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The swift boating of the English language
Jewish World Review ^ | Nov. 23, 2007 | Dave Weinbaum

Posted on 11/23/2007 4:02:48 AM PST by rhema

You're a swiftboater, I'm a swiftboater, everybody's a swiftboater. The all encompassing phrase for any political zapping; real, potential, or imagined, has been funneled into one label, swiftboating. No longer used much as a noun, this verb has become overused to the point of triteness and acceptance as appropriate English.

Language is the child of overused slang

Ain't that the low-down!?

For the record a review of who and what actual swift boaters stood for is in order.

They took umbrage when fellow swiftie, Senator Kerry, decided he was going to run for president as a gung ho war hero. Kerry based this premise on his four month tour in Vietnam as a junior Lieutenant. You remember his response as the presidential nominee at the 2004 Democratic Convention, "John Kerry, reporting for duty", while saluting the cheering throngs.

Quoting from their website www.swiftvets.com/, "Swift Vets and POWS for Truth has been formed to counter the false "war crimes" charges John Kerry repeatedly made against Vietnam veterans who served in our units and elsewhere and to accurately portray Kerry's brief tour in Vietnam."

They wrote "Unfit for Command" to truly depict that history. Many think it cost Senator Kerry the presidential election.

Of course the real reason Kerry lost was his incompetence at politically handling the accurate accusations of the Swifties.

Ex-Senator Democrat Bob Kerrey of Nebraska advised John Kerry to fess up to mistakes as a young and zealous man and apologize to the veterans he had so blithely libeled. If Kerry had fessed up, we'd be calling him Mr. President and dealing with his reelection. His honor wasn't besmirched as much as his dishonor was revealed.

(Excerpt) Read more at jewishworldreview.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: kerry; swiftboat; unfitforcommand

1 posted on 11/23/2007 4:02:50 AM PST by rhema
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To: rhema

This is an example too of terminology being over used and the meaning change too. Bill Clinton calls any criticism of Hillary swift boating. Bill Clinton calls any questioning of Hillary’s statements swift boating. Even if someone simply doesn’t understand what Hillary says, and wants clarification of where she stands, he calls that swift boating. So the terminology can start to lose its meaning if it is used to describe situations beyond the original meaning.


2 posted on 11/23/2007 4:06:19 AM PST by Dilbert San Diego
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To: rhema

“Swiftboating” also known as “vicious truthing” or relaying negative facts.


3 posted on 11/23/2007 4:09:47 AM PST by 2ndDivisionVet (Your "dirt" on Fred is about as persuasive as a Nancy Pelosi Veteran's Day Speech)
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To: Dilbert San Diego

It depends upon what ‘it’ is. Remember?

Lefties always want to control language. Language is a tool and is not to be in control of the masses. Only an elite will talk to each other, in their own special language. For example, the Catholic Church and it’s long term use of dead Latin, and not allowing peons to read the Bible.


4 posted on 11/23/2007 4:17:03 AM PST by Leisler (RNC, RINO National Committee. Always was, always will be.)
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To: Dilbert San Diego
"This is an example too of terminology being over used and the meaning change"

Oh. Sort of like "neocon".

5 posted on 11/23/2007 4:18:03 AM PST by Past Your Eyes (Some people are too stupid to be ashamed.)
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To: rhema

RE: JF’nK

“His honor wasn’t besmirched as much as his dishonor was revealed.”

Good line!


6 posted on 11/23/2007 4:19:27 AM PST by headsonpikes (Genocide is the highest sacrament of socialism.)
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To: rhema
"I went to a silent auction, but a mime got all the good stuff."
ROFLMAO! Sounds like a Steven Wright one-liner.
7 posted on 11/23/2007 4:27:45 AM PST by Past Your Eyes (Some people are too stupid to be ashamed.)
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To: rhema
swiftboating ... this verb has become overused to the point of triteness..."

Yes overused by the Clintons, John Kerry and others thus making anything the complain about --> trite and irritating.

8 posted on 11/23/2007 4:31:43 AM PST by xtinct (I was the next door neighbor kid's imaginary friend.)
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To: xtinct

Yes overused by the Clintons, John Kerry and others thus making anything the complain about —> trite and irritating.

how about...getting a lewinsky....another clintonism injected into the american lexicon!!!


