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How a Volcano Eruption Wiped Away Summer (Tambora)
NPR ^ | 10-22-2007 | Michael Sullivan

Posted on 10/26/2007 11:07:21 AM PDT by blam

How a Volcano Eruption Wiped Away Summer

by Michael Sullivan


Jessica Goldstein, NPR

For more than two decades, volcanologist Haraldur Sigurdsson has been researching the volcanic eruption of Tambora. By studying layers of soil, he can decipher the history of the explosion.

The biggest volcanic eruption ever recorded in human history took place nearly 200 years ago on Sumbawa, an island in the middle of the Indonesian archipelago.

The volcano is called Tambora, and according to University of Rhode Island volcanologist Haraldur Sigurdsson, the eruption is one of the most overlooked in recorded history.

Tambora's explosion was 10 times bigger than Krakatoa and more than 100 times bigger than Vesuvius or Mount St. Helens. Approximately 100,000 died in its shadow.

"The eruption went up about 43 kilometers into the atmosphere. That is about 30 miles — much higher than any airplane fly[ing] today — and emitting a volume that is about 100 cubic kilometers of molten rock in the form of ash and pumice," Sigurdsson says. "That volume is by far the largest volume of any volcanic eruption in life on earth."

Global Cooling

But it was the enormous cloud of gas — some 400 million tons of it — released by the eruption that produced the "year without summer."

When the gas reacted with water vapor in the atmosphere, it formed tiny little droplets of sulfuric acid that became suspended in the stratosphere, creating a veil over the Earth, Sigurdsson says.

This veil of gas acted like a mirror, bouncing radiation back into space and decreasing the amount of heat that reached the Earth's surface, causing global cooling, he says.

Of course, no one knew that at the time, and few people know about it even now. It wasn't until the early '80s, Sigurdsson says, that he caught the Tambora bug. In that decade, researchers taking core samples in Greenland's ice made an amazing discovery.

"You drill down through the ice, and you can count the rings just like in a tree. And people started doing research on the layers, and they found there was a whacking great sulfur concentration at one particular layer: 1816," Sigurdsson says.

"That was first evidence that Tambora had global reach … and that it was unstudied," he says, adding, "We needed to get much more info on what really happened here."

The Year Without Summer

The year after Tambora erupted, Europe was trying to cope with the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars.

There was a mass demobilization of soldiers flooding into the labor market.

Patrick Webb, a dean at Tufts University's Friedman School of Nutrition Science, describes the socio-political climate after the wars.

"You had economies disrupted, infrastructure damaged, governments in limbo," Webb says. "And so the conditions were already ripe for something to go wrong."

And something did go wrong in 1816, known as "the year without summer." Temperatures dropped, crops failed and people starved.

"Hundreds of thousands of people died. People were reduced to eating rats and fighting over roots," Webb says. "Most of these people were killed by epidemic disease, [such as] typhus and other things related to starvation. They simply couldn't find enough food."

In America, New Englanders saw snow well into the summer — the average temperature in July and August was 5 to 10 degrees below normal, according to Webb.

A Bad Vintage Year

Even the wine from 1816 was bad.

Alain Vauthier, who owns one of the oldest vineyards in Bordeaux, France, keeps a fair bit of wine from each vintage in the cellar. He has an impressive collection, which stretches back to the beginning of the 19th century, but there are only a few bottles from 1816. Vauthier says that's as it should be.

"It is not a good vintage," Vauthier says. "It is a bad time, bad weather, bad summer."

Daniel Lawton is the owner of Bordeaux's oldest wine brokerage house. His assessment of the 1816 vintage is even less charitable.

"Detestable, you understand? Horrible," Lawton says. "A quarter of the normal crop. Very difficult to make good wine. Just a terrible year."

All of this was triggered by a volcanic eruption that happened on the other side of the world.

Reading the Layers of Earth

For more than two decades, Sigurdsson, the volcanologist, has been gathering information from the Indonesian island. His first trip to the volcano, Tambora, was in 1986, and his most recent trip was just a few months ago. His task is made easier, he says, by the scrupulous record keeping done by the earth itself. The layers of the soil on the island are not unlike the layers of ice in faraway Greenland.

"Each layer [is] like [a] page in [a] book. These layers are really a graphic representation of the eruption," Sigurdsson says. "They are drawing out for us, writing down for us, the history of the volcano. And they don't lie."

While he was digging, Sigurdsson discovered something else: artifacts and remains carbonized when Tambora erupted. He calls his excavation site "The Lost Kingdom of Tambora" — a find he also refers to as "The Pompeii of the East."

"I have studied deposits in Pompeii and Herculaneum, from the great destruction of Vesuvius in 79 A.D. [It's] the same mode of destruction, the same mode of death. But [the] difference here [is] that the human remains are much more carbonized—almost entirely carbonized," Sigurdsson says.

