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Found In Farmer's Field: The 2,000-Year-Old Skeleton Of The Lost Lady Of Rome
Daily Mail ^ | 11-23-2007 | Chris Brooke

Posted on 11/23/2007 7:32:17 AM PST by blam

Found in a farmer's field: The 2,000-year-old skeleton of the lost lady of Rome

By CHRIS BROOKE
Last updated at 09:14am on 23rd November 2007

In her lifetime she was a member of a wealthy family based in a bustling British outpost of the world's mightiest empire.

The imperial glory has long faded. But, almost 2,000 years on, archaeologists have discovered a corner of an English field that is forever Rome. They have unearthed a coffin containing a remarkably well-preserved skeleton in the village of Aldborough, near Boroughbridge, North Yorkshire - once the site of a major Roman town, Isurium Brigantium.

The archaeologists, conducting a two-week excavation project, were searching for Roman artefacts with a metal detector when they found the 6ft lead coffin inside a stone chamber only 12in below the surface of a barley field.

'Exciting find': the 2,000-year-old lead coffin and skeleton are examined by Mags Felter of the York Archaeological Trust

The skeleton is believed to date from between the 2nd and 4th centuries, and is largely intact. It is over 5ft long and even has a full set of teeth. Experts have yet to scientifically age or sex the remains, but are confident it is a woman from a well-to-do family - her status reflected in the expensive coffin.

Analysis of the skeleton may yield fascinating information about her lifestyle and diet.

The expensive lead coffin signifies the person buried was of high status

Isurium was an important garrison which evolved into a prosperous imperial outpost complete with baths and a temple. The excavation was carried out by the York Archaeological Trust with funding from English Heritage.

A JCB digger was used to extract the half-ton coffin from the field.

Ian Panter, the trust's principal conservator, said:

"I've only ever worked on one other Roman lead coffin burial and that was from the South of England 20 years ago, so this is a really exciting find."

Yesterday, the British Museum revealed an extraordinary 58,290 archaeological objects had been unearthed by members of the public in the last year.

More than three quarters of them were found using metal detectors.

An Iron Age comb was recently discovered using this method by Russell Peach, a groundsman from Worcestershire.

Groundsman Russell Peach discovered this Iron Age comb using a metal detector

The copper alloy comb, which dates from AD25 to AD75 is thought to have been used for horses and has been described by the British Museum as a "phenomenal thing".

The museum encourages the portable antiquities scheme, a voluntary code to encourage metal detector owners in England and Wales to report finds to local museums.

The scheme is so successful that as many 300,000 finds were reported in its first decade.

A Roman horse and rider, discovered in Cambridgeshire


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: ancientautopsies; archaeology; deadmenspennies; desecration; farmer; finderskeepers; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; graverobbers; lady; roman; romanempire; skeleton

1 posted on 11/23/2007 7:32:19 AM PST by blam
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To: SunkenCiv

GGG Ping.


2 posted on 11/23/2007 7:32:41 AM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: blam
Remarkable. And that comb is a thing of beauty.

Nice find.
3 posted on 11/23/2007 7:34:35 AM PST by reagan_fanatic (Ron Paul put the cuckoo in my Cocoa Puffs)
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To: blam
Enthusiast unearths Iron Age comb

11-23-2007
BBC

A 2,000-year-old Iron Age comb unearthed in Warwickshire is one of nearly 60,000 archaeological finds made by members of the public in a year.
The comb, found in Tanworth-in-Arden by metal detector enthusiast Russell Peach, was one of the most notable of the antiquities unearthed in 2006.

The copper-alloy comb was possibly left there between 25AD and 75AD.

Three-quarters of the finds were unearthed using metal detectors; the rest were found by accident.

Details of the discoveries were contained in the Portable Antiquities Scheme Annual Report, launched on Thursday at the British Museum.

'Living thing'

Other notable finds include a copper-alloy Roman horse and rider figure, which was found in Cambridgeshire.