9 posted on 11/23/2007 4:47:21 AM PST by nyyankeefan
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To: Leisler; BlackElk
For example, the Catholic Church and it’s long term use of dead Latin, and not allowing peons to read the Bible.

That was an ignorant statement. In medieval times, if you could read, you could read Latin. Latin was not a "dead" language. Even after the Protestant revolt, secular writers like Descartes wrote his works in Latin after he wrote in French so that more people could read it (and French was a pretty common language). Latin is superior to other romance languages in precision. The Latin language was not dead, but the word meanings were fixed. English has changed so much since the KJV that a merely literate person would get the wrong idea from the usage of words like "prevent," (cf. OED) which has changed to mean its opposite over the years. Many of the vulgar translations into local languages contained egregious errors. The monks of the Catholic church preserved the Bible, as Catholic monks and scribes made the copies in extant Greek and Hebrew, and the Latin.

The reason the Bibles were chained in the churches was because they were hand-copied and therefore priceless. Mass duplication before the printing press was impossible.

This is one heck of a thread to make offensive and inaccurate comparisons. We Catholics on FR avoid doing the same because we are going to have to work together on a common cause. There are better times and places to discuss these things.

You would best avoid making these sorts of statements, which are repeated even more frequently by the secular liberals, on this site, especially on these types of topics where it is completely unnecessary.
10 posted on 11/23/2007 5:35:43 AM PST by Dr. Sivana (Not a newbie, I just wanted a new screen name.)
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To: Dr. Sivana
That was an example, of a people at a place and time. Since we are talking about human and institutional behavior, then logically someone, and some institution would have to maligned. I could of talked about the Borgia's, and any of the first twenty or so Popes.

When able, the Catholic church set itself up as an organ of mass control, and like the Soviet Communist Party, it was all for the good. The fashions of the church, and in the party, wax and wane like any institutional power structure. Your experience might differ. Past experience is no guarantee of future experience. Check your warranty. Seek legal council in case of fraud.

11 posted on 11/23/2007 6:17:24 AM PST by Leisler (RNC, RINO National Committee. Always was, always will be.)
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To: Leisler; BlackElk
You did not refute my statement, because you couldn't. 1. Latin was not a "dead" language in the Middle Ages. 2. The Church did not keep the Bible in Latin to keep it from regular people. At that time, if you could read, you could read Latin. 3. The Church was singularly responsible (as an earthly agent, since ultimately God is responsible) for the preservation of the Bible because there were no printing presses, and it was a VERY time consuming task to make good copies. 4. You picked your example, and it was ignorant. While individual popes and bishops, being men, certainly were not impeccable, simply stating that the Catholic Church "set itself up as an organ of mass control, and like the Soviet Communist Party, it was all for the good." To compare the Church, which ceded plenty of temporal powers to kings and princes, with the Godless Soviet Union is babble. You then make a blanket statement about "institutional power structures," which would make the analogy apply to everything from the Chinese Communist Party to the U.S.'s own Constitution, to Habitat for Humanity and the Boy Scouts.

I could of talked about the Borgia's, and any of the first twenty or so Popes.

They were mostly martyred by the Roman Empire up until Liberius in about the 4th Century. While they were trying to stomp out heresy (especially Arianism and Gnosticism), they could hardly be compared to the Soviet Empire or the modern leftist apparatus.

If you want to talk about someone seizing absolute control, a man like Henry VIII who wanted to be head of both Church AND State would be a more likely example.
12 posted on 11/23/2007 8:29:29 AM PST by Dr. Sivana (Not a newbie, I just wanted a new screen name.)
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To: rhema

Interesting how meanings change. Swiftboating should (if defined by the original scenario) mean “sinking someone with the truth”, but Bill Clinton uses it with the implication that the sinking is done with lies...which would be better described as “Borking”. By using “swiftboating” Bill Clinton hopes to both deflect the attacks on his missus and defame the original swiftboat group.


