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Giving Makes You Rich
CONDÉ NAST PORTFOLIO ^ | November 2007 | Arthur C. Brooks

Posted on 11/11/2007 12:36:48 PM PST by Vision Thing

In John Bunyan’s 1684 classic The Pilgrim’s Progress, the character Old Honest poses this riddle to the innkeeper Gaius: “A man there was, tho’ some did count him mad, / The more he cast away, the more he had.” Gaius solves the riddle thus: “He that bestows his Goods upon the Poor / Shall have as much again, and ten times more.”

Less poetically, the idea is this: Giving makes you rich. A lovely sentiment, to be sure, but quite backward-sounding to an economist. You obviously have to have money before you can give it away, right? Or in the pithy words of former British prime minister Margaret Thatcher, “No one would remember the Good Samaritan if he’d only had good intentions—he had money too.”

Well, it turns out that Gaius was right, and new economic research backs him up. Emerging evidence—crunchy statistics from real data, not the mushy self-help stuff—supports the contention that giving stimulates prosperity, for both individuals and nations. Charity, it appears, can really make you rich.

The United States is a remarkably charitable nation. The Giving U.S.A. Foundation estimates that Americans donated nearly $300 billion to charity in 2006—more than the gross domestic product (the annualized value of goods and services produced within a nation) of all but 33 countries in the world. More than three-quarters of this came from private individuals. Additional research suggests that between 65 and 85 percent of Americans give to charities each year.

How does all this generosity relate to our high average levels of prosperity? Let’s begin with individuals and families. The Social Capital Community Benchmark Survey, completed in 2000, is a survey of about 30,000 people in more than 40 communities across the U.S. and is the best single source of data available on the civic participation of Americans. The S.C.C.B.S., which takes into account differences in education, age, race, religion, and other personal characteristics, shows that people who give charitably make significantly more money than those who don’t. While that seems like common sense, it turns out that the link in the data between giving and earning is not just one-way. People do give more when they become richer—research has shown that a 10 percent increase in income stimulates giving by about 7 percent—but people also grow wealthier when they give more.

How do we know this? When two variables like giving and income are interrelated, economists use something called an instrumental variable to see which is pushing and which is pulling. In a nutshell, that means selecting something that’s closely related to donations but not directly to income, like volunteering. Volunteers tend to be money givers and vice versa because of the same charitable impulse. But income doesn’t always directly affect volunteering. (While people have differing amounts of money, they all have the same amount of time.)

We start by predicting how much money people would donate based on how much they volunteer, regardless of income. This projection essentially strips out the role of income in giving. Next, see if that predicted donation level correlates with income. If it does and the correlation is positive, it means that giving pushes up income and not just vice versa.

This is precisely what is found in the S.C.C.B.S. data: More giving doesn’t just correlate with higher income; it causes higher income. And not just a little. Imagine two families that are identical in size, age, race, education, religion, and politics. The only difference is that this year the first family gives away $100 more than the second. Based on my analysis of the S.C.C.B.S. survey, the first family will, on average, earn $375 more as a result of its generosity.

How can this be? Is it a statistical anomaly—or even a metaphysical phenomenon? While the link between giving and prosperity is not as mechanistic as returns on municipal bonds, there are some very earthbound explanations for it. Psychologists and neuroscientists have identified several ways that giving makes us more effective and successful. For example, new research from the University of Oregon finds that charity stimulates parts of the brain called the caudate nucleus and the nucleus accumbens, which are associated with meeting basic needs such as food and shelter—suggesting to the researchers that our brains know that giving is good for us. Experiments have also found that people are elevated by others into positions of leadership after they are witnessed behaving charitably.

The financial advantages of giving aren’t limited to individual givers. There is also evidence that donations push up income even more at the level of an entire nation’s economy. We can demonstrate this by looking at average household charity and per capita G.D.P. as they change over time. Charity and G.D.P. levels have moved together over the years. Corrected for inflation and population changes, U.S. government data show that G.D.P. per person in America has risen over the past 50 years by about 150 percent. At the same time, donated dollars per person have risen by about 190 percent.

These trends by themselves don’t tell us which force is pushing and which is pulling, however. To figure that out, we need to determine whether past values of one affect future values of the other. By using a method called vector autoregression, economists can see how changes in this year’s G.D.P. are affected by past values of both G.D.P. and charity. If an increase in last year’s charity levels correlates with a jump in this year’s G.D.P., it is logical to conclude that donating is stimulating the economy.

