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NASA's Dawn Spacecraft Begins Trek to Asteroid Belt
Space.com ^ | 27 September 2007 | Tariq Malik

Posted on 09/27/2007 1:10:44 PM PDT by saganite

A NASA probe blasted into space early Thursday, kicking off an unprecedented mission to explore the two largest asteroids in the solar system.

Riding atop a Delta 2 rocket, NASA's Dawn spacecraft launched toward the asteroids Vesta and Ceres at 7:34 a.m. EDT (1134 GMT) from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla.

"In my view, we're going to be visiting some of the last unexplored worlds in the solar system," said Marc Rayman, Dawn director of system engineering at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif.

Dawn's eight-year mission will carry the 2,685-pound (1,212-kilogram) probe across three billion miles (4.9 billion kilometers) on NASA's first sortie deep into the asteroid belt, a ring of space rocks that circles the Sun between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

By visiting the bright, rocky asteroid Vesta and the large, icy Ceres, researchers hope Dawn will shed new light on the formation of planets and solar system's early evolution.

Aside from a wayward ship, which delayed today's launch by 14 minutes when it encroached into the Atlantis Ocean splashdown zone for segments of Dawn's rocket, the liftoff went as planned, NASA launch director Omar Baez said.

Long journey ahead

Dawn is expected to rendezvous and orbit the 330-mile (530-kilometer) wide Vesta between August 2011 and May 2012, then move on to Texas-sized Ceres by February 2015. With its spherical shape and 585-mile (942-kilometer) diameter, Ceres is so large it is also considered a dwarf planet.

"It will be the first mission to journey to, and orbit around, two celestial bodies, and the first to visit a dwarf planet," said Dawn program manager Jim Adams, at NASA's Washington, D.C. headquarters, of the asteroid-bound flight.

Dawn carries an optical camera, gamma ray and neutron detector and a mapping spectrometer to study Vesta and Ceres. Some of those tools will get a trial run during a planned Mars flyby in 2009, researchers said.

To power those instruments, the spacecraft is also equipped with the most powerful solar arrays ever launched into deep space.

With a wingspan of nearly 65 feet (almost 20 meters), or about the distance from the pitcher's mound to home plate on a baseball field, the arrays will generate more than 10 kilowatts near Earth, though that output will decrease as the spacecraft moves further from the Sun.

NASA officials set Dawn's mission cost at $357.5 million excluding the cost of its Delta 2 rocket, according to a September update. In a July briefing, Dawn researchers said the asteroid-bound flight could cost a total of $449 million and incur an extra $25 million in overhead due to launch delays.

Attempts to launch the mission in July were thwarted first by poor weather and rocket glitches, then by difficulties arranging ship and aircraft tracking equipment in time for liftoff. NASA also canceled the mission outright in March 2006, only to reinstate the expedition a few weeks later.

"It has been quite an emotional rollercoaster," Chris Russell, Dawn's principal investigator at the University of California, Los Angeles, said of the mission. "And part of the emotional rollercoaster is the gratitude that we have for all of the people that defended Dawn in those times."

An asteroid trek on ion power

Built by Virginia-based Orbital Sciences, the Dawn spacecraft has been touted as the Prius of space probes because of the uncanny fuel efficiency of its three-engine ion drive.

Dawn carries 937 pounds (425 kilograms) of Xenon gas, to which it gives an electric charge to create ions that are then catapulted out of its engines at nearly 90,000 miles per hour (144,840 kph). Over time, the ion push builds up, and allows Dawn to change its flight path to first rendezvous, then orbit, multiple targets like Vesta and Ceres without requiring massive amounts of conventional rocket fuel.

"The first time I ever heard of ion propulsion was in a 'Star Trek' episode," said Rayman, adding that such engines are also touted to propel the TIE fighters – or Twin Ion Engine - of "Star Wars" fame. "Dawn does the TIE fighter one better because it has three ion engines."

While it will take Dawn four days to go from zero to 60 miles per hour (96 kph), the probe will gradually pick up speed as it fires its ion drive nonstop for the next six years, NASA has said, adding that the mission is the agency's first operational science expedition powered by ion propulsion.

