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This day in History 1945: Atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima
History.com ^ | August 6, 2007 | Staff

Posted on 08/06/2007 3:11:20 AM PDT by abb

The United States becomes the first and only nation to use atomic weaponry during wartime when it drops an atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Though the dropping of the atomic bomb on Japan marked the end of World War II, many historians argue that it also ignited the Cold War.

Since 1940, the United States had been working on developing an atomic weapon, after having been warned by Albert Einstein that Nazi Germany was already conducting research into nuclear weapons. By the time the United States conducted the first successful test (an atomic bomb was exploded in the desert in New Mexico in July 1945), Germany had already been defeated. The war against Japan in the Pacific, however, continued to rage. President Harry S. Truman, warned by some of his advisers that any attempt to invade Japan would result in horrific American casualties, ordered that the new weapon be used to bring the war to a speedy end. On August 6, 1945, the American bomber Enola Gay dropped a five-ton bomb over the Japanese city of Hiroshima. A blast equivalent to the power of 15,000 tons of TNT reduced four square miles of the city to ruins and immediately killed 80,000 people. Tens of thousands more died in the following weeks from wounds and radiation poisoning. Three days later, another bomb was dropped on the city of Nagasaki, killing nearly 40,000 more people. A few days later, Japan announced its surrender.

In the years since the two atomic bombs were dropped on Japan, a number of historians have suggested that the weapons had a two-pronged objective. First, of course, was to bring the war with Japan to a speedy end and spare American lives. It has been suggested that the second objective was to demonstrate the new weapon of mass destruction to the Soviet Union. By August 1945, relations between the Soviet Union and the United States had deteriorated badly. The Potsdam Conference between U.S. President Harry S. Truman, Russian leader Joseph Stalin, and Winston Churchill (before being replaced by Clement Attlee) ended just four days before the bombing of Hiroshima. The meeting was marked by recriminations and suspicion between the Americans and Soviets. Russian armies were occupying most of Eastern Europe. Truman and many of his advisers hoped that the U.S. atomic monopoly might offer diplomatic leverage with the Soviets. In this fashion, the dropping of the atomic bomb on Japan can be seen as the first shot of the Cold War. If U.S. officials truly believed that they could use their atomic monopoly for diplomatic advantage, they had little time to put their plan into action. By 1949, the Soviets had developed their own atomic bomb and the nuclear arms race began.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: hiroshima; history; nuclear; wwii
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The results speak for themselves. The two atom bombs ended WWII. End of argument.
1 posted on 08/06/2007 3:11:23 AM PDT by abb
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To: abb

Let the MSM hand wringing begin.


2 posted on 08/06/2007 3:15:15 AM PDT by mainepatsfan
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To: abb

“many historians argue that it also ignited the Cold War.”

So the US started the Cold War????? I thought there were two sides in the Cold War? Are they sure they can’t blame George Bush?


3 posted on 08/06/2007 3:16:14 AM PDT by caver (Yes, I did crawl out of a hole in the ground.)
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To: mainepatsfan

What you said...

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-et-weektv6aug06,1,5486625.story?coll=la-headlines-business

On HBO, the stories of WWII atomic-bomb survivors
August 6, 2007

It’s hard to imagine HBO’s disturbing documentary on survivors of the two atomic bombs dropped on Japan appearing on an American TV network 10 or 20 years after the event. Filmmaker Steve Okazaki tried — and failed — to make it for the 50th anniversary.

There is apparently enough emotional scar tissue built up to allow HBO’s premiere of “White Light/Black Rain: The Destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki” at 7:30 tonight, exactly 62 years after the United States detonated the first-ever nuclear bomb over Hiroshima. The second, and so far last, atomic bomb was dropped three days later. It ended World War II.

Why is the time finally right?

snip


4 posted on 08/06/2007 3:17:30 AM PDT by abb (The Dinosaur Media: A One-Way Medium in a Two-Way World)
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To: abb

the msm will most likely keep reporting about the bad bad US dropping the bomb...

they rarely if ever report about the japanese death marches and always report but step over the sneak attack of the japanese...

by the end of the day....some how jorge bush will also be at fault!!!!


5 posted on 08/06/2007 3:24:03 AM PDT by nyyankeefan
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Bravo Zulu gentlemen. Job well done.

