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Georgia 'cheapskate' is millionaire author at 28
Atlanta Journal Constitution ^ | 12/29/07 | BILL HENDRICK

Posted on 12/29/2007 5:48:14 AM PST by Oshkalaboomboom

He fibbed his way onto the Jerry Springer Show, just to wangle a free trip to Chicago for spring break.

And right there on stage, in front of millions of TV viewers, his long dreadlocks flapping wildly like dirty-blond ropes, he got into the obligatory fight with three of his best friends from the University of Georgia.

Fists flew. Blows landed. Chairs were slung before the bouncers grabbed the flailing foursome.

Alan Corey and his friends — all warily in on the charade — were gleeful.

Sure, they'd made "total fools" out of themselves on national TV, but they'd finagled exactly what Corey wanted — a free trip to someplace other than Florida — and red-carpet treatment fit for stars, complete with a stretch limo, expensive steaks, a wad of cash and a fine hotel.

The former Walton High basketball star in east Cobb and University of Georgia graduate has always been jazzed by seemingly impossible challenges.

His first goal after college was to get a job in New York.

It took a couple of months.

His second: to become a millionaire by age 30.

He did it at 28.

His third, to write a book. He's done that, too.

The Random House title: "A Million Bucks by 30: How to Overcome a Crap Job, Stingy Parents and a Useless Degree to Become a Millionaire Before (Or After) Turning 30."

Here's how he did it.

For years, though he lived in tony east Cobb, he compulsively saved money.

He opened a 10-cent lemonade stand at 5.

"The biggest challenge, there, was my sister taking half the profits when I was doing all the work," he says.

But that taught him a lesson. And maybe it's why in the front of his book, after dedicating it to his parents, he adds on a separate page: "Just to be clear, this amazingly awesome book is not dedicated to my sister, Jill."

He learned that when it comes to money, details need to be worked out ahead of time.

Then, he started making a little more, mowing lawns for $20 a pop. And those customers recommended others. So by the time he graduated with a computer degree from UGA, he had $10,000.

"I have obsessive compulsive disorder when it comes to money," he says.

After living a couple of months in his mom's basement, he got an offer — $40,000 a year at a computer company in New York.

He flew to New York and rented a 30th-floor apartment in a federally subsidized housing project in Spanish Harlem, where he could see uptown to the lights of Yankee Stadium.

"I ate ramen noodles for more than three months, found furniture on the streets, bought huge cans of peanut butter, didn't pay for entertainment, but still had fun," he says. "I didn't hide it. I'd brag about how I could get into places."

He started doing a little stand-up comedy for free, getting drinks and some food, gratis.

"It was my entertainment, my fun," he says. "I developed a financial book fetish, reading every one I could get my hands on. I saved all I could, even opening a second savings account way across town that was too inconvenient to get there."

Within a few years, he had a substantial chunk of change, in addition to savings in 401(k) and IRA accounts.

And, oh, he also figured he could get a little help from his friends back in Georgia.

"He had the guts to take the risks in order to achieve his lofty goals," says friend Matthew Hake, who also attended Walton. "He asked to borrow $10,000 from me, promising that he would pay me back in a year with 10 percent interest."

"At the time, it was just about all I had in savings, but since he was my best friend, I couldn't say no," he said. "Not only did he pay me back six months ahead of schedule, with interest, he also made the right decision with the money and ended up making a killing on the profit of the sale of the building. Of course, I'm still waiting on a huge 'thank-you' check, but that's another story."

So, Corey became a real estate tycoon. First he bought an apartment, and remodeled it into a two-bedroom. Then a two-family townhouse in Brooklyn.

"I've sold everything except for my two-family house," he says. "I still live there with three roomies. I live in the crappiest room with no windows. The second floor is rented to random tenants. My mortgage is $2,300 a month. My rental income is $4,300 a month, so I get paid $2,000 a month for living in my own house. As long as I don't spend more than $2,000 in one month, I don't ever have to work again."

Corey's no more shy about sharing the details of his wealth than he was about peddling lemonade.

"My only house I have now can be sold for $1,175,000, and I owe $380,000 on it," Corey says. "Equity is $795,000."

He has $213,370.35 in stocks, savings and checking and $30,000 in equity in a bar. His total equity, he says, is $1,038,370.35, not counting his salary from that computer job and his rental income — more than enough to put him among the richest 2 percent of American adults.