As in the case of individual income, the evidence is that increases in G.D.P. and giving mutually reinforce each other: Economic growth pushes up charitable giving, and charitable giving pushes up economic growth. Data from the Statistical Abstract of the United States and the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University provide examples: In 2004, $100 in extra income per American drove about $1.47 in additional charitable giving per person. At the same time, $100 in giving stimulated more than $1,800 in increased G.D.P. This rate of social return shows that economic-multiplier effects are not limited to private investment. In short, giving plays a positive role in American economic growth. It is a good investment for our country. Some might even go so far as to say that donating to charity is a patriotic act.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Extended News
KEYWORDS: charity
I've always heard that the more you give, the more you get. Here's someone's attempt at proving it.

If this has always been true, perhaps it'll explain why lib dems hate charitable giving: It enrichens the giver. And we all know how lib dems don't want anyone to become richer, especially if its not from the efforts of their big government programs.

1 posted on 11/11/2007 12:36:49 PM PST by Vision Thing
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To: Vision Thing
As an abstract, the poor will spend the money, and increase economic activity in the community and that raises everyone's boat as it were as the money stays in the community for the most part. Plus, the Laws of God have never been repealed to mankind's detriment...
2 posted on 11/11/2007 12:45:47 PM PST by padre35 (Conservative in Exile/ Isaiah 3.3)
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To: padre35
As an abstract, the poor will spend the money, and increase economic activity in the community and that raises everyone's boat as it were as the money stays in the community for the most part.

It's amazing that this doesn't work for big-goverment programs. You'd figure that the redistribution of wealth would increase economic activity in all cases, but the economic status of the nation during 60s and 70s were proof against this notion.

Also, the article mentions that both individuals and a nation's GDP as a whole become richer through charitable giving. It doesn't mention whether governments become richer when they give money to the poor. I'm betting this is the only time when the Laws of God don't apply.

3 posted on 11/11/2007 12:57:00 PM PST by Vision Thing (hillary is unstable.)
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To: Vision Thing
It's amazing that this doesn't work for big-goverment programs.

Probably because the Government is working with stolen money.

4 posted on 11/11/2007 1:02:26 PM PST by eyedigress
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To: Vision Thing
Winfield Scott Stratton
 
 
Itinerant Carpenter Strikes It Rich
By Ed Hunter, Victor
...
"Stratton continued to practice his quiet acts of philanthropy after the sale when the world thought he would buy mansions and yachts to demonstrate his financial success. Instead, he built the Mining Exchange building in Colorado Springs, donated land for the Downtown Post Office building construction and donated a park to the city for people to enjoy. Stratton also purchased and expanded the trolley car line in Colorado Springs for the benefit of the public."
...

5 posted on 11/11/2007 1:02:42 PM PST by VxH (One if by Land, Two if by Sea, and Three if by Wire Transfer)
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To: eyedigress
Probably because the Government is working with stolen money.

And also perhaps because the government gives not to help the recipients, but to make the recipients more dependent on the goverment.

6 posted on 11/11/2007 1:05:33 PM PST by Vision Thing (hillary is unstable.)
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To: eyedigress
Probably because the Government is working with stolen money.

Great point.

7 posted on 11/11/2007 1:07:54 PM PST by Lijahsbubbe
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To: VxH

Stratton’s giving helped his community. More than likely, he benefited from the increased economic activity resulting from his charitable gifts.


8 posted on 11/11/2007 1:09:41 PM PST by Vision Thing (hillary is unstable.)
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To: Vision Thing

And this goes to the nature of Govt programs, as well as money staying in a community, in the 70’s the economy was much smaller, Govt dollars didn’t have the impact that they have today.

It’s one of the arguments about Capital Flight and the rise of Corporatism.

Govts however, remoe money from local economies and then redistribute it to whomever they are trying to buy off, rather then who provides the best service to the community.


9 posted on 11/11/2007 1:11:10 PM PST by padre35 (Conservative in Exile/ Isaiah 3.3)
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To: Vision Thing

I agree. The percentages won’t change regardless of what you do. Give an uninspired, socially “victimized”, led to believe needs all kinds of help, lazy-ass $500,000. Broke as fast as they can spend it.


