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Judge tosses out evolution lawsuit
The Sacramento Bee ^ | September 13, 2007 | Laurel Rosenhall

Posted on 09/13/2007 6:02:12 AM PDT by DaveLoneRanger

A federal judge has thrown out a lawsuit against the Roseville Joint Union High School District that was filed by a Granite Bay man unhappy with how evolution was being taught in his children's school.

The father, Larry Caldwell, spent much of 2003 and 2004 trying to persuade the Roseville high school district to alter its biology curriculum to include arguments against evolution. After many meetings and discussions about his proposals, the school board rejected them.

Caldwell then sued the district, four administrators and two school board members, alleging they had violated his constitutional rights in the process of considering his proposals. School district officials denied Caldwell access to certain meetings and discriminated against him for being Christian, Caldwell claimed.

(Excerpt) Read more at sacbee.com ...


TOPICS: Extended News; Philosophy; US: California
KEYWORDS: crevo; crevolist; evolution; junklawsuits; lawsuitabuse; tortreform
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To: From many - one.

We just lost the concept of “decendant populations” ~ it’s a “group thing” now ~ and includes those bugs living in your armpits!


21 posted on 09/13/2007 6:54:37 AM PDT by muawiyah
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im amused as to why so many folks get their dander up when a person wants to have both sides of an issue dicussed in schools for their children.

literature classes discuss shakespeare, did he or didnt he write his own work.

economics courses, or history discuss the pros and cons of decisions made by world leaders past and present...

but, when folks, who are not trying to push religious views and merely want to point out the faults of evolutionism, all the sudden, they are criticized and censored without any fair hearing of their side....


22 posted on 09/13/2007 7:01:33 AM PDT by raygunfan
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To: muawiyah
“We just lost the concept of “decendant populations” ~ it’s a “group thing” now ~ and includes those bugs living in your armpits!”

Sorry about the creative pre-caffeine spelling of “descendant” ... one day I’ll try waking up before posting.

This is not quite as new as it looks, but still pretty high on the nifty scale. Keep in mind that mitochondria and chloroplasts include genomes swallowed whole.

23 posted on 09/13/2007 7:05:33 AM PDT by From many - one.
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To: From many - one.
"The concept of the change of allele frequency in descendant populations says nothing about how the alleles got there."

Yeah and I'm a weatherman because I predict that the weather is going to change.

24 posted on 09/13/2007 7:23:13 AM PDT by GourmetDan (You! Out of the Gene Pool!)
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To: stormer
"So you are saying, “If evolution did predict this, then evolution is scientific.” I have to agree with you there."

Evolution didn't predict this, therefore it isn't scientific.

"And “after the fact story telling” certainly describes religion, but I don’t know what it has to do with science."

Nothing, and that's what you were doing when you said, "In fact, the process of phagocytosis and the consequent sharing of genetic material is quite consistent with evolutionary theory and (you won’t like this) may have a great deal to do with simple bacteria in the primordial ooze sprouting legs, moving onto land, and inventing god."

25 posted on 09/13/2007 7:26:55 AM PDT by GourmetDan (You! Out of the Gene Pool!)
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To: DaveLoneRanger
“...trying to persuade the Roseville high school district to alter its biology curriculum to include arguments against evolution.”

I think since evolution is a theory, arguments against it should be heard.

Otherwise it seems that evolution is being sold like a product (let the buyer beware), rather than a legitimate theory being taught to fresh young minds at an academic institution, in a land of freedom.

26 posted on 09/13/2007 7:38:08 AM PDT by Berlin_Freeper (ETERNAL SHAME on the Treasonous and Immoral Democrats!)
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To: muawiyah

I would suggest that that is a new path to mutation, rather than “mutation is not needed”.

For what it is worth, the mitochondrions are essentially a separate organism inside us, giving us the ability to perform aerobic respiration, (see Kreb’s Cycle).

Further research in the influence of parasites on hosts would be profitable. I think of parasites as an organism which has a virtual body, once implanted.

Imagine that. The human body is “Second Life” to its parasites.


27 posted on 09/13/2007 7:38:23 AM PDT by donmeaker (You may not be interested in War but War is interested in you.)
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To: DaveLoneRanger

“. . . Kent Hovind tactics . . . “


We have just seen a DVD on which Kent Hovind is teaching how to get creation science information into libraries, schools, and so forth. Well, there wan’t one mention of filing law suits. The “tactics” he presented are very good, for those interested and want to order his series.