A total of 58,290 finds were recorded by the project during the year 2006/2007, taking the number of finds recorded over the past decade to more than 300,000.

Culture Secretary Margaret Hodge said: "This report brings home to us once again the extent and richness of our 'hidden heritage'.

"As public interest in it continues unabated, I am pleased to acknowledge the many thousands of responsible metal detectorists and amateur archaeologists who continue to help make the past a living thing for present and future generations."

Under the Treasure Act 1996, people who find gold and silver objects more than 300 years old have a legal obligation to report them to the authorities.

Because the comb is made of copper-alloy and not gold or silver it does not qualify as a treasure find.

Important archaeological sites have been discovered as a result of the objects recorded, including Anglo-Saxon burial sites in Derbyshire, Suffolk and Warwickshire.

4 posted on 11/23/2007 7:37:06 AM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: blam
http://img.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2007/11_03/HorseManPA_468x519.jpg

I didn't know that horses had penises on their heads back then. Weird.
5 posted on 11/23/2007 7:59:47 AM PST by Jaysun (It's outlandishly inappropriate to suggest that I'm wrong.)
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To: Jaysun


I didn't know that horses had penises on their heads back then. Weird.
6 posted on 11/23/2007 8:00:17 AM PST by Jaysun (It's outlandishly inappropriate to suggest that I'm wrong.)
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To: Jaysun
I'd hit it.


7 posted on 11/23/2007 8:04:02 AM PST by Recovering Hermit ("A liberal feels a great debt to his fellow man, which debt he proposes to pay off with your money.")
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To: Recovering Hermit

That was my first thought when I saw the picture of the skeleton. LOL


8 posted on 11/23/2007 8:13:52 AM PST by fish hawk (The religion of Darwinism = Monkey Intellect)
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To: blam

Some people would steal the pennies off a dead man’s eyes.


9 posted on 11/23/2007 8:15:57 AM PST by LilAngel (FReeping on a cell phone is like making Christmas dinner in an Easy Bake Oven)
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To: blam

Fabulous find!


10 posted on 11/23/2007 8:18:53 AM PST by Ditter
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To: LilAngel

Why not?


11 posted on 11/23/2007 9:50:27 AM PST by DManA
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To: DManA

As they say, a penny stolen is a penny earned.

Or something like that.


12 posted on 11/23/2007 10:19:14 AM PST by LilAngel (FReeping on a cell phone is like making Christmas dinner in an Easy Bake Oven)
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To: LilAngel

Stolen from a dead man? You think the dead have rights?


13 posted on 11/23/2007 11:26:27 AM PST by DManA
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To: DManA

You can’t be serious. It is not okay to go to the cemetery, dig up the bodies, and keep all of the fabulous finds. And stealing the pennies off a dead man’s eyes is just plain sick.


14 posted on 11/23/2007 11:44:32 AM PST by LilAngel (FReeping on a cell phone is like making Christmas dinner in an Easy Bake Oven)
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To: LilAngel

The case under discussion wasn’t a cementary. It was a field. Whatever I find in my field is my property.


15 posted on 11/23/2007 11:49:41 AM PST by DManA
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To: DManA

It was a grave. The body was in a casket. Her final resting place. She’s not a toy.


16 posted on 11/23/2007 12:03:44 PM PST by LilAngel (FReeping on a cell phone is like making Christmas dinner in an Easy Bake Oven)
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To: LilAngel

It wasn’t a human anymore either.


17 posted on 11/23/2007 12:11:03 PM PST by DManA
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To: blam

It’s a grave for 100 years, then it is archaeology.


18 posted on 11/23/2007 12:15:09 PM PST by RightWhale (anti-razors are pro-life)
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To: blam

This unidentified woman(?), a schoolmate of the deceased, identified the body.

