Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Paey given full pardon; Crist orders him freed today
St. Petersburg Times ^ | September 20, 2007 | unknown

Posted on 09/20/2007 3:27:17 PM PDT by secretagent

TALLAHASSEE -- Richard Paey is a chronic pain patient in year three of a 25-year mandatory-minimum sentence for trafficking in drugs -- his own pain medication.

But his freedom is just hours away.

Gov. Charlie Crist and the Florida Cabinet voted unanimously to grant Paey a full pardon Thursday morning for his 2004 conviction on drug trafficking and possession charges.

"We aim to right a wrong and exercise compassion and to do it with grace," the governor said. "Congratulations ... and I state he should be released today."

With that, Paey's wife Linda, their three children, a family friend and attorney John Flannery II hugged and cried at the podium, the entire cabinet meeting room erupting into applause at 9:40 a.m.

It was a stunning turn in the long saga of Paey, a 48-year-old Hudson man who suffers debilitating pain from a 1985 car wreck, botched back surgery and multiple sclerosis that has left him needing the use of a wheelchair in prison.

He was first arrested in 1997 and convicted on the third try in 2004 of possessing, trafficking and illegally obtaining the medication he needs for the searing, fiery pain in his back and legs.

His supporters still contest every bit of the state's case and today, they finally found sympathetic ears eager to help. His medical condition is real, they told the cabinet, evidenced by the amoung of painkillers the Department of Corrections itself now gives to Richard Paey every day.

(Excerpt) Read more at sptimes.com ...


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: drugs; paey; pardon; prison; richardpaey; wodlist
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-53 next last
Yea!
1 posted on 09/20/2007 3:27:22 PM PDT by secretagent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: JTN

FYI


2 posted on 09/20/2007 3:28:03 PM PDT by secretagent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Recovering Ex-hippie

Maybe we got a decent governor?!


3 posted on 09/20/2007 3:29:27 PM PDT by Chieftain (RIP Texas Cowboy and Cheif Negotiator, we miss you.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: secretagent

Wow, government does the right thing for once.


4 posted on 09/20/2007 3:29:38 PM PDT by darkangel82 (Socialism is NOT an American value.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: darkangel82

I’m awfully sorry it took two years.


5 posted on 09/20/2007 3:30:55 PM PDT by Marie2 (I used to be disgusted. . .now I try to be amused.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: secretagent

excellent, there are so many more deserving of prison in FL.


6 posted on 09/20/2007 3:31:20 PM PDT by Battle Hymn of the Republic
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Chieftain

You mean you are having second thoughts about “one square”? I need more data, much more than the Miami Herald thinks he is a good governor.


7 posted on 09/20/2007 3:31:41 PM PDT by Tarpon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Marie2

He never should have even been charged.


8 posted on 09/20/2007 3:31:57 PM PDT by darkangel82 (Socialism is NOT an American value.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: darkangel82
Wow, government does the right thing for once.

Correcting a grievous error is not the same as doing the right thing. He still did over two years for no crime at all.

Now putting the judge and prosecutor in jail would be doing the right thing.

9 posted on 09/20/2007 3:34:03 PM PDT by magslinger (Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors. And miss. R.A.Heinlein)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: magslinger

I agree, although that won’t happen.


10 posted on 09/20/2007 3:34:41 PM PDT by darkangel82 (Socialism is NOT an American value.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: secretagent

Sounds like common sense ruled the day.

What were the drugs he was “trafficking” in?


11 posted on 09/20/2007 3:38:08 PM PDT by ovrtaxt (Sworn to oppose control freaks, foreign and domestic.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ovrtaxt

Ocycodone and hydrocodone, I think.


12 posted on 09/20/2007 3:47:08 PM PDT by secretagent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: darkangel82

The government had some push from a committed crew of “Friends of Paey”.


13 posted on 09/20/2007 3:49:45 PM PDT by secretagent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: ovrtaxt

“What were the drugs he was “trafficking” in?”

I’m pretty sure this is the guy who had a prescription for these drugs. The jury was not allowed to be told that the drugs were legal with a prescription.