13 posted on 11/23/2007 8:33:02 AM PST by blues-train (blues train)
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To: rhema

The English language is being trivialized by people who have never been taught its proper usage in school and that includes most recent university graduates! All one need do is read some of the letters written by soldiers both Union and Confederate to see what has been lost. I constantly shake my head in amazement at those who don’t know the difference between their, there and they’re for instance. If you see something written which is not totally riddled with errors the writer is usually over forty years old. The worst part is that most don’t seem to care. Even some of the posts on Free Republic are so carelessly thrown together that I don’t even attempt to decipher what the writer meant to say, if anything. It is no wonder that we elect people who swear to uphold the Constitution and then immediately set about destroying the Constitution. What else can you expect when language no longer has any meaning?


14 posted on 11/23/2007 8:44:47 AM PST by RipSawyer (Does anyone still believe this is a free country?)
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To: rhema

John Kerry is the one who slandered his fellow soldiers, not the other way round. I am completely disgusted by these self serving revisions of history the left keeps pushing.


15 posted on 11/23/2007 8:55:40 AM PST by AndyTheBear (Disastrous social experimentation is the opiate of elitist snobs.)
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To: Dr. Sivana
"...Latin was not a "dead" language ..."

Ah, yeah. That was implied it was in use, that the elite were, in fact using it, albeit a percent of a percent of the population.

" The Church did not keep the Bible in Latin to keep it from regular people. At that time, if you could read, you could read Latin."

I doubt that. I suspect the vast majority of all the European people that could read, only a minority could read Latin.

" The Church was singularly responsible (as an earthly agent, since ultimately God is responsible) for the preservation of the Bible because there were no printing presses, and it was a VERY time consuming task to make good copies. "

People had plenty of time. There wasn't much to do, except onerous and time eating ceremonies, taxes to the church and slave away at ornate and useless temple buildings. Keep the peasants busy type stuff. Matter of fact, to copy it wouldn't even be required to be able to read Latin.

"..compare the Church, which ceded plenty of temporal powers to kings and princes, with the Godless Soviet Union is babble. You then make a blanket statement about "institutional power structures," which would make the analogy apply to everything from the Chinese Communist Party to the U.S.'s own Constitution, to Habitat for Humanity and the Boy Scouts. "

Correct. And if babble, what are you responding for? Don't you know enough not to argue with street people or the Internet equivalent?

"If you want to talk about someone seizing absolute control, a man like Henry VIII who wanted to be head of both Church AND State would be a more likely example."

I agree. Variation on theme.

16 posted on 11/23/2007 9:06:36 AM PST by Leisler (RNC, RINO National Committee. Always was, always will be.)
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To: Leisler; Dr. Sivana; ArrogantBustard; ninenot; AnAmericanMother; Convert from ECUSA; Tax-chick
Leisler: Whatever you may fantasize, it was not required that you target the Roman Catholic Church with your spigot of bigotry in order to respond to a thread about "swift boating" (which is in reality the targeting of phonies like Traitor John Kerry with the truth that refutes his steady stream of lies. In the same spirit of refutation, the following:

Whatever you may imagine, Latin was the language of the educated and literate minority of medieval Europe. What on earth leads you to imagine either that there was a literate majority of the general European populace in those days or that a majority of the much more limited number of literate people would be at all likely to be illiterate in Latin???

Instead of having scads of free time, the population of medieval Europe was busy at an agriculture of personal survival (no tractors, no plows of a modern sort, no variety of fertilizers, no crop rotation to speak of, and, as the partially admired Dr. Crichton might inform you, very little of the scientific achievements that modern farmers take for granted, etc.), stitching for survival their own clothing since the New York garment district and capitalism were yet to come, gathering fuel wood and peat to keep the home fires burning against the dread of winter for personal survival and food cooking for survival and to bring out the best in what food was available (OPEC and Islamofascist extortion being yet to come).... Well, even you get the picture although you may not admit it.

From the picture on your home page, you may be imagining that medieval peasants lived a life of relative leisure just because that may be the state of the modern peasantry, but it was not so. At least your dog looks like an admirable pooch.

Mrs. Elk, the Latin teacher, sends her greetings to you: Saepe ignorami stultitia credunt.