One of his tenants is another friend from Walton, Andrew Wright, who's trying to make it as a comedian.

"Seeing as this guy was a class clown, and I was voted most likely to succeed in high school, you'd think he'd be paying rent to me instead of the other way around," Wright says.

So far, though he's lived in some rough areas, the "scariest and funniest" situation he's faced happened late one night when "I fought with some dude over a cab, and then he threw me out and yelled, 'Maybe if you could afford to live in Manhattan, you wouldn't need a cab home."

Corey laughs:

"I was 24 and owned two properties at the time."

Tons of grads from UGA and Georgia Tech live in New York, and they get together often at bars, including one where Corey's college chum Jeff Palmiotti, 29, pours libations.

Palmiotti is the guy who, with Corey, convinced the Jerry Springer Show they had a sexy story to tell.

They recruited two reluctant female friends.

"The story was, Alan was dating one, and I was dating her best friend, but I was having sex with both of them," Palmiotti says. "Springer springs the story out on the show, and Alan tried to make himself cry and got so worked up he punched me. One of the girls slapped me in the face. It was ridiculous, surreal."

Corey routinely "got dumped" by women who didn't relish eating boiled noodles.

Says mom, Nancy, a school teacher: "I'm proud of him. He's still stingy. He doesn't act like a millionaire."

But if she wants to go to a Broadway show, she has to take a friend from home.

Corey concedes he may have to alter his cheapskate ways, at least a little.

He's got a "serious" girlfriend now, Sadia Perveen, 27, of London.

"We pretty much split everything, actually," she says. "And instead of buying me flowers, he bought me a big plant that has flowers all year 'round."

He hasn't popped the question yet, but doubts it'll be long, and she knows why.

"He found out I have a friend in London with an uncle in India who can get a diamond really cheap," she says.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: bookreview; cheapskate; millionairenextdoor; millionaires
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Sure, he has a lot of money but what good is it? Sounds like a mental illness and I doubt his "fortune" will last long once his new bride figures out that eating noodles 7 days a week and decorating with other people's garbage isn't the lifestyle she wanted to settle down with. I can't see the point of having money just for the sake of saying you do. Hetty Green got to be the richest woman in the world and her son had to have his leg amputated because she spent so much time trying to find a free clinic to treat him that he got an infection. Is that what being a millionaire is all about?
1 posted on 12/29/2007 5:48:15 AM PST by Oshkalaboomboom
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To: Oshkalaboomboom

There is the legitimate and moral way to work your way up and use thrift to do it...and then there is this dirtbag.
If he is touted as the “New American Success Story”, then we might as well pack it in as a country. It seems to me he is nothing but a parasite.


2 posted on 12/29/2007 5:52:58 AM PST by DeusExMachina05 (I will not go into Dhimmitude quietly.)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom
After living a couple of months in his mom's basement, he got an offer — $40,000 a year at a computer company in New York.

He flew to New York and rented a 30th-floor apartment in a federally subsidized housing project in Spanish Harlem, where he could see uptown to the lights of Yankee Stadium.

How to get rich in America...sponge off the taxpayers (funny, he sure did hate it when his sister sponged off him)...

"My only house I have now can be sold for $1,175,000, and I owe $380,000 on it," Corey says. "Equity is $795,000."

Not for long weird boy. Most if your "wealth" is paper wealth tied to a house. Expect to take a 50% haircut to your net worth in the next few years...

3 posted on 12/29/2007 5:58:09 AM PST by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom

I dunno—he’s got the right idea, though he carries it to an extreme. I know a fair amount of people who make very good money, but piss it away on things like eating out 3X a week, Starbucks every day, new cars every 2 years, and the latest crap gadgets. A lot of people also have no tracking system for their income or savings, which is a huge mistake as well.

That being said, a $40K computer job in NYC is the equivalent of making minimum wage.