14 posted on 09/20/2007 3:53:25 PM PDT by driftdiver
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: penowa

Flowida is such a dangewous pwace to wive.... /sniveling


15 posted on 09/20/2007 3:56:09 PM PDT by Eagle Eye (If you agree with Democrats you agree with America's enemies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: secretagent

I was telling someone in line about this case a few months ago. I said if Crist wants my respect, he should pardon this guy. The guy was one of those that was clueless about politics and the news.

I am really, really glad to hear this.


16 posted on 09/20/2007 3:56:53 PM PDT by I still care ("Remember... for it is the doom of men that they forget" - Merlin, from Excalibur)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: magslinger

Check to see who was attorney general in Florida in 2004.


17 posted on 09/20/2007 3:57:12 PM PDT by Eagle Eye (If you agree with Democrats you agree with America's enemies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: secretagent

Now if only they’d discipline the over-zealous idiots who prosecuted him in the first place.


18 posted on 09/20/2007 3:59:08 PM PDT by mgstarr ("Some of us drink because we're not poets." Arthur (1981))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: I still care
I am really, really glad to hear this.

Good news from the WOD front.

19 posted on 09/20/2007 4:03:48 PM PDT by secretagent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: mgstarr
Now if only they’d discipline the over-zealous idiots who prosecuted him in the first place.

I think they needed three trials to get him.

20 posted on 09/20/2007 4:06:17 PM PDT by secretagent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: ovrtaxt

His own. You are only allowed to have a certain amount of pain med. He had more.

If you have over 40? pills more than your current prescription, they try you in FL as a trafficker. And it’s a minimum of 20 years. I think that’s it.


21 posted on 09/20/2007 4:06:47 PM PDT by I still care ("Remember... for it is the doom of men that they forget" - Merlin, from Excalibur)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: driftdiver
I’m pretty sure this is the guy who had a prescription for these drugs. The jury was not allowed to be told that the drugs were legal with a prescription.

I don't know about that.

His doctor said he forged prescriptions, and Paey says his doctor lied to protect his license from the capricious laws on "over-prescription".

The prosecution says Paey had blank prescription forms.

22 posted on 09/20/2007 4:11:16 PM PDT by secretagent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: secretagent

“The prosecution says Paey had blank prescription forms.”

Perhaps, those kind of drugs are extremely addictive and doctors usually don’t care until you are hooked. This kinda guy gets 25 years and child rapers get out in 12. Something wrong with that.


23 posted on 09/20/2007 4:21:48 PM PDT by driftdiver
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: secretagent

Now they need to jail that tyrannical prosecutor for unlawful prosecution, like Nifong.

Ed


24 posted on 09/20/2007 4:23:45 PM PDT by Sir_Ed
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: driftdiver
This kinda guy gets 25 years and child rapers get out in 12. Something wrong with that.

Yes, even most supporters of the WOD would agree, hence the pardon.

25 posted on 09/20/2007 4:37:52 PM PDT by secretagent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Eagle Eye; magslinger
"Check to see who was attorney general in Florida in 2004."

You mean Crist reversed his own handiwork?

26 posted on 09/20/2007 4:39:13 PM PDT by Waryone (Constantly amazed by society's downhill slide.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: driftdiver
I’m pretty sure this is the guy who had a prescription for these drugs. The jury was not allowed to be told that the drugs were legal with a prescription.

Actually I think you are talking about this guy:

After 2 years in prison, a man is free - maybe

In the Paey case they also did some fairly questionable entrapment type stuff, threatened the doctors and other bad stuff, but did not get the judge to prevent the jury from knowing O'Hara did have a prescription for the drug he was caught with. The O'Hara prosecutor is such an idiot he is trying him again.
27 posted on 09/20/2007 4:40:16 PM PDT by microgood
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Sir_Ed

I didn’t follow the Duke case much - didn’t Nifong break the law by withholding evidence favorable to the defense?


28 posted on 09/20/2007 4:41:45 PM PDT by secretagent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: secretagent

“Yes, even most supporters of the WOD would agree, hence the pardon.”

Crist is an idiot who plays to the lowest common denominator. Lets not forget he also supports restoring voting rights for criminals upon their release.


29 posted on 09/20/2007 4:43:29 PM PDT by driftdiver
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: driftdiver

If a criminal pays his fines, restitution, and serves his sentence then he has paid his debt to society, has he not?