"That would make it the longest powered flight in space history," said Keyur Patel, NASA's Dawn project manager at JPL, just before liftoff.

Each of the three ion engines weighs about 20 pounds (nine kilograms) and is about the size of a basketball.

"From such a little engine you can get this blue beam of rocket exhaust that shoots out at 89,000 miles per hour," Patel said before launch day. "It is a remarkable system."


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: asteroids; ceres; dawn; dawnspacecraft; nasa; space; vesta
It's eight year mission, to explore strange new worlds, to boldly go where no probe has gone before!

Sorry, couldn't resist. It's the geek in me.

1 posted on 09/27/2007 1:10:46 PM PDT by saganite
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To: saganite

Westerners continue to explore the expanse of space...meanwhile, Muslims continue to sit in the dirt and perfect the science of the suicide belt.


2 posted on 09/27/2007 1:14:13 PM PDT by Slapshot68
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To: saganite

The LIVE launch thread

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1902160/posts

1325 GMT (9:25 a.m. EDT)

“With the launch of Dawn, ULA is continuing to show its dedication to providing safe, cost-effective, reliable access to space for U.S. government missions,” said Mark Wilkins, vice president of Delta Programs at United Launch Alliance. “ULA has brought together the most talented professionals in the launch industry and we are honored to launch spacecraft, such as Dawn, supporting NASA’s critical national mission to explore the universe.”


The entire universe! but first, this here asteroid.


3 posted on 09/27/2007 1:16:56 PM PDT by RightWhale (25 degrees today. Phase state change accomplished.)
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To: saganite
the Atlantis Ocean splashdown zone

Interesting.

4 posted on 09/27/2007 1:19:04 PM PDT by Izzy Dunne (Hello, I'm a TAGLINE virus. Please help me spread by copying me into YOUR tag line.)
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To: Slapshot68
Now that is too funny.

The best humor contains just a little bit of truth.

5 posted on 09/27/2007 1:19:25 PM PDT by GreenOgre (mohammed is the false prophet of a false god.)
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To: RightWhale

Did a search for Dawn and didn’t come up with the live thread. Seems to happen to me a lot!

The most exciting thing to me about this mission is the use of the Ion engine. First operational mission. Go baby go!


6 posted on 09/27/2007 1:20:29 PM PDT by saganite
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To: saganite

I don’t know how many ion motors have flown, but they seem to run forever and get no respect since they are quiet and low impact. Ion motor tech will open space to resource development once the Treaty is repealed.


7 posted on 09/27/2007 1:24:22 PM PDT by RightWhale (25 degrees today. Phase state change accomplished.)
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To: saganite

Event Horizon


8 posted on 09/27/2007 1:28:48 PM PDT by cyborg (Long Island Half Marathon finisher!)
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To: saganite

“Each of the three ion engines weighs about 20 pounds (nine kilograms) and is about the size of a basketball.”

I wonder how much ion’s cost per barrell....


9 posted on 09/27/2007 1:29:25 PM PDT by PrairieLady2
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To: saganite
You know, it's not that I mind these probes.  I like seeing some of the data derived by the efforts, no doubt about it.  I must point out though, that it has been since the mid-70s, some thirty years ago since we have ACTUALLY (AS HUMAN BEINGS) gone where no man has gone before.  And in truth, it hasn't been since 1969 that we actually did, some 38 years ago.
It is with this in mind that I relate what my first reacion is every time I hear of another one of these missions.

Ladies and Gentlemen, the President of the United States.

I'm glad you all could be here this afternoon, or listen in by radio or television.  I would like to tell you about plans that I have developed to get us back to the moon and beyond.

Today I am initiating a process that will get us back to the moon by 1980, 1987, 1993, 1995, 2001, 2007, 2012, 2017...


Every time one of these probes takes off, it puts off the day when we'll finally get boots on a firm surface outside the confines of our planet or near earth space.  Enough already!

I actually expected to enter space myself at one point, even if only on a spacecraft, or perhaps to visit a space hotel, or maybe even a moon base.