4 posted on 12/29/2007 5:58:18 AM PST by rbg81 (DRAIN THE SWAMP!!)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom
You can argue about his values all you want but he apparently did this on his own with the exception of this statement "He flew to New York and rented a 30th-floor apartment in a federally subsidized housing project in Spanish Harlem" which sticks out like a sore thumb to me. Nonetheless, good on him for doing what he wants to do.
5 posted on 12/29/2007 5:59:00 AM PST by johniegrad
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To: Oshkalaboomboom
rented a 30th-floor apartment in a federally subsidized housing project

Looks like the rest of us were his stepping stone to wealth.
6 posted on 12/29/2007 5:59:03 AM PST by visualops (artlife.us)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom

I remember a story about a secretary in New York. She had the same job all her life, never lived extravagantly, saved and invested, and left behind several million dollars when she died.


7 posted on 12/29/2007 6:00:02 AM PST by Moonman62 (The issue of whether cheap labor makes America great should have been settled by the Civil War.)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom

My husband was just like this guy, but by the time he died at age 41, he had so many investments and a huge house without a mortgage, that I am still living comfortably all these years later. I never noticed he was cheap. We lived in the best part of town, drove Lincolns (used) and were aiming to join the local country club when he died. And our children went to private school, and any college they chose.


8 posted on 12/29/2007 6:00:03 AM PST by MondoQueen
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To: DeusExMachina05
It seems to me he is nothing but a parasite.

He scams the scammers, works a regular job, saves his cash, invests in real estate and has a blast. If that's parasitism, we need more of it.

9 posted on 12/29/2007 6:00:26 AM PST by Stentor
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To: DeusExMachina05

I think he worked pretty hard for his money. He started at what age 6 with a lemonaid stand. He got meals by working. The Jerry Springer thing was stupid, but the rest of the story is inspirational to those who have doubts about making it in America.


10 posted on 12/29/2007 6:01:52 AM PST by napscoordinator
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To: MondoQueen

Sorry to hear about your husband’s death at such an early age.


11 posted on 12/29/2007 6:01:56 AM PST by johniegrad
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To: Oshkalaboomboom

Most of his status is based on the possibility of selling one house at a huge profit. A lot of people have been financially ruined by such speculation.


12 posted on 12/29/2007 6:02:21 AM PST by Ghost of Philip Marlowe (If Hillary is elected, her legacy will be telling the American people: Better put some ice on that.)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom
tony east Cobb

Now that's funny.

13 posted on 12/29/2007 6:03:33 AM PST by numberonepal (Don't Even Think About Treading On Me)
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To: Ghost of Philip Marlowe
Most of his status is based on the possibility of selling one house at a huge profit. A lot of people have been financially ruined by such speculation.

Wow, there are a lot of envious people on this thread. Hey, the kid's got a house worth over a million and only owes $300K. He's living frugally -- not spending the equity -- and you say he could be financially ruined?

Sounds like a hard-working and pretty interesting guy. Wish I'd been more like him.

14 posted on 12/29/2007 6:08:32 AM PST by BfloGuy (It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker, that we can expect . . .)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom

This story’s probably about as real as the one he told to get on Springer.

LBT
......


15 posted on 12/29/2007 6:08:46 AM PST by LiberalBassTurds (Peace is the short interlude between wars.)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom

A friend of mine recently told me the horror story of a co-worker of hers, who was determined to marry a rich lawyer.

Well, she succeeded, landing a young partner in the law firm where she worked. But the guy is so stingy he makes the creep in the article look like Santa Claus. He makes $400K a year, and yet is constantly trying to con his $30K secretary into buying him lunch. Even though his new wife is pregnant, he is FORCING her to keep working to pay for “her share” of the house he recently bought on sheriff’s sale. Plus no new clothes, no gifts of jewelry, no trips.

There’s no purpose in having money, as you say, unless you can enjoy at least some of it. People like this usually never get to the point at which they can relax and spend a little—to them, they’ve never made or saved enough.


16 posted on 12/29/2007 6:10:24 AM PST by rightwingintelligentsia (CNN: Full of plants from the DNC Plant-ation.)
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To: rbg81
A lot of people also have no tracking system for their income or savings, which is a huge mistake as well.

Don't balance your checkbook. You'll err on the conservative side and periodically move the excess to savings. It's real estate that's key, though, in making real money.

As to Federal housing ripoffs, lawyers have analogous ways to do the same thing. This kid's got gumption, and I wish him luck.

17 posted on 12/29/2007 6:11:24 AM PST by Does so (...against all enemies, DOMESTIC and foreign...)
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To: Stentor
You must have missed all the cheapskate lines and how he doesn’t spend a dime to entertain or take care of his friends but gets them to pay for his Broadway shows.