At that point why shouldn’t he have his rights restored?

Or do you advocate making a person pay his debt forever?


30 posted on 09/20/2007 4:52:57 PM PDT by Eagle Eye (If you agree with Democrats you agree with America's enemies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: magslinger
Correcting a grievous error is not the same as doing the right thing. He still did over two years for no crime at all.

He was convicted of forging prescriptions, and he had 700 percocet tablets in his possession. I wouldn't call that "no crime at all." This guy wasn't, by any evidence presented, hoarding pills for recreational use, or passing them on to others, but he was participating in the illegal trade in controlled substances.

25 years was, of course, an absurd sentence, and when it took seven years and three trials to get a conviction, someone should have taken the hint and pleaded it out to a fine and probation. The kind of common sense, justice tempered with mercy that the governor and cabinet applied should have been should have been applied at the DA level.

But the War on (some) Drugs has brought up a whole generation of prosecutors, and for that matter legislators, who think it's ore important to be tough than smart. This is the natural outcome of a system that leans on mandatory minimums and three-strike laws, in the lunatic belief that if you can just make the laws tough enough, judges and juries will no longer have to use their brains or exercise judgment.

31 posted on 09/20/2007 4:59:30 PM PDT by ReignOfError
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Waryone

Sumpun like dat.


32 posted on 09/20/2007 5:07:09 PM PDT by Eagle Eye (If you agree with Democrats you agree with America's enemies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Eagle Eye
If a criminal pays his fines, restitution, and serves his sentence then he has paid his debt to society, has he not?

At that point why shouldn’t he have his rights restored?

IF he has completed his sentence (including parole), and can convince the relevant officials that you're now a solid citizen and no longer a threat -- it shouldn't be automatic. And I would make it a one-shot deal -- if you petition to have your rights restored, and then are convicted of another felony, that's it. You already burned your second chance.

My dad's been in corrections for almost 40 years, and the dirty little secret is that rehabilitation does work -- obviously not for everyone, and obviously not every time, but a good program can cut the number of released felons who land back in prison from two in three to one in three. And that's not some airy-fairly liberal notion -- ask Mike Huckabee and Chuck Colson.

It's really not all that difficult to tell who's reformed and who hasn't, even though criminals are manipulative and lie as naturally as they breathe. When in doubt, reject the proposal and ask the felon to come back after a couple more clean years.

And there are, at least in some states, multiple steps to restore different rights -- for example, it's less dangerous (at least arguably) to allow a felon to vote or serve as an officer of a publicly-traded company than to own guns. I believe Georgi has one process for restoration of other rights, and a separate one for gun rights.

The bottom line is that it takes human judgment to make the determination -- and human judgment has never been more unfashionable in the criminal "justice" system than it is today. It's obvious to all of us that a flasher is not the same as a stalker, and a 20-year-old who has a back-seat rendezvous with a 17-year-old girlfriend is less dangerous than a pedophile. But they're side-by-side on the sex offender registry, because our half-assed Solons love lists and metrics and guidelines they can use to try to take all compassion, judgment and common sense out of the system.

Gee, can you tell this is a pet cause of mine?

33 posted on 09/20/2007 5:31:00 PM PDT by ReignOfError
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: ReignOfError

If he has completed his sentence, including parole, then he shouldn’t have to persuade any one of anything. He has completed his sentence, he’s done.

If he still has steps to complete then he hasn’t paid his debt to society, has he?

Rehab won’t work if society keeps its boot on the ex con’s neck, now will it?

If he can’t be trusted with the vote or with a gun then perhaps he shouldn’t be out of prison, should he?


34 posted on 09/20/2007 5:42:53 PM PDT by Eagle Eye (If you agree with Democrats you agree with America's enemies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: Eagle Eye
"Check to see who was attorney general in Florida in 2004"

Bob Butterworth, democrat

He gave his ex-wife a gun after he divorced her. She then shot and killed their 16 year old son and herself on a Miami street.