19 posted on 11/23/2007 12:20:05 PM PST by exile ("Get off my phone, ya big dope"- The Great One)
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To: blam; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 24Karet; 3AngelaD; 49th; ...

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·

 
Gods
Graves
Glyphs
Thanks Blam.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are Blam, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

· Google · Archaeologica · ArchaeoBlog · Archaeology magazine · Biblical Archaeology Society ·
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20 posted on 11/23/2007 8:33:11 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Sunday, November 18, 2007"'"'"'"'"'"'"'"'"'"'https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: RightWhale
That's why I'm selfishly bein' cremated.

But I'm glad she wasn't! AMAZING!

(I'll leave my combs and other stuff.)

21 posted on 11/24/2007 5:43:39 AM PST by bannie
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To: LilAngel
Just to be clear, is your contention the entire discipline of archeology is immoral?
22 posted on 11/24/2007 6:02:04 AM PST by DManA
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To: DManA

Grave robbing and desecration of human remains is sick.


23 posted on 11/24/2007 7:33:25 AM PST by LilAngel (FReeping on a cell phone is like making Christmas dinner in an Easy Bake Oven)
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To: blam

A Roman horse and rider, discovered in Cambridgeshire

Must be authentic. No stirrups. Not introduced in Europe until around 700 AD.

I was disappointed to find stirrups in Beuwolf.

24 posted on 11/24/2007 7:45:07 AM PST by Plutarch
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To: blam

Was any barley injured?


25 posted on 11/24/2007 7:49:17 AM PST by toddlintown (Five bullets and Lennon goes down. Yet not one hit Yoko. Discuss.)
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To: blam

Camilla?


26 posted on 11/24/2007 8:06:13 AM PST by stimpy17 (Home of the free because of the Brave.)
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To: LilAngel

Where does this unusual ethic come from? Haven’t you ever read that you could be breathing the remains of Julius Cesar right now?


27 posted on 11/24/2007 8:13:53 AM PST by DManA
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To: DManA

There’s nothing unusual about knowing better than to dig up dead bodies and desecrate them. Even you must have made the acquaintance of someone in your lifetime who would resist digging up the local cemetery to frolic in the remains. Is it possible that you’ve never met anyone who showed an ounce of respect to the dead? Surely you jest.


28 posted on 11/24/2007 8:33:12 AM PST by LilAngel (FReeping on a cell phone is like making Christmas dinner in an Easy Bake Oven)
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To: LilAngel

How did you come to the belief that the scientific study of ancient life is the moral equivalent of “frolicking with the dead?” No, I don’t know anyone who finds archeology “sick”.


29 posted on 11/24/2007 9:08:48 AM PST by DManA
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To: LilAngel
I wouldn't go into a contemporary cemetery and dig for two reasons.
1. They are usually private property.
2. It would cause distress to the living friends and relatives of the dead persons.
We don't maintain cemeteries for the benefit of the dead. They are for the comfort of the living, to help them come to terms with death. It sounds like death is a subject you have some issues with.
30 posted on 11/24/2007 9:18:41 AM PST by DManA
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To: DManA

You can’t tell the difference between human remains and toys, but anyone who shows respect for the dead has issues with death?


31 posted on 11/24/2007 9:26:02 AM PST by LilAngel (FReeping on a cell phone is like making Christmas dinner in an Easy Bake Oven)
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To: DManA
"Whatever I find in my field is my property."

Not if you live in England & Wales. The Treasure Act of 1996 defines what must be done if you believe you have discovered "treasure."

Here's a link that gives info on it if anyone is interested:

Click Here

If someone discovers what can be deemed as "treasure," and they don't report it, they can be fined up to $5,000 pounds ($10,306.50 US). They take their heritage very seriously in England.

32 posted on 11/24/2007 9:34:37 AM PST by mass55th (Courage is being scared to death - but saddling up anyway~~John Wayne)
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To: blam

Bill Clinton would hit on her!


33 posted on 11/24/2007 9:39:30 AM PST by Redleg Duke ("All gave some, and some gave all!")
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To: LilAngel; DManA
I come down on the side of the archaeologists in this argument...I confess, I don't know where to draw the line.

Frolic with the dead was good for a laugh this Saturday morning though, thanks.

34 posted on 11/24/2007 9:47:26 AM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: Jaysun

And riders.


35 posted on 11/24/2007 9:48:04 AM PST by TheLawyerFormerlyKnownAsAl
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To: Plutarch
"I was disappointed to find stirrups in Beuwolf."

As I was to see kilts in Braveheart.

36 posted on 11/24/2007 9:50:02 AM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: LilAngel

Why won’t you share with us the source of your veneration of the dead? You take it to an extreme that is not normal in our Judeo-Christian society.

For the third time, I find the idea of playing with dead bodies distasteful also. But that is not what we are talking about is it.


37 posted on 11/24/2007 10:40:23 AM PST by DManA
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To: LilAngel

Why won’t you share with us the source of your veneration of the dead? You take it to an extreme that is not normal in our Judeo-Christian society.

For the third time, I find the idea of playing with dead bodies distasteful also. But that is not what we are talking about is it.


38 posted on 11/24/2007 10:40:24 AM PST by DManA
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To: mass55th

Naturally, in GB as in all socialist countries everything belongs to the state.


39 posted on 11/24/2007 10:42:11 AM PST by DManA
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To: DManA

They do pay the finders the value of the “treasure” they turn over. Some folks have gotten rich by their finds. If they find the “treasure” on another person’s property, they are required to pay part of their award to the owner, which is only fair. The process has seen a larger number of people turning over their historical finds so everyone eventually gets to see them, instead of them wallowing away in someone’s private collection. It’s also given archaeologist’s, etc., an opportunity to add to the history of the country and the people who inhabited it at one time.


40 posted on 11/24/2007 10:55:27 AM PST by mass55th (Courage is being scared to death - but saddling up anyway~~John Wayne)
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To: mass55th

Well bless their little socialist souls.

Of cource I’d prefer scientific methods be used to unearth all historically significant finds anywhere.


41 posted on 11/24/2007 11:20:34 AM PST by DManA
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To: blam

Do you see a difference between a comb found in the soil and a human skeleton found in a casket? Would it ever occur to you to dismember the remains of a woman found in her grave, just to satisfy your curiosity? Can you imagine your grandparents approving the violation of anyone’s final resting place, to satisfy the idle curiosity of strangers who ignore the sanctity of life and death?


42 posted on 11/24/2007 11:23:28 AM PST by LilAngel (FReeping on a cell phone is like making Christmas dinner in an Easy Bake Oven)
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To: blam
Well, well! Looks like we've had a copyright infringement on our hands all these long years!

43 posted on 11/24/2007 11:31:50 AM PST by Egg ("...and everyone did what was right in his own eyes.")
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To: LilAngel

Do you think all autopsies are immoral? How about forensic examinations of bodies for crime investigations. How about the things morticians do to bodies?


44 posted on 11/24/2007 11:47:54 AM PST by DManA
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To: LilAngel
Is it immoral for medical students to dissect human cadavers?
45 posted on 11/24/2007 12:14:10 PM PST by DManA
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To: DManA

If you can’t defend the practice we’re talking about, just try to deflect it to other completely unrelated practices.


46 posted on 11/24/2007 1:15:24 PM PST by LilAngel (FReeping on a cell phone is like making Christmas dinner in an Easy Bake Oven)
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To: LilAngel
I don’t know why a long established and respected science needs to be defended. And since the subject is the acceptable treatment of dead bodies my question about your opinion of other treatments of dead bodies is right on topic.

But apparently you have nothing to add beyond your personal opinion that archeology is icky and archaeologists are icky people. Okey dokey.

47 posted on 11/24/2007 3:33:31 PM PST by DManA
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