He is no different than the character Trina in Frank Norris’ McTeague, a novel about the crippling effect of greed. This guy certainly does sound like he parasites of his friends, which sounds like greed to me, and no, we don’t need more greed.

18 posted on 12/29/2007 6:11:32 AM PST by Ghost of Philip Marlowe (If Hillary is elected, her legacy will be telling the American people: Better put some ice on that.)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom
Is that what being a millionaire is all about?

He sounds a lot happier in his weird lifestyle than most people I know. Oh, and he's a millionaire too........

I'm certainly in no position to judge this guy.

19 posted on 12/29/2007 6:14:34 AM PST by Hot Tabasco (Visions of sugarplums dancing in your head are probably caused by bad drugs.....)
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To: BfloGuy
I’m not envious at all as I feel very well provided for. And it’s damn funny how people who are greedy often call those who criticize greed ‘jealous.’ There’s a difference between entreprenerualism, ambition, motivation and greed. Greed is bad. Greed is what motivates the Clintons and those like them.

You missed my point. He has a million dollars IF he sells that house for a million dollars. If he tries to sell it and only gets 300,001 dollar, he has a REAL worth of $1 profit on that house, or whatever the actuals are. Such speculation led to the housing crash of the 1920’s.

20 posted on 12/29/2007 6:15:07 AM PST by Ghost of Philip Marlowe (If Hillary is elected, her legacy will be telling the American people: Better put some ice on that.)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom

” How to Overcome a Crap Job, Stingy Parents and a Useless Degree to Become a Millionaire Before (Or After) Turning 30.”

......”stingy parents”......oh brother!....like his parents didn’t give him everything he wanted; when he wanted.....sounds like they did him a favor.....made him get off his butt and start doing for himself.


21 posted on 12/29/2007 6:16:02 AM PST by STONEWALLS
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To: rbg81
I know a fair amount of people who make very good money, but piss it away on things like eating out 3X a week, Starbucks every day, new cars every 2 years, and the latest crap gadgets.

I know a lot of them as well. People where both spouse earn $100K yet they are continually struggling keep their heads above water. Season tickets to Hurricanes, 4 wheelers for when he goes deer hunting. Hunting and fishing trips all over. New cars and pickups every couple years. Tons of gadgets. Got suckered into a $35,000 time share and now travel all over the place.

Its tough to watch sometimes.

22 posted on 12/29/2007 6:16:40 AM PST by Phantom Lord (Fall on to your knees for the Phantom Lord)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom

In 1955 if you had a million you were a real millionaire. Compare what 1 million would have bought you in 1955 to a million today. $12,000 bought you a house, $1500 bought you a car. Milk was 18 cents a quart, bread 11 cents a loaf, sodas and candy bars were 5 cents. I’m suppose to be impressed that he is a millionaire today?


23 posted on 12/29/2007 6:17:08 AM PST by Bringbackthedraft (Kennedys, Bushes, Clintons,. had enough yet, or do you want more of them?)
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To: BfloGuy

“Wow, there are a lot of envious people on this thread. Hey, the kid’s got a house worth over a million and only owes $300K. He’s living frugally — not spending the equity — and you say he could be financially ruined?

Sounds like a hard-working and pretty interesting guy. Wish I’d been more like him.”

Very much agree...


24 posted on 12/29/2007 6:22:51 AM PST by HereInTheHeartland ("We have to drain the swamp" George Bush, September 2001)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom
The lesson from all this is simple. Find something you enjoy doing, and do it. Spend less then you earn. Save the rest.

Some have trouble knowing the difference between "wants" and "needs". I suspect most regulars on FreeRepublic has learned this lesson. It is better to learn it while you are young then older, but the road to financial security begins the day you learn it.

He is much too extreme for my taste so I will never be "wealthy" like he is but I will be content to be "comfortable".

25 posted on 12/29/2007 6:27:57 AM PST by CIB-173RDABN
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To: Ghost of Philip Marlowe

Although I see your point if he owns a house in New York city the chances of it losing value is pretty slim.