I would observe that: e pluribus unum; and vox populi, vox Dei; and unitate, finitima libertati carissime! and extra ecclesiam nulla salus and cave Graecis dona ferens and semper fideles! Dr. Sivana or others may wish to add a few from his, her and/or their own repertoire(s).

There are those who seem to believe that God sent the reformation to spread the Bible and that Gutenberg and his printing press arose as a result, rather than that Gutenberg invented movable type and the printing press and a proliferation of bibles ensued (Catholic and otherwise).

Although I am Catholic, I have always had a preference for the King James Version as rendered by the scholars working at the behest of the actual King James because the translation seems to convey the majesty of the "voice" of God. It is a work of art as well as of faith. Any doctrinal differences between the KJV and the Douay Rheims are, of course, resolved in favor of the authoritative Douay Rheims but KJV is a magnificent achievement of men dedicated to their work. Either translation is likely to inspire men to other works of art such as ornate buildings dedicated to the worship of the One True God, but you knew that!

Thanks for playing anyhow!

17 posted on 11/23/2007 12:30:34 PM PST by BlackElk (Dean of Discipline of the Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club)
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To: BlackElk

I just gave James a piece of bread with butter and told him it was “proto-toast.” Now Pat’s explaining it to him - with many, many words, rather like yourself - but I expect James to knock Pat down once he’s done chewing.

My point is that, if one is going to use dead languages, one needs to be Bigger.


18 posted on 11/23/2007 12:45:28 PM PST by Tax-chick (Every committee wants to take over the world.)
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To: Dr. Sivana
Although I do not claim to be a scholar of history, I do believe that the Bible was written in Latin, partly because it was the language of the Church, and partly because of the side effect of keeping it away from the common folk. If the Bible could not be read by the commoners, then human interpretations and possible errors could not be protested. It took a scholar-monk to stand up to the church and the erroneous practices being flouted by the papacy and clerical hierarchy.

It was not until the 1500's when the first Bible was translated in a common language by Martin Luther (although he translated from the Greek, not Latin.) I think it is telling that it took so long for someone to grasp the importance of placing God's words into the hands of the people so that an intercessor was no longer needed for one's spiritual journey.

19 posted on 11/23/2007 12:57:04 PM PST by SoftballMominVA (Never wrestle with a pig; he wants to get dirty anyway.)
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To: Dilbert San Diego
the terminology can start to lose its meaning if it is used to describe situations beyond the original meaning.

Not at all. It acquires new meanings and becomes more powerful. Eventually it will aquire all meanings and all conversation will consist of just that one word.

20 posted on 11/23/2007 1:00:36 PM PST by RightWhale (anti-razors are pro-life)
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To: rhema
The best analogous term is "McCarthyism".

We now know beyond any shadow of a doubt (Verona papers, M. Stanton Evans research, etc.) that Joe McCarthy accurately identified Communists in the US government bureaucracy based on sources in the FBI.

The left, however, uses that term as a synonym for "libel" or "false charges".

Every time they do that they practice their own version of "McCarthyism", libeling a good man with false charges.

That is one reason why it is so important for parents to make the sacrifice to home school their kids. Historical truths need to be passed on from generation to generation even if the educational establishment insists on myth-making and lying.
21 posted on 11/23/2007 1:04:23 PM PST by cgbg (The fight has just begun against the bully (nanny) state.)
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To: RightWhale

Dude! Dude? Don’t dude me, dude.


22 posted on 11/23/2007 1:08:44 PM PST by Old Professer (The critic writes with rapier pen, dips it twice, and writes again.)
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To: BlackElk
All dew eyed romanticism aside, at the first opportunity, at least half of the people most intimate with the loving embrace of the Catholic Church, couldn’t fight and kill fast enough to get out of it’s sclerotic clutches, ingrates that they were.

The peasants had enough time to build the estates, countless building and temples for the worldly desires of the Church and it's State partners. Not to mention the taxes and guild rackets and payola of the incestuous economies.

I suppose the Church never murdered scholars, nor suppressed free learning, nor supported the State over countless peasant revolts over age old grievances of taxes and liberty. All imagined.

23 posted on 11/23/2007 1:12:26 PM PST by Leisler (RNC, RINO National Committee. Always was, always will be.)
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To: Leisler; Dr. Sivana; Tax-chick
Also: Ab illo benedicaris in Cujo nomine cremaberis!

You might want to read Nicholas Sandler's book on the "reformation" (it would be an injustice even to Luther to call Henry VIII or Lizzie I "reformers") in England. The manuscript received a few finishing touches after he was martyred under Henry. You may obtain a copy by communicating with TAN Books and Publishers of Rockford, IL. They have another by a Congregationalist member of Parliament (Cobbett?) of the early 19th century called A History of the Reformation in England and Ireland. Each explains how the Catholic Church provided education and medical care without cost to the commoners of England and Ireland, supporting the costs of doctors, hospitals and schools and teachers solely from the earnings of their lands and estates, that Henry stripped them of their lands and estates and the result was the first crown taxes on the commoners.

Luther, ended his career, denouncing peasant revolts against those obles supporting him (see the American Lutheran Church produced film on Luther starring Stacy Keach as Luther).

The Church never murdered scholars. It submitted some to the judgment of the Inquisition. Some of those were executed by the state in a system called Christendom which you evidently do not understand. Sometimes the inquisition was even wrong (as in the judgment against St. Joan of Arc who seems to have been adjudged guilty more for her French nationalism against the Burgundians and Brits than any heresy) or actually run by erroneous sinners in some cases. At its worst, however, the inquisition was far superior, morally and intellectually, to those "enlightened" folks who think they know better than to believe in God.

What the peasants built as cathedrals was their business and none of yours. What is "free learning?" Apparently the celebration of ignorance and error as viewed by the enemies of the Church and its Founder and Guarantor. License is not liberty. Sclerotic clutches???? We have turned the spadesful of earth over on the coffins of our enemies for nearly 20 centuries (the Roman Empire among them) and will continue to do so to the end. It is guaranteed.

As to supporting the state, we have supported the American state against the soviets and against our ancient Islamic enemy. Most states are quite transitory. When they go away, we find other allies.

One soul allowed to go to hell through negligence in the persecution of the enemies of that soul's salvation is infinitely more tragic than any judicial inquiry leading to the speeding up of the physical demise of those persistent malefactors who would tempt that soul to perdition.

As to the crack about the "worldly desires of the Church and its State partners," your materialist jealousy is showing as well as your bigotry.

As Ludwig von Mises, one of the 20th century's best minds, observed to Ayn Rand in 1961: "So, you are the silly woman who thinks that you can be free without God!....."

24 posted on 11/24/2007 2:06:35 PM PST by BlackElk (Dean of Discipline of the Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club)
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To: BlackElk

Umba gumba.


25 posted on 11/24/2007 2:11:46 PM PST by Leisler (RNC, RINO National Committee. Always was, always will be.)
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To: rhema


It's "swift-boating" only if it's true... in which case, it's fair.

.


26 posted on 11/24/2007 2:29:35 PM PST by OESY
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To: rhema; All

The Latin language is not ‘dead’. A dead language is one that no new words are added to it. The Pope has a secretary whose job is to add words to the Latin language. E.G. Vehiculens movens sese for car. Idiom, yes, but new words nonetheless.

The English language is beautiful because you can take a noun and turn it into a gerund, much like the ‘swift-boating’ or my favorite, since I am a high school Latin teacher: ‘texting’. Go back and find a good 1900 era unabridged dictionary, and see just how many words we take for granted are now in the language/lexicon.

Oh, and for those who are wondering about the Scriptures: the Vulgate Bible was called that because the Latin word for ‘common’ and ‘ordinary’ is vulgus. The ‘common’ Bible was the Vulgate because it didn’t matter if your native language was French, Italian, German, etc. You could read the Bible in the Vulgate.

Speaking of Vulgates, anyone have a spare Pre-Clementine Vulgate lying around that I could have?;)


27 posted on 11/24/2007 4:05:24 PM PST by shag377 (De gustibus non disputandum est)
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To: shag377

Latin lives! Cicero would not be surprised.


28 posted on 11/24/2007 4:07:57 PM PST by RightWhale (anti-razors are pro-life)
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