Our space program is so lost in space, it doesn't even realize it's main purpose has been dumped so humans playing with remote controled toys can have their bundle of fun, while the rest of us give up our dreams.

We are standing at the edge of the frontier.  It's time to adventure out in our own covered wagon.  Thank God our forefathers didn't have electronics, or the people in Jersey would only have sand from the pacific coast, and some great pictures of redwood forests and other noteable points.  No Europeans would have stepped foot out here in the west yet, but man what great pictures they would have had, and of course some sand.  Can't forget the sand...

NASA, if you can't get your ass out of that comfy chair, turn out the F'n lights, close the door, put a padlock on it and lets start to spread the money around to someone who will build their covered wagon and venture out from behind their desk.

Yeah, I know.  We've got those wagons that go to Topeka a few times a year and return, but that doesn't cut it for people who really do want a space program for something other than glorified tinker toys to go where no glorified tinker toys have gone before.

Whiz or get of the pot.

Forward ho...
10 posted on 09/27/2007 1:35:11 PM PDT by DoughtyOne (Hillary has pay fever. There she goes now... "Ha Hsu, ha hsu, haaaa hsu, ha hsu...")
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To: RightWhale

Deep Space One was flown by NASA as a test bed which included proving the Ion Engine and the Japanese currently have Hayabusa on it’s return trip to Earth, hopefully with some asteroid soil samples. ESA flew one last year on a moon mission and in addition to those missions there are several ion engines performing on Earth satellites as station keeping thrusters.

Over a year ago I read an article about some Australian engineers and scientists who had developed a new ion thruster 10 times as efficient as the ones currently in use. Four times the thrust too.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_Space_1

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hayabusa


11 posted on 09/27/2007 1:41:34 PM PDT by saganite
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To: saganite

bump


12 posted on 09/27/2007 1:43:03 PM PDT by Captain Beyond (The Hammer of the gods! (Just a cool line from a Led Zep song))
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To: DoughtyOne

Manned space flight as currently structured is an enormous waste of resources. NASA scientists have to beg to get missions like this one funded which will return actual science. Meanwhile we spend twice the total cost of Dawn every time we put the Shuttle up there to carry new parts and supplies to the ISS and go in circles. I’m looking forward to the private sector taking over manned flight and near earth exploration. At least it will be cost effective.


13 posted on 09/27/2007 1:46:00 PM PDT by saganite
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To: saganite

The Hyabusa ship has been lost and recovered several times. It should have disappeared a couple years ago, but the engineers have somehow kept it going. It wasn’t going to be possible to return to earth, but here it comes. This is a story of the impossible and would be dramatic if it weren’t happening so slowly and so far from earth and just a robot.


14 posted on 09/27/2007 1:46:34 PM PDT by RightWhale (25 degrees today. Phase state change accomplished.)
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To: KevinDavis

ping


15 posted on 09/27/2007 1:47:06 PM PDT by saganite
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To: saganite

The Mars Rovers are also still roving:

Spaceflightnow.com

Opportunity has descended the inner slope of the 800-meter-wide crater (half a mile wide) to a band of relatively bright bedrock exposed partway down. The rover is in position to touch a selected slab of rock with tools at the end of its robotic arm, after safety checks being commanded because the rover is at a 25-degree tilt. Researchers intend to begin examining the rock with those tools later this week.


16 posted on 09/27/2007 1:48:56 PM PDT by RightWhale (25 degrees today. Phase state change accomplished.)
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To: RightWhale

I’ve kept track of the mission and it’s amazing the number of glitches and near disasters they have overcome to get it headed back this way. Here’s hoping they can bring it home.


17 posted on 09/27/2007 1:49:02 PM PDT by saganite
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To: RightWhale

I saw that too. Amazing little machines.


18 posted on 09/27/2007 1:49:59 PM PDT by saganite
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To: saganite

Okay. Then close NASA down and let some other people pick up the torch. We waste billions of dollars each year on this nonsense and we’re getting nowhere.

We could have been living on other planets by now. Instead we have developed some science that I’m not all that sure we couldn’t have lived without.

If it comes down to it, I’d rather have humans exploring and do with a little less science.