28 posted on 09/13/2007 7:43:03 AM PDT by John Leland 1789
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To: donmeaker
If you can acquire genes wholesale why would you ruin perfectly good genes by mutating them?

No, this is NOT mutation ~

29 posted on 09/13/2007 7:44:34 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Bringbackthedraft
“Bring in creationism into a Public School is like bringing in a religious belief.”

Bringing evolution into a public school is like bringing in a religious belief, and it is a done deal.

Bringing Humanism into the a public school is bringing in a religious belief, but the Humanist Manifestos I & II are the religion of the government school apparatus nation wide.

30 posted on 09/13/2007 7:47:03 AM PDT by John Leland 1789
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To: muawiyah

Chromosones mutate. Genes are the result. a collection of bases is either is a gene, or it is not. There is a lot of junk on a chromosone that has no purpose that we can discern. Waiting for a mutation to turn into a butterfly...


31 posted on 09/13/2007 7:47:33 AM PDT by donmeaker (You may not be interested in War but War is interested in you.)
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To: donmeaker
Again, refer to Science News. Bunch of stuff in a new article about "junk genes". There's much more structure there than you can imagine ~ genes are, as it turns out, huge ~ huge I tell you, and SERIOUS!

Here's a thought for you ~ just because something can be mutated doesn't mean it needs to be mutated, particularly if you can just pick up a perfectly good, but more adequate version, elsewhere.

32 posted on 09/13/2007 7:51:47 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Berlin_Freeper
I think since evolution is a theory, arguments against it should be heard.

Absolutely. I couldn't agree more. But since evolution is a scientific theory, those arguments against it must be rooted in science.

Any contradictory evidence must be discussed, just as soon as any is found. Any competing scientific theories must get equal time, just as soon as any are developed.

Students should also be reminded (or, more likely, told) that "scientific theory" does not mean "guess," it means "model extrapolated from and supported by evidence." Students are never too young to learn that words mean things.

33 posted on 09/13/2007 7:52:44 AM PDT by highball ("I never should have switched from scotch to martinis." -- the last words of Humphrey Bogart)
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To: donmeaker

Or, the other way around ~ ever think of that one?


34 posted on 09/13/2007 7:53:14 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: muawiyah

Absolutely. genes need to be big so that they can assemble functional T-RNA via z-DNA. Further, they can be diffuse, spread out with sub-assemblies or precursors put together off the main strand.

The synthesis of hemoglobin shows that, as do the various genetic diseases grouped under the heading of porphria.


35 posted on 09/13/2007 7:55:24 AM PDT by donmeaker (You may not be interested in War but War is interested in you.)
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To: muawiyah

The other way around is called “children” in suburbia.


36 posted on 09/13/2007 7:56:53 AM PDT by donmeaker (You may not be interested in War but War is interested in you.)
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To: Bringbackthedraft
If you let in one religious belief you will have to let in the others too.

Seriously false assertion, one made by leftists continually.
No, we don't have to let "all others in too". Our country and our culture are based on the Judaeo-Christian belief system, and 84% of the people claim to be Christians. There is nothing wrong with teaching the values of the American culture and the belief system on which it is based.

37 posted on 09/13/2007 7:57:41 AM PDT by MrB (You can't reason people out of a position that they didn't use reason to get into in the first place)
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To: donmeaker

“Porphyria” I believe ~ 86 different varieties ~ definitely some instability in that code.


38 posted on 09/13/2007 7:58:11 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: John Leland 1789

Kent Hovind is generally a sensationalist kind of guy, and it’s cost him in the long run. He’s also currently serving a prison sentence for tax fraud.


39 posted on 09/13/2007 7:59:37 AM PDT by DaveLoneRanger ("Being normal is not necessarily a virtue. It rather denotes a lack of courage.")
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To: donmeaker

BTW, genes are so huge they can obviously accommodate all the machinery needed to do all sorts of stuff. They must necessarily possess more than one type of super computer ~ including, no doubt, several devoted to quantum processing techniques, or maybe even processing in dimensions we don’t even know aobut yet.


40 posted on 09/13/2007 8:01:31 AM PDT by muawiyah
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