6 posted on 08/06/2007 3:24:31 AM PDT by A.A. Cunningham
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To: abb

7 posted on 08/06/2007 3:25:31 AM PDT by RaceBannon (Innocent until proven guilty; The Pendleton 8: We are not going down without a fight)
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To: mainepatsfan
Let the MSM hand wringing begin.

Weenies. The dropping of the bombs on Japan was an unalloyed good.

8 posted on 08/06/2007 3:25:37 AM PDT by gridlock (Quack ... (thump) Quack ... (thump) Quack ... (thump) Quack ... (thump)......)
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To: abb

The “first shot in the Cold War” was heard in November, 1944 when Communist junior officers and CPOs in the Greek Fleet (then at Alexandria) mutinied and had to be violently suppressed by Royal Marines. Then the reds tried to take over Athens, requiring Churchill to divert a corps’ worth of troops from the Italian front to quash them. Not all the shooting in Europe in 1944-45 was directed at the Axis, nor did the Cold War wait until VJ-Day to get hot.


9 posted on 08/06/2007 3:27:57 AM PDT by Snickersnee (Where are we going? And what's with this handbasket?)
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To: A.A. Cunningham

http://www.decaturdaily.com/decaturdaily/news/070806/pilot.shtml

Decatur resident recalls friendship with Enola Gay pilot

By Ronnie Thomas
rthomas@decaturdaily.com · 340-2438

Nancy Jones recalls meeting Paul Tibbets at the Museum of Flight in Seattle, Wash., where she lives and works for Boeing.

“He gave a speech and had a book signing,” Jones said. “I asked him to sign a book for my brother-in-law, E.C. Hall. He looked up and said, ‘Where in hell is Easy?’ ”

Jones is visiting Hall and his wife, Joy, at their apartment at Riverside Assisted Living. A visitor steered the conversation to a discussion about Tibbets, who, on this date 62 years ago, piloted his B-29, the Enola Gay, over Hiroshima, Japan, and dropped the first atomic bomb, helping to end World War II.

“He would remember me as Easy,” Hall said. “I got the nickname in junior high school in Wichita Falls, Texas, and I remained a captain so long in the Air Force, they called me ‘Captain Easy.’ ”

Hall became a friend with the legendary flier during the mid-1950s at old Hunter Air Force Base in Savannah, Ga.

Serving under Tibbets

“He was my boss, commander of the 308th Bomb Wing,” Hall said. “I was flying a C-97 at the time. I was a co-pilot for a couple of years then made aircraft commander, the youngest at the time. I was at Hunter five years, and Joy and I married there.”

Hall said Tibbets apparently “took a liking to me” after he and his crew took him on a flight.

“From then on, whenever he needed to go someplace, he would call for me,” Hall said. “I felt good about that because as wing commander, he had a choice. There were many flights, but I remember one trip in particular when we flew him to Omaha, Neb., to meet with Gen. Curtis LeMay.”

LeMay was known as the father of Strategic Air Command and was vice presidential running mate of independent candidate and former Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace in 1968.

Hall said when the command rotated to North Africa in the late 1950s, Tibbets made a special request.

“By that time, he had divorced and married his current wife, Andrea, a French woman,” Hall said. “They’ve now been together more than 50 years. Anyway, their young son was with his dad near Casablanca, and Paul asked me to fly him home to Hunter. The boy at the time spoke only French, and I didn’t recall much from my college class. It was interesting, but we made it. We came home in a military air transport C-54.”

Training pilots

Later, Tibbets gave Hall a choice of a T-33 air training command or flying KC-135’s with Strategic Air Command.

“I was ready to get out of SAC, and I chose to train pilots at the old base in Greenville, Miss.,” he said. “Paul left Hunter for MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Fla., and to stay in touch, I’d fly down there for visits. At the time, I was a lowly captain and he was now a brigadier general. We’d sit underneath a grapefruit tree and talk about everything. He’d pick my brain about younger pilots, and I’d tell him what I thought.”

He said he last saw Tibbets years ago in Atlanta at the annual National Business Aircraft Association show, when Tibbets was president of Columbus, Ohio-based Executive Jet Aviation, a global all jet air taxi company, and Hall worked for Air Research, headquartered in Los Angeles.

Living in Columbus

Tibbets retired from the company in 1987 and lives in Columbus. He is 92.

Hall, who retired from the Air Force Reserve as a lieutenant colonel, said he remembers Tibbets for not only being an American aviation hero but for being a gentleman as well.

“He was a great man, and it is an honor for me to know him,” Hall said.