How many hundreds of billions of dollars are we going to burn through, while other nations develop plans to do what we have simply refused to do?

If you want the private sector to do it, then simply tell the feds you’re done. Pack it in.


19 posted on 09/27/2007 1:52:13 PM PDT by DoughtyOne (Hillary has pay fever. There she goes now... "Ha Hsu, ha hsu, haaaa hsu, ha hsu...")
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To: DoughtyOne

I wouldn’t mind seeing JPL take control of NASA and NASA’s budget for a few years just to see how it goes. JPL at least seems to want to get into space.


20 posted on 09/27/2007 1:57:19 PM PDT by cripplecreek (Greed is NOT a conservative ideal.)
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To: DoughtyOne

The unmanned side of NASA works really well. I agree the manned program needs to be scrapped including the ISS. Bigelow will have something better and cheaper up and running in ten years anyway. As for Dawn not accomplishing anything worthwhile, scientists believe there’s water on Ceres (I think). That’s the kind of knowledge I would consider worthwhile, especially if we’re going to be sending those Conestogas out there.


21 posted on 09/27/2007 1:57:19 PM PDT by saganite
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To: saganite
Funny you should mention Star Trek. Previously our probes were designed either to fly by one or more bodies, or to orbit a single Body. Like the starships in Star Trek, Dawn enters into an orbit around a body, studies it, then breaks orbit to set course for another body.
22 posted on 09/27/2007 2:01:14 PM PDT by jmcenanly
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To: saganite

Some of those bodies are water. All water. Frozen of course. We could hook up some ion motors and bring one or more to the moon.


23 posted on 09/27/2007 2:03:41 PM PDT by RightWhale (25 degrees today. Phase state change accomplished.)
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To: saganite

Look, to a certain extent I’m playing the devils advocate here. I’m not here to pester you guys, but dang folks. You want to know if there’s water on Ceres. We haven’t been back to the moon in decades, but water on Ceres is a top priority. That is just senseless to me.

Pick a planet, any planet and let’s find out what we need to go there and do it. As we branch out, THEN we need to know about Ceres, not now.

What is NASAs budget each year. What does that amount to over 35 years? Where’s the beef?


24 posted on 09/27/2007 2:03:46 PM PDT by DoughtyOne (Hillary has pay fever. There she goes now... "Ha Hsu, ha hsu, haaaa hsu, ha hsu...")
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To: DoughtyOne

Where’s the beef?

Cheaper to find out if there’s really anything worth going out there for with these (relatively) inexpensive probes. No sense funding a 100 billion dollar manned mission to Mars if there’s nothing there worth studying. Now, if one of those probes detects life? Then 100 billion would be cheap to go check it out.


25 posted on 09/27/2007 2:18:22 PM PDT by saganite
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To: saganite

Watched this Delta rocket take off this morning, jut after sun up and it was a beautiful launch.
Lots of rain lately so the sky was very clean and you could see this go for a very long time.


26 posted on 09/27/2007 2:44:06 PM PDT by Joe Boucher (An enemy of Islam)
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To: Joe Boucher

Was that you a couple months ago that commented he watched a launch from his boat?


27 posted on 09/27/2007 2:53:47 PM PDT by saganite
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To: saganite
Rusty: Ya' got Asteroids?

Cousin Dale: Naw, but my dad does. Can't even sit on the toilet some days.

28 posted on 09/27/2007 2:58:18 PM PDT by steveo (Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.)
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To: saganite

So let me see if I have this about right. We know the moon has no atmosphere, it’s gravity is much less than ours and we want to know about our solar system. So instead of building a base on the moon with a great telescope and other useful things, we spend a considerable sum of money on sending probes to asteroids and other planets we won’t be ready to explore for the next what, 250 years? Check that, at this rate lets make that 500.

Once again, what is the NASA budget and what have we gotten for the hundreds of billions spent over the last 35 years?

We went to the moon in about eight years. It will be at least 40, perhaps even 50 before we get back there. Is this really the proof that the unmanned space program is accomplishing all we want in space? If we’re just spending $10 billion a year, and I don’t think that is true, that’s $480 billion dollars. I’m not actually sure if that includes JPL’s budget, which does the majority of the heavy duty assessment of NASAs data recovery.