"The bones are a piece of charcoal," he says. That tells scientists that it was a much bigger explosion — with much higher temperatures.

The explosion was hot enough to melt glass, and it happened so fast, Sigurdsson says, that people living on the island had no chance to escape. The carbonized remains of one woman recovered at the site confirm this.

"She is lying on her back with her hands outstretched. She is holding a machete or a big knife in one hand. There is a sarong over her shoulder. The sarong is totally carbonized, just like her bones," Sigurdsson says. "Her head is resting on the kitchen floor, just caught there instantly and blown over by the flow."

The Lessons of Tambora

All the big volcanic eruptions — Tambora, Krakatau, Pinatubo — have ended up cooling the Earth, causing temperatures to drop.

And that, Sigurdsson says, has some people thinking about replicating the Tambora effect in an effort to slow global warming.

"People have proposed that we induce artificial volcanoes by bringing sulfur up into the stratosphere to produce this effect," Sigurdsson says.

But, he warns, "Do you want to counter one pollutant with another one? I don't think so. But that's been proposed."

Still, Sigurdsson thinks that lessons from eruptions like Tambora can be applied to models used to study global climate change.

Global warming is viewed by many as the most pressing, most dangerous threat. But Sigurdsson warns that catastrophic climate change might come from an unexpected, yet familiar, direction.

"Somewhere on the Earth, with[in] the next 1,000 years, there will be a comparable eruption. And we'd better be aware of the consequences," he says.

He notes that another giant volcanic blast would release large amounts of gases, creating interference in the atmosphere that could cause major disruptions in telecommunications and aviation.

Sigurdsson hopes to study and learn more about Tambora when he returns next year.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: catastrophism; eruption; godsgravesglyphs; summer; tambora; volcano

1 posted on 10/26/2007 11:07:22 AM PDT by blam
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To: SunkenCiv
Catastrophism ping.

Here's the volcano that nearly killed us all:

Late Pleostocene Human Population Bottlenecks. . . (Toba)

2 posted on 10/26/2007 11:13:36 AM PDT by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: blam

A distant relative of Bush was the cause of this horrible eruption .


3 posted on 10/26/2007 11:13:51 AM PDT by Renegade
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To: blam
Excellent post. But the author neglects to tell us how this can be blamed on George Bush, which is required in any article talking about global cooling or warming.

Now as for these algorani suggesting a sulfur shield: what happens if President Hillary directs NASA to put up the shield and then there's another Tambora? Will it save the polar bears?.

4 posted on 10/26/2007 11:14:28 AM PDT by Zerodown (Draft Petraeus. Or how about Pace? What do you say we win this one?)
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To: blam

Let me get this straight. Volcanoes release sulfur, a pollutant, into the atmosphere, it reflects sunlight into space, thus cooling the planet. Then why are we removing sulfur from our fuels?........


5 posted on 10/26/2007 11:15:41 AM PDT by Red Badger ( We don't have science, but we have consensus.......)
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To: blam

Funny...the subject came up the other day about weather fluctuations, and I mentioned the year that had no summer and how in England that was the basis for several years of Currier and Ives White Christmas scenes, which are apparently unusual in England before or since. When asked why, I said it was a volcanic eruption, but could not remember the name...as I searched my memory, a pictograph of relative eruption sizes flashed into my head, and I remembered Tambora was WAY WAY bigger than Krakatoa or Pinatubo...so I said that must have been it...:)


6 posted on 10/26/2007 11:16:08 AM PDT by rlmorel (Liberals: If the Truth would help them, they would use it.)
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To: Renegade
Nah, W and Karl just grabbed the weather machine and jumped into the time machine. ;)
7 posted on 10/26/2007 11:16:41 AM PDT by PCBMan (We hit a snag when the universe imploded. But Dad seemed cautiously optimistic.)
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To: blam

Rove’s early version of his Volcano Machine?


8 posted on 10/26/2007 11:18:36 AM PDT by RSmithOpt (Liberalism: Highway to Hell)
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To: blam

Any volcano ready to erupt will first have to purchase enough carbon credits to offset the co2 to be spewed or algore is going to pitch a fit.


9 posted on 10/26/2007 11:21:29 AM PDT by AU72
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To: rlmorel
Eighteen Hundred And Froze To Death (The Infamous 'Year Without Summer')
10 posted on 10/26/2007 11:24:09 AM PDT by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: blam

OK...though rare, how about a 1 mile wide rock from outer space splashing into one of our oceans at 30,000 mph.???It’ll still be global warming and Bush’s fault.


11 posted on 10/26/2007 11:27:36 AM PDT by RSmithOpt (Liberalism: Highway to Hell)
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To: blam
Oh no.... Global Warming!
...oh no...GLOBAL COOLING!
...oh no...GLOBAL WARMING>
...oh no...GLOBAL COOLING>

Oh no.... GoreBull Warming!