He recalls that Tibbets did not drink or smoke and was an excellent ham operator until he lost his hearing.

“I e-mailed him a few minutes ago,” Hall said, “and wished him the best from Joy and me.”


10 posted on 08/06/2007 3:28:18 AM PDT by abb (The Dinosaur Media: A One-Way Medium in a Two-Way World)
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To: caver

So I guess those same historians think an invasion of Japan would have led to peaceful coexistence with the Soviets???!!


11 posted on 08/06/2007 3:30:08 AM PDT by mainepatsfan
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To: gridlock

If we’d had it just a year earlier think of the millions of lives that would have been saved.


12 posted on 08/06/2007 3:32:23 AM PDT by mainepatsfan
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To: abb

It was just what the doctor ordered...


13 posted on 08/06/2007 3:33:33 AM PDT by johnny7 ("But that one on the far left... he had crazy eyes")
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To: abb
By 1949, the Soviets had developed their own atomic bomb

Yeah, right. And the Rosenburgs were just a sweet innocent couple from New York...

14 posted on 08/06/2007 3:40:35 AM PDT by Yossarian (Everyday, somewhere on the globe, somebody is pushing the frontier of stupidity...)
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To: Yossarian

I’m sure the Rosenburgs were democrats.


15 posted on 08/06/2007 3:47:20 AM PDT by jhroberts
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To: abb
The United States becomes the first and only nation to use atomic weaponry during wartime,,,,

,,,and Japan surrendered.

16 posted on 08/06/2007 3:47:43 AM PDT by TYVets (God so loved the world he didn't send a committee)
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To: abb

As I tell all the liberal wusses that cry about Hiroshima, there are penalties for backing guys that shove people into boxcars to be shipped off and burned in ovens.


17 posted on 08/06/2007 3:52:33 AM PDT by domenad (In all things, in all ways, at all times, let honor guide me.)
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To: abb
I agree with you and I hate leftists who try to rewrite History. Every time we have an anniversary for these dates I get a warm and fuzzy feeling... because I know that millions of Americans would have never been born if their fathers had died taking the Japanese home islands!

Screw pc and screw the dims!

LLS

18 posted on 08/06/2007 3:54:58 AM PDT by LibLieSlayer (Support America, Kill terrorists, Destroy dims!)
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To: caver

“So the US started the Cold War?????”

General George Patton disagreed... and no leftist POS liberal dim Historian is going to be able to rewrite that bit.

BTW, someone ask the author how he feels about Russia starting up Cold War II. pooty started this one all by his lonesome!

LLS


19 posted on 08/06/2007 3:57:33 AM PDT by LibLieSlayer (Support America, Kill terrorists, Destroy dims!)
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To: mainepatsfan

“So I guess those same historians think an invasion of Japan would have led to peaceful coexistence with the Soviets???!!”

Hah! I hadn’t thought of it that way. If we had invaded and lost a million men, then we would have been good buddies with the Soviets!


20 posted on 08/06/2007 4:30:48 AM PDT by caver (Yes, I did crawl out of a hole in the ground.)
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To: caver

Not to mention the fact there very well could have been a North and South Japan.


21 posted on 08/06/2007 4:31:36 AM PDT by mainepatsfan
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To: LibLieSlayer

“BTW, someone ask the author how he feels about Russia starting up Cold War II. pooty started this one all by his lonesome!”

There’s a number of Soviet cheerleaders on FR lately. They’ll be along shortly trying to rewrite the Commies history.


22 posted on 08/06/2007 4:32:30 AM PDT by caver (Yes, I did crawl out of a hole in the ground.)
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To: mainepatsfan

A very likely possibility.


23 posted on 08/06/2007 4:33:27 AM PDT by caver (Yes, I did crawl out of a hole in the ground.)
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To: RaceBannon

Red Dawn over Mecca


24 posted on 08/06/2007 4:33:39 AM PDT by COBOL2Java (The Democrat Party: radical Islam's last hope)
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To: abb

And to think some people actually flip out over Tancredo’s ‘nuke Mecca’ policy.

I have no problem with that.


25 posted on 08/06/2007 4:35:18 AM PDT by ovrtaxt (Sworn to oppose control freaks, foreign and domestic.)
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To: caver

Yep... lots of enemies hang here these days.

LLS


26 posted on 08/06/2007 4:36:18 AM PDT by LibLieSlayer (Support America, Kill terrorists, Destroy dims!)
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To: Snickersnee

The U.S. lost almost 100,000 KIA in WW-III, it wasn’t cold.


27 posted on 08/06/2007 5:00:09 AM PDT by ASA Vet (http://www.rinorepublic.com)
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To: LibLieSlayer

One of those might have been my dad. He had mostly recovered from a crash landing in India (he was a pilot in the CBI Campaign) but was notified in ‘45 that because of a pilot shortage, the AAF would need his services again for the invasion. Fortunately, he wasn’t needed for a second tour.


28 posted on 08/06/2007 5:49:38 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (BTUs are my Beat.)
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To: caver
Are they sure they can’t blame George Bush?

Wait a few hours...as we speak, the MSM is ironing out the last few details of their version of the Time-Warp Continuum theory which shows conclusively that GW is responsible for WWII.

29 posted on 08/06/2007 5:53:28 AM PDT by econjack
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To: mainepatsfan

Yep, stand by for our annual rite of self-flagellation. Every year it happens, without fail. I’m so weary of it.


30 posted on 08/06/2007 6:00:54 AM PDT by chimera
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To: LibLieSlayer
I’m probably one. My Dad was in Germany awaiting orders for the Pacific campaign when they dropped the bomb. He’d survived D-Day and the campaigns in Northern France and into Germany, and was probably headed over for the invasion of Japan. Instead, he came home to marry the girl he loved, raise his family, and live a good and decent life. Dropping those bombs saved many an American family. In wartime, you look out for your own and don’t worry as much about your enemy.
31 posted on 08/06/2007 6:06:25 AM PDT by chimera
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To: abb
"exactly 62 years after the United States detonated the first-ever nuclear bomb over Hiroshima"

Those guys at the Trinity test site would surely have been surprised by this statementm ;)
32 posted on 08/06/2007 6:14:40 AM PDT by SJSAMPLE
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

GOD bless him!

LLS


33 posted on 08/06/2007 6:26:19 AM PDT by LibLieSlayer (Support America, Kill terrorists, Destroy dims!)
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To: chimera

GOD bless your Dad!

LLS


34 posted on 08/06/2007 6:27:49 AM PDT by LibLieSlayer (Support America, Kill terrorists, Destroy dims!)
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To: nyyankeefan
they rarely if ever report about the japanese death marches and always report but step over the sneak attack of the japanese...

Believe it or not, I watched a great documentary on the "final months" of the war in the Pacific last night, on PBS of all places.

The Japanese had a chance to surrender after we fire-bombed Tokyo in May of 1945. They did not (they refused to even consider it.)

The Japanese planned to use the Battle for Okinawa, in the summer of 1945, as a bargaining chip to perhaps achieve a conditional surrender--one in which they could maintain their imperial government. Despite a three-month battle in which Japan finally lost, they did not surrender.

Japan knew at that point, an invasion of their mainland was imminent, but did everything they could to hold their ground. Perhaps a half million or more American forces were projected to lose their lives in such an invasion, and probably far more Japanese.

To their credit, Japan fought an honorable war, but they refused to surrender prior to the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Japan had ample reasons to surrender prior to August, 1945, but nothing compelled the, as did the atomic bombs.

35 posted on 08/06/2007 6:36:42 AM PDT by Lou L
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To: abb
The explosive detonated at White Sands, NM in July was an implosive device similar to the one dropped on Nagasaki. Called the 'Gadget', it was mounted on top of a tower for the detonation. My grand-uncle remembers seeing like a 'sunrise' in the south that morning. He lived in Taos at the time, about 400 miles away.
The Little Boy, as it was known, was a 'gun' type of device, that the scientists were pretty confident would work as it did. The problem with the gun type is to increase yield meant increasing size.
The implosive device would limit the need to make a larger and larger device that might not have been feasible to carry by air.
36 posted on 08/06/2007 6:38:16 AM PDT by Pistolshot (Every woman, who can, should learn to shoot, and carry a gun.)
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To: All
For more information on experiments.

Nuclear Weapon Archive.

37 posted on 08/06/2007 6:40:10 AM PDT by Pistolshot (Every woman, who can, should learn to shoot, and carry a gun.)
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To: abb
The Japanese should consider the alternative. We could have kept building and dropping atomic bombs for months (the Carhtaginian solution). Instead, we let them surrender and then we rebuilt Japan into a modern, civilized, economically strong society. The nuclear medicine the Greatest Generation applied was good for Japan. It would be good for any country run by a death cult "religion". We would be justified in applying this cure to any country using suicide bombers to murder thousands of American troops.