29 posted on 09/27/2007 3:38:12 PM PDT by DoughtyOne (Hillary has pay fever. There she goes now... "Ha Hsu, ha hsu, haaaa hsu, ha hsu...")
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To: saganite

Sorry about that. Check the $480 billion figure and replace it with $350 billion plus. Thanks.


30 posted on 09/27/2007 3:39:48 PM PDT by DoughtyOne (Hillary has pay fever. There she goes now... "Ha Hsu, ha hsu, haaaa hsu, ha hsu...")
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To: saganite

31 posted on 09/27/2007 3:44:24 PM PDT by mgstarr ("Some of us drink because we're not poets." Arthur (1981))
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To: Slapshot68

“Westerners continue to explore the expanse of space...meanwhile, Muslims continue to sit in the dirt and perfect the science of the suicide belt.”

That is my new tagline. Good work...


32 posted on 09/27/2007 3:46:41 PM PDT by HereInTheHeartland (Westerners continue to explore the expanse of space...meanwhile, Muslims continue to sit in the dirt)
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To: saganite

I watched the launch this morning. It was fantastic!


33 posted on 09/27/2007 3:47:07 PM PDT by ChadGore (VISUALIZE 62,041,268 Bush fans. We Vote.)
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To: DoughtyOne

Clearly NASA’s goal is not primarily space exploration. Must be something else. What, then?


34 posted on 09/27/2007 4:09:13 PM PDT by RightWhale (25 degrees today. Phase state change accomplished.)
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To: RightWhale

35 years, $350 billion dollars and about all we have to show for it is a shuttle that we cross our finges for every time it lefits off, and a space station for which we likely paid 75% of the cost, yet call it an international space station.

If you think I’m being too picky, so be it. I think that’s a fair judgement. It’s as fair as mine is.

Look, I’ve voiced my opinion and it’s okay by me if you folks want to come down on me for doing it.

I realize not all the decisions were made by NASA, but the end result is, we’re not getting the job done.

Where’s the technology spin-off today, like the R&D from the sixties gave us. A concerted effort to develop an effort to the moon and beyond would provide great boost to our economy today if we’d get with it.


35 posted on 09/27/2007 4:22:03 PM PDT by DoughtyOne (Hillary has pay fever. There she goes now... "Ha Hsu, ha hsu, haaaa hsu, ha hsu...")
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To: DoughtyOne

NASA’s budget runs about 25 billion a year IIRC. Of that 80-90 percent goes to the useless manned program. That’s why you don’t see th benefits you’d expect from the unmanned side. It gets the scraps doing real work while the manned program sucks up most of the money accomplishing nothing.


36 posted on 09/27/2007 5:40:04 PM PDT by saganite
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To: saganite

spaceflightnow.com

Vesta is a very dense, igneous object from which we get plentiful meteorites. About 5 percent of the meteorites that fall on Earth come from the asteroid Vesta.


Very dense.


37 posted on 09/28/2007 8:58:58 AM PDT by RightWhale (25 degrees today. Phase state change accomplished.)
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To: saganite

If the unmanned program could be run on the $2.5 to $5.0 billion you suggest, I’d support it. I’m not against scientific research per se, I’m just tired of us failing to move humans into space in a serious manner.

Currently our cost to put a pound of payload into space is too high. I would stop the manned program in eighteen months. I would provide funding for an x-prise for each of about three projects.

The first firm to develop a manned cargo/personel vessel that could take off from a runway and dock with the space station would get $10 billion dollars.

The first firm to develop a manned space trasnport and light cargo vessel that could leave the space station and fly to the moon, land spend one month and return, would get $7 billion dollars.

The first firm to develop a manned space vessel that would remain in space at the space station, and be utilized as part of a space maintenance and construction program would get $2 billion dollars.

I would like to expand on this, but I can’t now.

Thanks for the comments.

Take care.


38 posted on 09/28/2007 10:21:41 AM PDT by DoughtyOne (Hillary has pay fever. There she goes now... "Ha Hsu, ha hsu, haaaa hsu, ha hsu...")
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