12 posted on 10/26/2007 11:28:09 AM PDT by Bon mots
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To: Zerodown

You got it backwards- for an article like this you’re not supposed to blame Bush, you should be figuring out how to credit Al Gore. Maybe his great-great-great grandfather purchased lots of carbon offsets that year.


13 posted on 10/26/2007 11:29:31 AM PDT by Squawk 8888 (Is human activity causing the warming trend on Mars?)
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To: blam
From an 1816 timeline:

Cold weather persists through summer in much of the world's temperate zones, apparently as a result of dust in the atmosphere following last year's volcanic eruption in the East Indies. Frost occurs from Canada to Virginia every night from June 6 to June 9, laundry laid out to dry on the grass at Plymouth, Connecticut, June 10 is found frozen stiff, heavy snows fall in the Northeast in June and July, and frost kills crops in what farmers will call "eighteen hundred and froze to death."

14 posted on 10/26/2007 11:30:46 AM PDT by johnny7 ("But that one on the far left... he had crazy eyes")
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To: blam
That volume is by far the largest volume of any volcanic eruption in life on earth."

Curious. He claims it would be 100 times greater than Mt St Helens yet, the Yellowstone Caldera had a force 2400 times greater than Mt. ST Helens. Perhaps he's just referring to the volume of material? Somehow the math isn't workin for me.

15 posted on 10/26/2007 11:40:12 AM PDT by Malsua
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To: Malsua
http://volcano.und.edu/vwdocs/eruption_scale.html

Somehow the math isn't workin for me.

You are correct, Yellowstone was the mother of all eruptions.

16 posted on 10/26/2007 11:48:50 AM PDT by Doomonyou (Let them eat lead.)
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To: blam
When the gas reacted with water vapor in the atmosphere, it formed tiny little droplets of sulfuric acid that became suspended in the stratosphere, creating a veil over the Earth, Sigurdsson says.

This points to a way of engineering the climate, if we really wanted to do something like cool off the Earth. So specifically how much of a cooling would everyone vote for? How much cooling would Canadians or Russians vote for?

17 posted on 10/26/2007 11:52:14 AM PDT by BlazingArizona
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To: Zerodown

Interestingly the liberals will now have to keep Bush the bogyman alive, if only to slander his memory...;’}


18 posted on 10/26/2007 11:57:31 AM PDT by rockrr (Global warming is to science what Islam is to religion)
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To: Malsua
He claims it would be 100 times greater than Mt St Helens yet, the Yellowstone Caldera had a force 2400 times greater than Mt. ST Helens. Perhaps he's just referring to the volume of material? Somehow the math isn't workin for me.

I think he meant in recorded human history. Mt. Toba was pretty big too.

19 posted on 10/26/2007 12:09:12 PM PDT by Andrew Byler
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To: BlazingArizona
Cooling, not warming, is the nemesis of life. Even with the evidence of this summer right in front of them, they don’t get it. I just hope no global warming kool-aid drinker ever succeeds in trying to intervene with the atmosphere in a big way.
20 posted on 10/26/2007 12:11:26 PM PDT by colorado tanker (I'm unmoderated - just ask Bill O'Reilly)
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To: blam

ping


21 posted on 10/26/2007 12:21:18 PM PDT by TYVets (God so loved the world he didn't send a committee)
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To: Red Badger
One of the noxious volcanoes in the early 1980s created a maintenance headache for the airlines.

The large amount of sulfur thrown into the upper atmosphere created a lot of sulphuric acid that was scoring the windows on passenger jets, and customers were complaining about it.

They had to shorten the window polishing cycle.

Probably painting, too.

22 posted on 10/26/2007 12:35:01 PM PDT by Calvin Locke
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To: Red Badger
Let me get this straight. Volcanoes release sulfur, a pollutant, into the atmosphere, it reflects sunlight into space, thus cooling the planet. Then why are we removing sulfur from our fuels?........

Any sulfur released from the surface never makes it to the upper atmosphere to form sulfuric acid and block sunlight. It's just a pollutant.

Ozone is similar-ozone in the upper atmosphere blocks UV, making life possible, but Ozone at the surface is an irritating pollutant.

23 posted on 10/26/2007 12:39:36 PM PDT by Strategerist
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To: Red Badger
Volcanoes release sulfur, a pollutant, into the atmosphere, it reflects sunlight into space, thus cooling the planet. Then why are we removing sulfur from our fuels?

Lissen Badger, we don't pay you to think. This kind of talk will earn you a bunk in the Hillary-Gore Re-Education Center after the election.