Fly the flag today. Set off fireworks tonight.
38 posted on 08/06/2007 6:43:11 AM PDT by Ragnar54
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To: Lou L
To their credit, Japan fought an honorable war, ...

I think there are any number of veterans of the Pacific campaign who might dispute that.

39 posted on 08/06/2007 7:01:43 AM PDT by Brujo (Quod volunt, credunt.)
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To: abb
The results speak for themselves. The two atom bombs ended WWII. End of argument.

And saved even more Japanese lives than American lives.

40 posted on 08/06/2007 7:02:22 AM PDT by dfwgator (The University of Florida - Still Championship U)
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To: domenad
As I tell all the liberal wusses that cry about Hiroshima, there are penalties for backing guys that shove people into boxcars to be shipped off and burned in ovens.

The Japs did plenty of atrocities on their own.

41 posted on 08/06/2007 7:03:25 AM PDT by dfwgator (The University of Florida - Still Championship U)
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To: Yossarian

(chuckle)


42 posted on 08/06/2007 7:04:16 AM PDT by Badeye (You know its a kook site when they ban the word 'kook')
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To: Lou L
To their credit, Japan fought an honorable war...


43 posted on 08/06/2007 7:05:37 AM PDT by dfwgator (The University of Florida - Still Championship U)
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To: econjack

Are they sure they can’t blame George Bush?
Wait a few hours...as we speak, the MSM is ironing out the last few details of their version of the Time-Warp Continuum theory which shows conclusively that GW is responsible for WWII.

No, the leftwingnuts will begin ranting about Prescott Bush again....(eyes rolling)


44 posted on 08/06/2007 7:05:38 AM PDT by Badeye (You know its a kook site when they ban the word 'kook')
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To: Brujo

To their credit, Japan fought an honorable war, ...
I think there are any number of veterans of the Pacific campaign who might dispute that.

Not to mention 250,000 plus that were exterminated in Nanking.....


45 posted on 08/06/2007 7:06:50 AM PDT by Badeye (You know its a kook site when they ban the word 'kook')
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To: Brujo
I think there are any number of veterans of the Pacific campaign who might dispute that.

While some of their tactics may have been considered brutal by individuals, I think when viewed through the lense of history, the sacrifices their soldiers, and country made would be considered honorable. Had they won, their campaigns would be seen as bold and courageous. To the victor goes the spoils...

46 posted on 08/06/2007 7:07:21 AM PDT by Lou L
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To: abb

An invasion of mainland Japan would have resulted in millions of casualties on both sides, particularly among the Japanese civilian population. The revisionists also seem to forget that a single fire bombing raid on Tokyo a few weeks before the Hiroshima bomb killed an estimated 100,000 people... considerably more than the total initial deaths at Hiroshima.


47 posted on 08/06/2007 7:30:38 AM PDT by The Great RJ ("Mir we bleiwen wat mir sin" or "We want to remain what we are." ..Luxembourg motto)
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To: Lou L
“While some of their tactics may have been considered brutal by individuals ...”

That has to be the understatement of the day, and its only 10:30 am EST. Although the Nuremberg trials get the most attention, there were also the Tokyo war-crimes trials which resulted in seven defendants being executed in December 1948.

48 posted on 08/06/2007 7:34:34 AM PDT by riverdawg
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To: Lou L
“While some of their tactics may have been considered brutal by individuals ...”

That has to be the understatement of the day, and its only 10:30 am EST. Although the Nuremberg trials get the most attention, there were also the Tokyo war-crimes trials which resulted in seven defendants being executed in December 1948.

49 posted on 08/06/2007 7:38:44 AM PDT by riverdawg
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To: caver
“many historians argue that it also ignited the Cold War.”

Without the U.S. possession of atomic weapons, the Russians would have quickly rolled over Europe, tossing the western "allies" into the sea. So to the extent that atomic weapons prevented an immediate Soviet take over in Europe, yes, the Cold War was the result of U.S. possession of atomic weapons. (The Russians had many more troops on the ground and much, much shorter supply lines. It would not have been a contest.)

50 posted on 08/06/2007 7:43:18 AM PDT by Lonesome in Massachussets (Bestowing kindness on the evil visits cruelty on the good.)
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