35 posted on 09/20/2007 6:01:28 PM PDT by moonman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: moonman

Crist.

http://myfloridalegal.com/NewsBrie.nsf/OnlineBriefs/1FE990D38ACA342685256E190060EDBB


36 posted on 09/20/2007 6:09:09 PM PDT by Eagle Eye (If you agree with Democrats you agree with America's enemies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: secretagent; traviskicks

Thank you for the ping, secretagent. This is wonderful news. This story was always very heartbreaking, and it’s great to see that the right thing was finally done.

traviskicks, this is a story that the ping list has followed in the past. I think they would be interested.


37 posted on 09/20/2007 6:45:14 PM PDT by JTN (If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Eagle Eye
If he has completed his sentence, including parole, then he shouldn’t have to persuade any one of anything. He has completed his sentence, he’s done.

I don't think it's unreasonable to treat a convicted felon differently from other citizens. Most felons reoffend. The notion of treating ex-folons as permanently less trustworthy goes back to common law, and even biblical law. We stopped branding and amputating.

If he still has steps to complete then he hasn’t paid his debt to society, has he?

It's not a one-step process. The Constitution establishes that no one can be deprived of life, liberty or property without due process of law. Convicted felons have been deprived of liberty and property (not life, presumably because those folks are pretty quiet) under due process of law.

There is a reasonable presumption that a felon isn't a nice guy. He has surrendered his rights via due process. And if he wants to rejoin society as a full citizen, he has to make the case for a second chance.

If he still has steps to complete then he hasn’t paid his debt to society, has he?

If I borrow ten grand from you, and I bankrupt out of it, that vacates my debt. I can't make you loan me another ten grand. And if you do so, you're likely an idiot.

Rehab won’t work if society keeps its boot on the ex con’s neck, now will it?

Society won't work if society accepts ex-cons back with open arms. Most lie. Most are bad people. That is why we put them in prison. When they cross the prison threshold, they don't become our bestest buddies.

Rehab won’t work if society keeps its boot on the ex con’s neck, now will it?

Rehab won't work if you let the criminals off easy, either. We want to make felons better. We don't want to play patty-cake.

38 posted on 09/20/2007 6:57:37 PM PDT by ReignOfError
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Eagle Eye
"He was first arrested in 1997 ..."

Butterworth was Attorney General at that time.

39 posted on 09/20/2007 7:06:01 PM PDT by moonman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: Eagle Eye
"Flowida is such a dangewous pwace to wive.... /sniveling"

FL is a VERY dangerous place to live if you're old and/or disabled, if you have some $ and no nearby relatives. The legal profession has a scam going with the courts to make a living by ripping off defenseless people, becoming their appointed guardians, fleecing the marks after placing them in hospices and custodial homes, charging it all to the federal taxpayers, after making their assets vanish. Vanish = doling out the assets to everybody involved in the scam.

Interesting that you think it's swell that this guy was pardoned by some sleazy politician by groveling, begging and perhaps paying off someone for his freedom, yet you maintain he did nothing wrong to end up behind bars. Oh yeah, it's a great place to live if you don't mind being a serf.

40 posted on 09/20/2007 7:16:44 PM PDT by penowa
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: JTN

glad to see the news, bookmark for tommorrow ping


41 posted on 09/20/2007 8:24:42 PM PDT by traviskicks (http://www.neoperspectives.com/Ron_Paul_2008.htm)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: moonman

You are correct. My bad.


42 posted on 09/21/2007 4:59:33 AM PDT by Eagle Eye (If you agree with Democrats you agree with America's enemies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: moonman
I don't think it's unreasonable to treat a convicted felon differently from other citizens. Most felons reoffend. The notion of treating ex-folons as permanently less trustworthy goes back to common law, and even biblical law. We stopped branding and amputating.

Remember that "felon" describes a wide range of people from the embezzler to the murderer, from a 19 year old with a underage girlfriend to someone in possession of a bald eagle feather.

Admittedly most felons didn't get convicted on their first offence, let alone their first arrest or even their first trial.

Now the only felons I'm talking about are those who have fulfilled their court sentence, restitution, fines, incarceration. Not parolees or those on probation.

Those that are done.

And I'm not talking about requiring employers or bankers giving these guys equal consideration with the rest of the population.

I'm talking about freed men and women.

Why should they not be able to vote again? How can they be expected to become part of society again if they cannot vote? What value is there to society in preventing them from voting?

And why should they not have the right to bear arms in self defence? I really don't care what the offense was. If he is determined to use a gun criminally again, laws won't stop it. The law only stops his non criminal right to bear arms in self defence.