24 posted on 10/26/2007 12:39:38 PM PDT by Zerodown (Draft Petraeus. Or how about Pace? What do you say we win this one?)
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To: Strategerist
Any sulfur released from the surface never makes it to the upper atmosphere to form sulfuric acid and block sunlight. It's just a pollutant. Ozone is similar-ozone in the upper atmosphere blocks UV, making life possible, but Ozone at the surface is an irritating pollutant.

Makes you wonder then how Chloroflourocarbons (CFC) get out of air conditioner units and manage to float up into the ozone layer. Are they somehow lighter than air, despite the enormous number of atoms in each molecule?

25 posted on 10/26/2007 1:02:54 PM PDT by Andrew Byler
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To: blam

There was an article some months ago about during this dreary summer the book Frankenstein was written.


26 posted on 10/26/2007 1:17:59 PM PDT by VA Voter
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To: Doomonyou; Malsua
"You are correct, Yellowstone was the mother of all eruptions."

I thought we we talking only during human history. (?) Yellowstone last erupted 640,000 years ago.

27 posted on 10/26/2007 1:38:52 PM PDT by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: VA Voter
"There was an article some months ago about during this dreary summer the book Frankenstein was written."

Yup. I saw that on TV too.

28 posted on 10/26/2007 1:44:14 PM PDT by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: Malsua
He meant the largest in historical times. I’m not sure how it compared with Santorini (Thera) although that is a far closer comparison than Krakatoa, and must have had far greater effect on history than Tambora. There must have been old people who experienced both Tambora and Krakatoa, but have you ever read of a personal comparison? Tambora was virtually lost to history within a generation, something almost as impressive as its size. The mid-Yellowstone sized Toba was pre-historical (I don’t think even the dream times go back quite that far) and nearly prevented history by wiping us out.
29 posted on 10/26/2007 7:01:47 PM PDT by JohnBovenmyer
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To: 75thOVI; AFPhys; Alice in Wonderland; AndrewC; aristotleman; Avoiding_Sulla; BenLurkin; Berosus; ...
Thanks Blam.
 
Catastrophism
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30 posted on 10/26/2007 11:13:36 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Monday, October 22, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: blam; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 24Karet; 3AngelaD; 49th; ...

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·

 
Gods
Graves
Glyphs
Thanks Blam. I've liked Tambora since his Bon Jovi days.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are Blam, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

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31 posted on 10/26/2007 11:15:45 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Monday, October 22, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: blam

Take a good look at that guy’s picture. Notice the strange way his cloths bunch and bulge?

I wonder if he has his Robe of Warm-mongering hidden underneath? He’s probably an acolyte of the Alar Goracle. Or maybe even one of his Profits of Doomination.


32 posted on 10/26/2007 11:54:19 PM PDT by Grimmy (equivocation is but the first step along the road to capitulation)
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To: Doomonyou

I believe Toba was bigger. It cooled the Earth by 10 degrees celcius for almost 1,000 years.


33 posted on 10/27/2007 12:41:47 AM PDT by djf (Send Fred some bread! Not a whole loaf, a slice or two will do!)
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To: djf

Between the volcanos, calderas, and asteroid impacts, we are darn lucky that humans even exist on this planet, and have lasted this long. (How long? It’s a hard question to answer without provoking needless argument)


34 posted on 10/27/2007 1:00:23 AM PDT by UCANSEE2 (- Attention all planets of the solar Federation--Secret plan codeword: Banana)
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To: SunkenCiv

Yes, I’ve heard of this eruption. It made me call this year “the year without a fall,” because it was unseasonably hot here in Kentucky until this week. Don’t worry, I didn’t blame it on global warming.

But now that Joe Biden’s in the news again, I’m concerned. We all know how much hot air he produces!


35 posted on 10/27/2007 4:48:07 AM PDT by Berosus ("The candidates that can't face Fox News can't face Al Qaeda."--Roger Ailes)
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To: timer

Ping


36 posted on 10/27/2007 10:20:47 AM PDT by investigateworld ( Abortion stops a beating heart.)
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To: rlmorel
Currier and Ives were not British. They were American and thier artwork were American, not English scenes. See here.
37 posted on 10/27/2007 12:18:24 PM PDT by Alas Babylon!
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To: RSmithOpt

“OK...though rare, how about a 1 mile wide rock from outer space splashing into one of our oceans at 30,000 mph.???It’ll still be global warming and Bush’s fault.”

Funny that you mention outer space splashing some big pebbles...Someone’s deceased spouse told them in a dream recently to keep an eye on the constellation Pegasus.


38 posted on 10/27/2007 6:13:23 PM PDT by Domestic Church (AMDG...)
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To: djf

Yes, Toba was bigger. It nearly wiped out the human race, reduced the world population to ~70K, but that was before recorded history.

I wonder if it rained ash for 40 days and 40 nights...


39 posted on 10/28/2007 5:56:33 AM PDT by null and void (Franz Kafka would have killed himself in despair if he lived in the world we inhabit today.)
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