10 posted on 11/11/2007 1:12:30 PM PST by eyedigress
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To: Vision Thing

The more LOCAL the charity and the oversight of fund dispensation, the more it gets to where it is really needed.


11 posted on 11/11/2007 1:14:27 PM PST by LZ_Bayonet (There's Always Something.............And there's always something worse!)
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To: LZ_Bayonet

I had a rant on that, but will sum up by saying I totally agree.


12 posted on 11/11/2007 1:21:18 PM PST by eyedigress
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To: LZ_Bayonet

Yup. When the funds travels through fewer layers of beauracracy, fewer people are taking their cut of the funds, leaving more for the intended recipients.


13 posted on 11/11/2007 1:24:27 PM PST by Vision Thing (hillary is unstable.)
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To: Vision Thing
It doesn't mention whether governments become richer when they give money to the poor. I'm betting this is the only time when the Laws of God don't apply.

God's laws apply in this situation, too. Governments don't benefit, because they're not really being charitable, plus they have to steal the money first.

14 posted on 11/11/2007 2:01:55 PM PST by Disambiguator (Political Correctness is criminal insanity writ large.)
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To: eyedigress
Probably because the Government is working with stolen money.

A much bigger issue, IMHO, is that while the recipient of private charity knows that they have no legal or moral right to demand their gift, much less its continuation, a recipient of government welfare has the legal authority to demand present and future payouts. Government-mandated subsidies are prone to corrupting people's behaviors even when run well. Most welfare systems are designed to maximize that corruption.

15 posted on 11/11/2007 2:11:57 PM PST by supercat (Sony delenda est.)
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To: supercat
You said it. I know doctors whom no longer take government welfare recipients, because they don't show up. No retribution to the patient and no way to recoup the time.

Hillary care will be a total failure based on what we know already.

16 posted on 11/11/2007 2:19:30 PM PST by eyedigress
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To: supercat
Milton Friedman showed studies that as government assistance goes up, private giving goes down. The problem is that only 20% of government welfare costs actually go to the poor. The other 80%, local, state, and federal is wasted in administering the programs.

Except for a few bogus charities, like the March of Dimes, most private charities get 50% of their money to the needy. And Churches get 75-80% of their donations to the poor. This is the real reason for public-private programs. Even though it 'violates' the anti-church bias of the government, such programs are 4x to 5x more beneficial than anything the government can do directly.

17 posted on 11/11/2007 2:26:07 PM PST by DJtex
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To: LZ_Bayonet
The more LOCAL the charity and the oversight of fund dispensation, the more it gets to where it is really needed.

Certainly local charities are often better than nationwide bureaucracies, though larger organizations are needed in some cases (e.g. a small locally-based hurricane relief organization probably wouldn't be very helpful, since it would have nothing to do when its area wasn't hit, or be totally swamped with its own problems when it was). The primary difference between charity and government welfare, though, isn't size, but rather entitlement. If there's a law that says people who sit at home on the couch all day will get $X/month, then sitting at home on the couch all day becomes a perfectly legitimate way of "earning" $X/month.

18 posted on 11/11/2007 2:26:53 PM PST by supercat (Sony delenda est.)
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To: eyedigress
Hillary care will be a total failure based on what we know already.

Be very careful with terms like "failure" and "success", since they are extremely viewpoint-dependent. I believe one of Hillary's goals is to trash the health-care system that's available to the middle class, and I believe that Hillarycare, if implemented, would be extremely successful at doing so. Many other liberal programs which are widely derided as failures on FR are likewise very successful when one recognizes their real goals.

The difficulty is in getting others to see what the real function of all those programs is (i.e. pushing 'equality' between the lower and middle class, thus protecting the elite class from competition)

19 posted on 11/11/2007 2:35:33 PM PST by supercat (Sony delenda est.)
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To: padre35
As an abstract, the poor will spend the money, and increase economic activity in the community and that raises everyone's boat as it were as the money stays in the community for the most part.

I wonder what you think of supply side economics.

20 posted on 11/11/2007 2:42:44 PM PST by Moonman62 (The issue of whether cheap labor makes America great should have been settled by the Civil War.)
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To: DJtex
Milton Friedman showed studies that as government assistance goes up, private giving goes down. The problem is that only 20% of government welfare costs actually go to the poor.

The biggest problem with government programs isn't inefficiency. The problem is that by creating a sense of entitlement many of the programs do more harm than good. To be sure, a private charity could implement some the policies that make government welfare so harmful, but such policies are very rare with private charities and very common with government programs.

I find it amazing how many liberals want to eliminate the stigma associated with accepting welfare, rather than recognize that such stigma plays a very important function. The proper way for a person on welfare to stop being stigmatized is not to have government provide stigma-free ways of receiving welfare, but instead to get a job. Some people may have psychological difficulties in that regard, but declaring idleness to be acceptable isn't apt to solve the problem.

21 posted on 11/11/2007 2:44:40 PM PST by supercat (Sony delenda est.)
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To: Vision Thing

Speaking anecdotally i can say this.....throughout my life, every time i got a raise in pay i raised my weekly contribution to the basket they passed around at Mass by Five Bucks. And every time i did that shortly thereafter more raises came AND promotions and things like higher per diems and business travel allowances... and along the way the stock market soared and i pulled out at the peak just before it plunged...im up to 80 bucks a week at present....i’m tellin ya each time i raised the amount that i gave; eventually way more than that came back to me...it’s happened time after time after time....way beyond coincidence.


22 posted on 11/11/2007 2:45:58 PM PST by flat
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To: supercat
Many other liberal programs which are widely derided as failures on FR are likewise very successful when one recognizes their real goals.

That post was worth it's weight in gold. Rush couldn't have said it any better himself. Thanks. :^)

23 posted on 11/11/2007 2:45:59 PM PST by eyedigress
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To: flat

My friends who tithe are the wealthiest friends I have. On the other hand, I have another friend who is one of the most active members in his church, but doesn’t tithe. He struggles financially. I once mentioned the phenomenon of givers who end up receiving more than they give. He hasn’t adopted it yet.

It’s just strange how this phenomenon works. I’m not sure how much this article explains it, but the phenomenon just astounds me.


24 posted on 11/11/2007 2:52:42 PM PST by Vision Thing (hillary is unstable.)
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To: Vision Thing

It’s also quite Biblical. Tithing is more than just a concept to many Christians (unfortunately, not all). Look at the very last page of the Old Testament, in Malachi. In there is the ONLY place in the Bible where God says, in effect, “hey....TRY me on this; just TRY me”......when He is addressing tithing.

Tithe....and I absolutely, positively guarantee you that you will prosper economically. It is patently impossible to out-give God.

Great folks out there like Jerry Savelle have been preaching this for YEARS. He gives more per year than most upper class Americans even make...and more pours in every year. Accordingly, he gives more. As he put it once recently when I saw him speak at our church in NC..”Some try to give me grief for how much money I make. Whenever I hear that, I don’t get angry; I merely respond with ‘oh yeah? well check out my GIVING first, THEN come talk to me’”. He’s right.


25 posted on 11/11/2007 2:53:49 PM PST by RightOnline
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To: Vision Thing

I once mentioned the phenomenon of givers who end up receiving more than they give. He hasn’t adopted it yet.

It’s just strange how this phenomenon works. I’m not sure how much this article explains it, but the phenomenon just astounds me.

I know the article doesn’t seem to ‘splain how or why this is true only that it is true..i too have noticed that the smartest kindest richest people i know are all regular churchgoers...and givers...there’s something to this v/t it seems undeniable...

any body else care to agree or disagree with this?


26 posted on 11/11/2007 3:01:50 PM PST by flat
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To: Vision Thing
[Stratton’s giving helped his community.]
 
Enormously, and his legacy continues today.
 
Some corporations dabble in philanthropy because it provides a warm puppy with which to misdirect the public's attention from corruption and thievery.
 
It appears Winfield Stratton lived to benefit others - not only financially, but through his mentoring, friendship, and example.  That is not something that can be created via government mandate.

27 posted on 11/11/2007 3:07:11 PM PST by VxH (One if by Land, Two if by Sea, and Three if by Wire Transfer)
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To: RightOnline

Thanks for mentioning Malachi. I found the passage that you mentioned. I see proof of this in my churchgoing friends who give. They are doing well. And in those who don’t give, they aren’t doing so well.


28 posted on 11/11/2007 3:10:24 PM PST by Vision Thing (hillary is unstable.)
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To: Moonman62

Supply side Econ 101?

“Steal nasty profits from the “poor” and send the money to buy Chinese worker slaves....”

Oh come on, everyone benefits when less taxes are paid especially when regulations are eased as well.

Let me give you an example:

What if taxes were cut to 10%, and every licensing and insurance mandate were vacated?

The “rich” could buy things in support of the local economy, and the “poor” could deliver those goods and not be overburdened by regulations...


29 posted on 11/11/2007 3:21:02 PM PST by padre35 (Conservative in Exile/ Isaiah 3.3)
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To: VxH; DJtex; supercat
It appears Winfield Stratton lived to benefit others - not only financially, but through his mentoring, friendship, and example. That is not something that can be created via government mandate.

The government must hate citizens such as Stratton. First of all, as DJtex mentioned above, the Strattons of our nation do 4 to 5 times a better job of helping people than government ever could. And secondly, as supercat pointed out in anohter post, government programs may not be intended to help. Instead, they may be secretly intended to harm.

30 posted on 11/11/2007 3:24:59 PM PST by Vision Thing (hillary is unstable.)
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To: padre35
Oh come on, everyone benefits when less taxes are paid especially when regulations are eased as well.

Several months ago, Rush had a caller who was slightly confused by the following two seemingly contradictory facts:

- less taxes result in higher government revenues.

- lib dems want higher taxes despite the previous fact, resulting in less money for their government social programs.

Rush explained that lib dems know that lower taxes will give their programs more money. But this isn't what they really want. Instead, they want to control people. That's why they persist in raising our taxes.

31 posted on 11/11/2007 3:31:26 PM PST by Vision Thing (hillary is unstable.)
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To: RightOnline

Does God not also say that those who sow sparingly shall reap sparingly? Very much like planting corn...


32 posted on 11/11/2007 3:32:52 PM PST by stefanbatory
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To: flat

First, giving is it’s own reward.

Those who give are happier.

That happiness shows, and spreads to others.

Positive things occur in response to positive attitudes.

Second, those who manage their spending enough to ensure they have some to tithe, usually don’t waste their money.

Therefore they would probably keep more of their income than those who can’t ‘spare’ a dime for the church plate.


33 posted on 11/11/2007 3:34:09 PM PST by UCANSEE2 (- Attention all planets of the solar Federation--Secret plan codeword: Banana)
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To: Vision Thing

Here is the thin Vision Thing, Americans are generous people, the so called “rich” are the most generous of all Americans, “rich” America donates unmentioned Billions every year.

A fascinating study found that people in the South were far more generous then Northern people, for me the reasons are simple:

Abandon God’s Laws
Be taxed to death in the meanwhile

The thought of a omnipotent God is not popular in the NE at the moment, so rather then deal with “Love thy neighbor” folks in the NE have to deal with “property tax due by...”


34 posted on 11/11/2007 3:45:36 PM PST by padre35 (Conservative in Exile/ Isaiah 3.3)
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To: padre35

I lived in Boston before I moved here to Dallas. I’ve never seen anyone in Boston offer chartible gifts. And though the people I know in Boston were relatively propserous (how can they not, especially when they needed to cover their high cost of living), I thought most of them were miserable and unhappy. But they seemed to be happy with their high taxes. These two things (the general unhappiness and the taxes) were some of the many reasons I left Boston.

Here in Dallas, I see people give through tithing and volunteer positions. And they are all doing well, which isn’t too hard to do because the cost of living here is relatively low. But, the people in Dallas that I know are far happier than the people I knew in Boston.


35 posted on 11/11/2007 3:55:17 PM PST by Vision Thing (hillary is unstable.)
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To: Vision Thing

I feel you VT, it’s just different “down South”.

Not as much cynacism down South.

At least, not where I come from.


36 posted on 11/11/2007 4:00:17 PM PST by padre35 (Conservative in Exile/ Isaiah 3.3)
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To: UCANSEE2
[Second, those who manage their spending enough to ensure they have some to tithe, usually don’t waste their money.]

Yes, and the deadly sin of Gluttony extends beyond food; McMansion anyone?  I think one of the keys to being content and happy is nurturing simple, healthy, and self-controlled appetites.

There are also measures of wealth that are not monetary; the gifts of time and health, for example.

It seems the time and health of far too many retired folks are often squandered. I suspect many retired professionals would find themselves to be a valuable resource for homeschool providers.


37 posted on 11/11/2007 4:19:54 PM PST by VxH (One if by Land, Two if by Sea, and Three if by Wire Transfer)
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To: padre35

....”As an abstract, the poor will spend the money, and increase economic activity in the community and that raises everyone’s boat as it were as the money stays in the community for the most part.”

Yah. And, in Walmart.


38 posted on 11/11/2007 4:29:53 PM PST by onyx eyes (me and us, together)
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To: Vision Thing

I’d expect that personal giving and government giving are applied very differently. Personal giving involves individual judgements, such as whether the recipient is truly in need, and whether the gift will improve the recipients situation. A small gift to fix up a car and keep the recipient going to work keeps a lot of capital from being idle or otherwise tied up and useless. A government payment, on the other hand, tends to increase idleness and destruction of wealth.


39 posted on 11/11/2007 4:39:48 PM PST by lepton ("It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into"--Jonathan Swift)
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To: onyx eyes

That would be capital flight onyx eyes, a symptom of Consumerism run amok.

Instead of the money being spent at the local grocery being spent at the local gas pump, it flies away to Arkansas, making it unavailable to the community.

It takes money to make money.


40 posted on 11/11/2007 4:47:48 PM PST by padre35 (Conservative in Exile/ Isaiah 3.3)
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To: Vision Thing
59. Huan / Dispersion [Dissolution] When we are working at a task that affects the general welfare, we must leave all private friendships out of account. Only by rising above party interests can we achieve something decisive. He who has the courage thus to forego what is near wins what is afar. But in order to comprehend this standpoint, one must have a wide view of the interrelationships of life, such as only unusual men attain.
Would that the Kuwaitis had learned this lesson in the 1980's. They were wealthy, and ignored their poor brethren, who in turn turned on them and supported Saddam Hussein's invasion.
41 posted on 11/11/2007 4:52:32 PM PST by Hornitos
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To: Vision Thing

My federal taxes enrich those in DC. I doubt increasing DC’s wealth is in my interest.


42 posted on 11/11/2007 4:57:28 PM PST by VRWC For Truth (RINO cleaner - the backbone restorer)
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To: Vision Thing
(While people have differing amounts of money, they all have the same amount of time.)

Not really. When you have less money you also have less time because you can not afford to buy time savers. Everything takes a little longer when you have to do it the economy way.

43 posted on 11/11/2007 4:57:41 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (A good marriage is like a casserole, only those responsible for it really know what goes into it.)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

I agree. When people have more money, they can buy products and services that save them time. However, you may be taking this quote out of context. The author wrote it mainly to point out how regardless of income, people have the same amount of time for volunteer opportunities. It’s part of a larger argument he is trying to make: Namely, giving more results in higher incomes.


44 posted on 11/11/2007 5:18:53 PM PST by Vision Thing (hillary is unstable.)
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To: Disambiguator
God's laws apply in this situation, too. Governments don't benefit, because they're not really being charitable, plus they have to steal the money first.

Jesus said give unto "Caesar that which is Caesars" refering to taxes. He didn't seem to consider it stealing.

45 posted on 11/12/2007 3:36:57 AM PST by Jorge
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To: Vision Thing

sound analysis always winds up agreeing with God’s word.


46 posted on 11/12/2007 2:45:58 PM PST by the invisib1e hand (keep the heat on the hillary.)
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To: the invisib1e hand

Despite the author’s avoidance of any biblical references to giving, we all know where Humanity got the idea of giving in the first place.


47 posted on 11/12/2007 4:44:22 PM PST by Vision Thing (hillary is unstable.)
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To: Vision Thing

first paragraph gives some clues. sometimes you have to speak poetically — sometimes it’s the only way people will hear.


48 posted on 11/12/2007 6:11:27 PM PST by the invisib1e hand (keep the heat on the hillary.)
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To: Hornitos
They were wealthy, and ignored their poor brethren, who in turn turned on them and supported Saddam Hussein's invasion.

Those "poor brethren" were mostly Palestinians. When Kwuatis got their country back after the Gulf War, they deported most of them.

49 posted on 11/12/2007 8:54:30 PM PST by Tamar1973 (Riding the Korean Wave, one BYJ movie at a time! (http://www.byj.co.kr))
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To: Tamar1973
Yes, but the greater point is they were still the Kuwaiti's brethren in that they are all Muslims, and Islam enjoins charity. The same principle of dispersing while accumulating applies across borders or within borders and across nationalities.
50 posted on 11/12/2007 9:32:23 PM PST by Hornitos
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