Those that are still on parole or probation don't qualify for this so they aren't even part of the eqation. They haven't yet proven anything.

Those that have fulfilled their sentence have.

43 posted on 09/21/2007 5:13:31 AM PDT by Eagle Eye (If you agree with Democrats you agree with America's enemies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: secretagent

And what justice for the corrupt prosecutors who did this?


44 posted on 09/21/2007 7:11:52 AM PDT by stinkerpot65 (Global warming is a Marxist lie.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: JTN; Abram; akatel; albertp; AlexandriaDuke; Alexander Rubin; Allerious; Allosaurs_r_us; amchugh; ..
Libertarian ping! To be added or removed from my ping list freepmail me or post a message here.
45 posted on 09/21/2007 8:40:24 AM PDT by traviskicks (http://www.neoperspectives.com/Ron_Paul_2008.htm)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: microgood

Rush Limbaugh was being investigated for a while, so I’ll bet they had to be tough on every-body to give cover for the crap they were pulling with Rush!


46 posted on 09/21/2007 8:45:24 AM PDT by mdmathis6
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: stinkerpot65

I know of no corruption with the prosecutors, if you mean breaking any laws.

I do think the whole WOD corrupts the law that prosecutors apply.

What justice for all of us who acquiesce in the WOD?


47 posted on 09/21/2007 8:53:04 AM PDT by secretagent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: secretagent

About Time ...

Good news


48 posted on 09/21/2007 9:58:13 AM PDT by SubGeniusX ($29.95 Guarantees Your Salvation!!! Or TRIPLE Your Money Back!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ReignOfError
“...the dirty little secret is that rehabilitation does work — obviously not for everyone, and obviously not every time, but a good program can cut the number of released felons who land back in prison from two in three to one in three.”

If that were true than we’d see every state adopting these magical programs to cut recidivism. Your dad sounds a lot like the guys who run my state’s community correction centers. I’ve been working in the criminal justice system a lot of years and have visited some of these facilities and talked to a lot of the people that run them. I’ve even heard one say “the dirty little secret is that rehabilitation does work,” as he was giving his spiel about how great community correction centers are. Recidivism rates are lower from these facilities. They do focus on rehabilitation rather than punishment, which I think is a good thing. They try to stop some of the things like the prison drug trade and prison rape and these are noble efforts. Prison I think in many cases makes people worse than they were when they went in. But, they take far too much credit for their lower recidivism rates. They think it’s because of their “moral recognition therapy” classes or whatever it is they teach, but the fact of the matter is that the biggest factor in why they have lower recidivism rates is that they start with inmates that are less likely to continue in their life of crime. These are only relatively short term commitments. They don’t let in violent offenders, sex offenders, or people convicted of the more serious crimes. They even look at people’s past misdemeanor records to determine eligibility. Those convicted of more serious crimes, like those that carry a potential punishment of life in prison, can’t get in. That knocks out all the people who get convicted of selling tiny amounts of meth or any other Schedule I or Schedule II drugs. Not only that but if people screw up bad enough while they are in one of these facilities they’ll get transferred to a regular prison to finish out there time and not be factored in when the recidivism rate for community correction centers is calculated. Also, prosecutors usually aren’t going to offer community corrections sentences to career criminals who have been in a lot of trouble. Quite often these are young first offenders, far from being hardened criminals. It should be no surprise at all that they are less likely to recidivate than people coming out of regular prisons. It has little to do with the fancy programs. If you can come up with a fancy program that will “cut the number of released felons who land back in prison from two in three to one in three,” and actually do that well with all those convicted rather than just a select few, please let us all know about that program so that we can reduce crime and slash our prison expenses.

49 posted on 09/21/2007 11:15:03 AM PDT by TKDietz
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: Eagle Eye
I agree with everything you said except for the part where you said, “Admittedly most felons didn’t get convicted on their first offence, let alone their first arrest or even their first trial.” What makes you think that? Most people who get arrested get convicted. Almost all of them will end up pleading guilty or no contest. Few of the few who go to trial walk away with a not guilty verdict.
50 posted on 09/21/2007 11:31:47 AM PDT by TKDietz
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-53 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson