Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Smoking out the facts (Giving up smoking can kill you)
The Ottawa Citizen ^ | Sunday, October 28, 2007 | David Warren,

Posted on 11/12/2007 6:51:35 AM PST by fanfan

According to three doctors at the KS Hegde Medical Academy in Mangalore, India, writing in the journal Medical Hypotheses, giving up smoking can kill you. Arunachalam Kumar, Kasaragod Mallya, and Jairaj Kumar were "struck by the more than casual relationship between the appearance of lung cancer and an abrupt and recent cessation of the smoking habit in many, if not most, cases."

In 182 of the 312 cases they had treated, an habitual smoker of at least a pack a day, for at least a quarter-century, had developed lung cancer shortly after he gave up smoking.

They surmised a biological mechanism protects smokers against cancer, which is strengthened by years of determined smoking. When the smoker quits, "a surge and spurt in re-activation of bodily healing and repair mechanisms of chronic smoke-damaged respiratory epithelia is induced and spurred by an abrupt discontinuation of habit," and "goes awry, triggering uncontrolled cell division and tumour genesis."

An evolutionary argument could support this hypothesis. Man is the only animal who cooks his food, and thousands of generations of our ancestors, pent up in smoke-filled caves, could easily account for this biological mechanism.

Since the findings of Kumar, Mallya, and Kumar coincide with my own medical hypothesis, based on my own anecdotal evidence, I hasten to embrace them. Several deceased friends and family, starting with my paternal grandfather, perished shortly after they quit smoking -- not only from lung cancer, but from other causes ranging from previously undiagnosed heart disease to industrial accident.

The same general principle would apply: that a body long accustomed to a (frankly addictive) substance, goes haywire when the substance is removed. In the good old days, people instinctively understood things like that, without the need for medical research. And it was inconceivable that, for instance, hospitals would prevent patients from smoking, who were already medically challenged on other fronts.

Other medical literature has documented other risks of non-smoking, that include neurotic depression, violent irritability, and obscene weight gain. But these tend to be discounted because they lead to death only indirectly.

Likewise, indirect evidence for the dangers of not smoking comes from the 150th anniversary number of Atlantic magazine. P.J. O'Rourke points to (actual, serious) U.S. historical statistics showing that, in the period 1973-94, annual per capita consumption of cigarettes fell from 4,148 to 2,493. In the same period, the incidence of lung and bronchial cancer rose from 42.5 to 57.1 cases per 100,000 population.

In the past I have flagged UN statistics showing that life expectancy was nicely proportional to tobacco consumption, internationally -- so that, for example, Japan and South Korea were respectively first and second in both life expectancy and tobacco consumption. The lowest tobacco consumption was in Third World countries, where we also found some of the shortest life expectancies.

I think we could also find historical statistics showing there is a reliable, worldwide relationship between rising tobacco consumption, and rising life expectancy, nation by nation, throughout the 19th and 20th centuries.

As Al Gore likes to say, "the science is irrefutable."

The weakness in that last statement being, that there is no such thing as irrefutable science. There is nothing in the whole history of science that is not tentative. And while, in astronomy, I remain convinced that the Earth revolves around the sun, I would not put all my money even on that proposition, but, given attractively long odds, reserve a penny bet on the sun going round the Earth.

If my reader is planning to give up smoking in the face of what I report, then courage to him, and I will avoid saying, "Go ahead, make my day." I am not in the pay of the tobacco lobby -- on the contrary, I seem to be paying them -- and am in principle indifferent to what substances others decide to use or abuse. My dander rises only when they try to interfere with my own freedom, through the childish, petty, and essentially totalitarian public campaigns against harmless smokers -- buttressed by scientific claims weaker than the above.

There is one more hypothesis with which I would like to leave my reader. It is that the kind of quack "science" that was used to ban smoking has now mutated into the kind that is used to flog global warming. It should have been resisted then; it should certainly be resisted now.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Extended News; Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; News/Current Events; Technical
KEYWORDS: addiction; cancer; cigarette; india; medical; medicine; puff; pufflist; smoking; taxes; tobacco
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-150151-178 next last

1 posted on 11/12/2007 6:51:36 AM PST by fanfan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: SheLion; Gabz

Ping.


2 posted on 11/12/2007 6:52:05 AM PST by fanfan ("We don't start fights my friends, but we finish them, and never leave until our work is done."PMSH)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: fanfan

bump for later


3 posted on 11/12/2007 6:54:16 AM PST by joe fonebone (When in danger, when in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: fanfan; neverdem

Thanks for posting, had a friend who gave up smoking and ten years later died of lung cancer.


4 posted on 11/12/2007 6:54:45 AM PST by sweetiepiezer (Duncan Hunter .....................a man of his word.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sweetiepiezer

Your welcome.
Sorry about your loss.


5 posted on 11/12/2007 6:58:23 AM PST by fanfan ("We don't start fights my friends, but we finish them, and never leave until our work is done."PMSH)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: cgk

Ping.


6 posted on 11/12/2007 6:59:22 AM PST by WhistlingPastTheGraveyard (I don't think she understood at all what I was saying. -- Anita Esterday on Hillary Clinton)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: fanfan
"U.S. historical statistics showing that, in the period 1973-94, annual per capita consumption of cigarettes fell from 4,148 to 2,493. In the same period, the incidence of lung and bronchial cancer rose from 42.5 to 57.1 cases per 100,000 population"

Maybe the increase in lung cancer directly correlates to increases in TAXES, and an ambulance-chaser ought to jump up and SUE THE CRAP OUT OF THOSE WHO RAISED THE TAXES!

If you look at the period covered, I'm sure that taxes increased in direct correlation to lung cancer increases, and you can use statistics to prove ANY point....just ask your accountant!

7 posted on 11/12/2007 7:00:43 AM PST by traditional1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sweetiepiezer

My father quit smoking, after 40+ years and numerous unsuccessful attempts, only to die less than 3 years later of lung cancer.


8 posted on 11/12/2007 7:01:20 AM PST by Trailerpark Badass (Don't taze me, bro!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: fanfan
Cigarettes and whiskey and wild, wild women.
Make you healthy, wealthy and wise.

Or have I mixed up quotes?:)

9 posted on 11/12/2007 7:02:32 AM PST by HuntsvilleTxVeteran (Remember the Alamo, Goliad and WACO, It is Time for a new San Jacinto)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: fanfan

The “smokers paradox” saved my life. Smoking causes a constriction of the arteries. If a smoker has a blockage in an artery, smoking may bring on chest pains while the artery is still open enough to sustain heart muscle. A non-smoker doesn’t get that advantage. By the time they start feeling chest pains, it may be a fatal level of blockage.

One of those odd things.


10 posted on 11/12/2007 7:02:58 AM PST by Glenn (Free Venezuela!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: fanfan
That's all I needed to hear!

Yeah, I know, it's junkie rationalization.

11 posted on 11/12/2007 7:04:21 AM PST by SouthTexas
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: fanfan

If true, I imagine this or any study proving the relationship will get spiked. Imagine if it ever came out that quitting smooking was hazerdous to your health.

I think Petet Jennings quite smoking and died of Lung cancer 2-3 yers later.


12 posted on 11/12/2007 7:04:50 AM PST by 1Old Pro
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sweetiepiezer

“Thanks for posting, had a friend who gave up smoking and ten years later died of lung cancer.”

My friend’s dad as well. The wife finally got him to quit. 9 years later he was dead of lung cancer.

A judge I knew in my hometown was diagnosed with heart disease in his late 50’s. He hadn’t smoked since he was 30 but the doc still attributed it to smoking. Crazy.


13 posted on 11/12/2007 7:06:14 AM PST by L98Fiero (A fool who'll waste his life, God rest his guts.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: fanfan
Hmmmm...I don't know if I'm buying this or not.

Have had an uncle who died of lung cancer 30 years after he stopped smoking.

And, a cousin who was still an active smoker when he got lung cancer.

And, then there's good ole Aunt Aggie who lived to her 90's and smoked her entire life and never got lung cancer.

I think it's in the genes.

14 posted on 11/12/2007 7:07:46 AM PST by moondoggie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Trailerpark Badass
My father quit smoking, after 40+ years and numerous unsuccessful attempts, only to die less than 3 years later of lung cancer.

My neighbor gave up smoking a couple of years ago. Smoked unfiltered, 2 packs a day for fifty years. Last March, was diagnosed with lung cancer, and was buried in June.

These anecdotes are not science nor are they statistics, but still make one wonder....

15 posted on 11/12/2007 7:08:30 AM PST by Gorzaloon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Trailerpark Badass

My stepmother quit smoking at age 72, now has a severe case of reactive airway disease (similar to asthma).


16 posted on 11/12/2007 7:08:36 AM PST by Judith Anne (Thank you St. Jude for favors granted.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: fanfan; Just another Joe; CSM; lockjaw02; Publius6961; elkfersupper; nopardons; metesky; Mears; ...

Nanny State Ping.

I agree with the author about smoker bans being enacted on even shakier grounds.


17 posted on 11/12/2007 7:08:53 AM PST by Gabz (Don't tell my mom I'm a lobbyist, she thinks I'm a piano player in a whorehouse)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Trailerpark Badass

I quit smoking for thirty days once upon a time...about thirty years ago. I’ve been considering quitting again recently as I have been puffing for forty-seven years, and thinking I’m pushing my luck. I feel real good, no problems, but peer advice has been relentless that I should quit.

Now I’m wondering.


18 posted on 11/12/2007 7:11:24 AM PST by rockinqsranch (Dems, Libs, Socialists...call 'em what you will...They ALL have fairies livin' in their trees.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Gabz

Thanks Gabz.

I have to go out for a while.

BB soon.


19 posted on 11/12/2007 7:12:23 AM PST by fanfan ("We don't start fights my friends, but we finish them, and never leave until our work is done."PMSH)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: moondoggie

I think it’s genetic, too. However, it will be taxed and regulated by law, regardless.


20 posted on 11/12/2007 7:12:52 AM PST by Judith Anne (Thank you St. Jude for favors granted.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: fanfan

I wonder if giving up chocolate is equally dangerous?


21 posted on 11/12/2007 7:15:17 AM PST by AZLiberty (President Fred -- I like the sound of it.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: fanfan

I will remain a non-smoker (never having smoked a day in my life) for the remainder of my life, thank you...;-)


22 posted on 11/12/2007 7:15:26 AM PST by EnigmaticAnomaly (Grassroots Conservatism at its finest...VOTE DUNCAN HUNTER 2008)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: rockinqsranch
I quit smoking for thirty days once upon a time...about thirty years ago. I’ve been considering quitting again recently as I have been puffing for forty-seven years, and thinking I’m pushing my luck. I feel real good, no problems, but peer advice has been relentless that I should quit. Now I’m wondering.

FWIW, I am staying quit regardless just to spite the tax collectors. Some people say they would rather die than pay more taxes. OK, I mean it. :-)

Seriously, the risk was taken when I started ages ago. It was my decision, I take responsibility. If that does not get me, something else will, but for now, I do feel better without them, honestly. Yes, I miss them. I miss the '60's also. Neither are coming back.

23 posted on 11/12/2007 7:16:44 AM PST by Gorzaloon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: fanfan

For years I’ve said this and usually received good arguments why I was wrong and in some discussions insane,,,, as I buried friends who had recently quit.

Thanks for posting this, right or wrong, I need to forward this article! :-)


24 posted on 11/12/2007 7:19:23 AM PST by JoeSixPack1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Glenn

“smoking may bring on chest pains while the artery is still open enough to sustain heart muscle. “

Aint that the truth - I know two people with the same thing.


25 posted on 11/12/2007 7:19:56 AM PST by spanalot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: fanfan
" In the good old days, people instinctively understood things like that, without the need for... research."

Such as that the Earth was flat, and that the sun, moon and stars revolved around the Earth...

26 posted on 11/12/2007 7:20:23 AM PST by Redbob (WWJBD - "What Would Jack Bauer Do?")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: fanfan

lET ME ADD THAT A STUDY OF URanium miners found that those that did not smoke had the highest incidence of lung cancer - and those that smoked less than 10 a day had the lowest incidence.


27 posted on 11/12/2007 7:22:03 AM PST by spanalot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sweetiepiezer

I see lots of “quit then got lung cancer” -

but my friend’s dad quit, cold turkey, then had a heart attack and died the following week.

Strange.


28 posted on 11/12/2007 7:22:39 AM PST by MrB (You can't reason people out of a position that they didn't use reason to get into in the first place)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: HuntsvilleTxVeteran

No, you got it right. I’ve practiced that particular wisdom for 45 years now and am in better health than most of my contemporaries. Fact.

I’ve come to believe seriously that most medical “studies” are horse manure designed to increase, not decrease, the numbers of patients for the croakers. Remember “don’t eat butter, eat margarine.”? They dispense advice that kills people and never even act the least bit apologetic when later demonstrated to be wrong.


29 posted on 11/12/2007 7:24:43 AM PST by Seruzawa (Attila the Hun... wasn't he a liberal?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: fanfan
An evolutionary argument could support this hypothesis. Man is the only animal who cooks his food, and thousands of generations of our ancestors, pent up in smoke-filled caves, could easily account for this biological mechanism.

They must not have had carbon monoxide detectors.

30 posted on 11/12/2007 7:28:18 AM PST by Moonman62 (The issue of whether cheap labor makes America great should have been settled by the Civil War.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 1Old Pro

” smooking was hazerdous”
I’ve tried to quit smooking, but I can’t!


31 posted on 11/12/2007 7:28:48 AM PST by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ("Don't touch that thing")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra
I’ve tried to quit smooking, but I can’t!

Keep trying, it will make a hugh difference to your health.

32 posted on 11/12/2007 7:31:03 AM PST by 1Old Pro
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: 1Old Pro
I think Petet Jennings quite smoking and died of Lung cancer 2-3 yers later.

Peter Jennings resumed chain smoking after the 09/11 attacks.

33 posted on 11/12/2007 7:31:11 AM PST by Moonman62 (The issue of whether cheap labor makes America great should have been settled by the Civil War.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Trailerpark Badass
I think after 40 years of smoking that the damage was done, the seeds of cancer had been sown. I doubt if it would have mattered, he would have developed cancer in 3 years anyway. I don’t see how continuing to smoke would have protected him.

The same thing happened to my mother in law 5 years after quiting smoking unfiltered Camels for 40 years. My mother’s stroke put and end to her smoking and my father’s COPD stopped his smoking and his breathing. I could go on and on until I came to that one great uncle of mine who continued to burn holes in the couch until he fell over dead in his 90’s.

34 posted on 11/12/2007 7:32:38 AM PST by Ditter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: fanfan
P.J. O'Rourke points to (actual, serious) U.S. historical statistics

As Al Gore likes to say, "the science is irrefutable."

Is this from Scrappleface?

35 posted on 11/12/2007 7:32:59 AM PST by Moonman62 (The issue of whether cheap labor makes America great should have been settled by the Civil War.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Moonman62
Peter Jennings resumed chain smoking after the 09/11 attacks

And got his cancer in the months afterwards, coincidence?

36 posted on 11/12/2007 7:33:11 AM PST by 1Old Pro
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: MrB

Maybe the stress of quitting smoking helped. A friend’s 90 something grandmother quit smoking and died two weeks later,they felt of the stress of quitting.


37 posted on 11/12/2007 7:33:23 AM PST by libbylu (Mitt 2008)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: 1Old Pro

But smookin’ is one of my life’s simple pleasures!
However, I’m tryin’ to quit smokin!


38 posted on 11/12/2007 7:34:56 AM PST by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ("Don't touch that thing")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: L98Fiero

I typed for a pulmonary doc, and that’s what they do for their stats, 30 year agos spent a week with a smoker, good enough reason to blame smoking.


39 posted on 11/12/2007 7:35:02 AM PST by libbylu (Mitt 2008)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Seruzawa

As an example to others, and not that I care for moderation myself,
it has always been my rule never to smoke when asleep
and never to refrain when awake.

- 70th birthday speech
MARK TWAIN


40 posted on 11/12/2007 7:36:10 AM PST by HuntsvilleTxVeteran (Remember the Alamo, Goliad and WACO, It is Time for a new San Jacinto)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: fanfan

Everyone I know who has emphysema smoked. No thanks.


41 posted on 11/12/2007 7:36:17 AM PST by metmom (Welfare was never meant to be a career choice.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: fanfan

Maybe. We all know smokers to whom this happened. My own father-in-law was one. But they probably would have gotten cancer had they kept on smoking, too. In other words, by the time you have been smoking for forty years, the damage to your cells is done. But quitting might repair the damage to your circulatory system.


42 posted on 11/12/2007 7:37:24 AM PST by Fairview ( Everybody is somebody else's weirdo.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Moonman62
“Peter Jennings resumed chain smoking after the 09/11 attacks.”

I tried to smoke chains but how do you keep them lit?

Brother Dave Gardner

43 posted on 11/12/2007 7:39:36 AM PST by HuntsvilleTxVeteran (Remember the Alamo, Goliad and WACO, It is Time for a new San Jacinto)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: fanfan
An evolutionary argument could support this hypothesis. Man is the only animal who cooks his food, and thousands of generations of our ancestors, pent up in smoke-filled caves, could easily account for this biological mechanism

HAHAHAHAHAHAH yes, because you know, cooked flesh and burned wood is the same as nicotine, tar, and all the other goodies added to shredded tobacco leaf in a cigarette.

44 posted on 11/12/2007 7:40:17 AM PST by HamiltonJay
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: moondoggie
I think it's in the genes.

My allergist/asthma specialist said much the same thing. If you have a tendency towards lung problems, like asthma and allergies, then smoking will do you in. If you don't, it won't, and that explains why some people smoke and get emphysema and such, and why some live till their nineties.

45 posted on 11/12/2007 7:40:26 AM PST by metmom (Welfare was never meant to be a career choice.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: fanfan

I’m stunned.

I have personally believed this for years but who the hell is going to believe you when you say this? It was one reason I refused to quit for so long.

But I did quit two years ago. Still have my fingers crossed.


46 posted on 11/12/2007 7:40:58 AM PST by VeniVidiVici (No buy China!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Gorzaloon

And hundreds of thousands of others developed lung cancer and died while never stopping smoking at all.

You don’t abuse your body for decades and think it’ll have no impact.


47 posted on 11/12/2007 7:41:18 AM PST by HamiltonJay
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Glenn; spanalot

My b-i-l has smoked two packs a day for forty years, had a heart attack and developed emphysema before fifty while still smoking.


48 posted on 11/12/2007 7:43:01 AM PST by metmom (Welfare was never meant to be a career choice.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: fanfan

Maybe my dad’s an exception...but he quit smoking at 40 and is now
staring down his 80th birthday in a couple of weeks.
His only health complaint is some dermatological problems (maybe
brought on by his 44 years in the petrochemical lab? Or just his
bad luck?)


49 posted on 11/12/2007 7:47:27 AM PST by VOA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: metmom
had a heart attack and developed emphysema

I would never argue that smoking is a "good thing". I was just saying...

50 posted on 11/12/2007 7:49:31 AM PST by Glenn (Free Venezuela!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-150151-178 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson