgotten.
32 posted on 07/24/2007 2:16:53 PM PDT by Steve_Seattle ("Above all, shake your bum at Burton.")
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To: ScaniaBoy
That said, I do not know anything about this particular blood test.

Neither do I. From the IHT:

First revealing the news about Vinokourov on Tuesday, a rest day in the race, a French sports newspaper, l'Equipe, said on its Web site that the analysis of his blood was conducted by the Chatenay-Malabry laboratory outside of Paris.

It said that two distinctive types of red blood cells were found in the A, or first, test of his blood and showed that Vinokourov received a transfusion from a compatible donor shortly before the time trial in Albi.

Fresh blood augments the number of red corpuscles, which carry oxygen to depleted muscles.

Blood taken from a rider and then returned to his body cannot be detected but blood from a donor can be - a new test first caught Tyler Hamilton, the American winner of the Olympic time trial in Athens in 2004, when it was administered in Spain weeks after his triumph.

Bags of blood for transfusion back into the donor rider are at the heart of the Operación Puerto scandal in Madrid, which has implicated some of bicycle racing's stars."

[Vino's team manager Marc Biver "denies having manipulated his blood," The Associated Press reported from Pau & Biver added that the rider believed that "blood anomalies in his body" might have resulted from a crash he was involved in last week.]

If he were going to cheat this way, why wouldn't he have just brought some of his own blood for that purpose? Crazy!

33 posted on 07/24/2007 2:42:01 PM PDT by leilani (!)
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To: Steve_Seattle
The shame is that - doping or not - these are tremendous athletes who push their bodies to extremes unimaginable in other sports, and this gets forgotten.

It's tragic. And surely not everybody on the tour is doing it now. But those that aren't must be kicking themselves because they might just as well have been doping these past two weeks - nobody will ever believe that they didn't now.

34 posted on 07/24/2007 2:49:36 PM PDT by leilani (!)
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To: leilani
It's hard to believe that Vino could have been acting without the knowledge of team management. These blood transfusions are highly complex and require a great deal of planning - it isn't something you do on the spur of the moment, or while you're hiding in the men's room. So team Astana might be in deep doo doo.

But the whole sport is in deep doo doo. The fact that high-profile cheating is still being attempted - and detected - in the wake of the massive negative publicity of the Landis fiasco tells potential sponsors to stay away. This is very bad news for Discovery, looking for new sponsorship.
35 posted on 07/24/2007 3:27:16 PM PDT by Steve_Seattle ("Above all, shake your bum at Burton.")
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To: Steve_Seattle

What you say - is absolutely an utterly right -

everyone a bit involved into the sport knew, that latest since the days of Indurain a medical team is behind every athlet in the tour and what they did was treating inflamations with corticoids treating short breath with budesonid - treating restricted blood flow with aspirine - all these syptoms you get - you know if you cicyle up a mountain at tour speed. They didn’t look at it as doping - it was treatment and the efford to keep the athlet in shape.

And then came medicine against low levels of erythrocytes against to less muscle tissue against low spirit and depression.

All symptoms of fatigue could be seen as medical issue and you have to look at the sport scientifically to win don’t you ?

Even in indurains times there were doping rules but the testing organisations where far underfunded to follow the guys through their training camps on fuerte ventura for 1 month, in argentinia for another, then south africa etc..

... they are still today.

Indu even had a nose surgeon to widen the diameter of his breathing tracts - since mouth breathing shows your opponents you’re under stress and nose breathing moistens the air wich is more bening for the lung.

They where certainly all in it - noone in the business thought it was wrong.

They wake up today. Perhaps.


36 posted on 07/25/2007 2:09:47 AM PDT by Rummenigge (there's people willing to blow out the light because it casts a shadow)
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To: lainie

Lol - this now has a different meaning doesn’t it ?


37 posted on 07/25/2007 2:11:48 AM PDT by Rummenigge (there's people willing to blow out the light because it casts a shadow)
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To: Rummenigge

Everything I said has a COMPLETELY new meaning now.

:-(

GRRR!


38 posted on 07/25/2007 11:51:14 AM PDT by lainie ("You would be amazed what the ordinary guy knows. " -- Matt Drudge)
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To: ScaniaBoy
This will cause the race time to go up because the riders would really need to husband their reserves, but the race would not lose its excitement.

If all riders were proportionally slower, I don't think the race would lose any of its excitement. Maybe the super long rides are too much for any undoped human and should be shortened.

39 posted on 07/31/2007 3:43:16 PM PDT by Freee-dame
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