26 posted on 12/29/2007 6:29:12 AM PST by ontap (Just another backstabbing conservative)
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Comment #27 Removed by Moderator

To: Oshkalaboomboom

Graduated college with $10,000 in the bank. At 28, he has $200,000+ in stocks, 30K equity in a bar, 700K equity in a house and over 2K a month profit in rental income...except for the subsidized housing part, I’d say this guy has done something right, financially.


28 posted on 12/29/2007 6:33:59 AM PST by gate2wire
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To: rbg81
I dunno—he’s got the right idea, though he carries it to an extreme.

I agree. Thrift and savings is what we want to teach our children. If they can exercise self-restraint, they will have the resources to take advantage of the opportunities life grants them.

When I first started out, I lived pretty frugally. I never bought into all the stuff other people were telling me I could afford. Then when it came time to buy a house, I had a big chunk of change to put down on it. The rest is history.

29 posted on 12/29/2007 6:34:58 AM PST by gridlock (There are 49 other states in the Union. We don't need another President from Arkansas just yet.)
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To: Does so

I favored the “Big Shovel/Little Shovel” approach to financial management when I was young. You put the money into the bank with the Big Shovel and you take it out with a Little Shovel. That way you always have money in the bank. This worked for a long time, when I did not have much finances to manage.

It becomes clear pretty early on that you want your Big Shovel to be as big as possible. If I had to fault this kid for one thing, it would be that he has not maximized his earned income. Earned income is the firm foundation, because it is something you have created yourself, that nobody can take from you.


30 posted on 12/29/2007 6:40:28 AM PST by gridlock (There are 49 other states in the Union. We don't need another President from Arkansas just yet.)
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To: gridlock

The other thing this guy did right is he (apparently) made a list of his goals. That may not seem like a big deal, but it is something most people don’t bother to do. I have found that having a list of things to accomplish is a huge asset in actually making those things happen. I can’t prove it, but I think keeping things are your mental radar screen helps you work toward it (both consciously and subconsciously) and stay directed.


31 posted on 12/29/2007 6:42:19 AM PST by rbg81 (DRAIN THE SWAMP!!)
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To: gridlock
Earned income is the firm foundation, because it is something you have created yourself, that nobody can take from you.

Except the government.

32 posted on 12/29/2007 6:42:38 AM PST by Graybeard58 ( Remember and pray for SSgt. Matt Maupin - MIA/POW- Iraq since 04/09/04)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom

I know many tightfisted people.

We always make sure NOT to call them to attend social gatherings, golf trips and sporting events.

Losers all.


33 posted on 12/29/2007 6:42:53 AM PST by relictele
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To: Graybeard58
Except the government.

They get their cut up front. I consider earned money to be the money I get to keep. The rest of that money is the protection money I pay the racket in order to be allowed to work.

34 posted on 12/29/2007 6:46:10 AM PST by gridlock (There are 49 other states in the Union. We don't need another President from Arkansas just yet.)
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To: Graybeard58

Oh, and this guy should have a plan to give away some of this money, too. Everybody should have a charitable giving plan, and pay that bill first.


35 posted on 12/29/2007 6:47:32 AM PST by gridlock (There are 49 other states in the Union. We don't need another President from Arkansas just yet.)
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To: Does so

Don’t balance your checkbook. You’ll err on the conservative side and periodically move the excess to savings.


You may work this way but (trust me) you are the exception. Most people have no discipline and will buy whatevere tickles their facy at the moment. That + have no idea how much they are spending = Massive Debt.

Keeping a budget and keeping track of your goals is key. I also set savings goals in my budget, which I almost always exceed. I have made a lot of $$ in real estate, but have paid for it with sleepless nights.


36 posted on 12/29/2007 6:48:09 AM PST by rbg81 (DRAIN THE SWAMP!!)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom
I still live there with three roomies. I live in the crappiest room with no windows.
While I appreciate this kid's initiative, this sounds more like a sentence.
37 posted on 12/29/2007 6:52:03 AM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom

I wonder if he pays his taxes?


38 posted on 12/29/2007 6:53:41 AM PST by Ditter
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To: Oshkalaboomboom
"For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?"

- Mark 8:36
39 posted on 12/29/2007 7:01:45 AM PST by mkjessup (Hunter-Bolton '08 !! Patriots who will settle for nothing less than *Victory* in the War on Terror!)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom; DeusExMachina05
" I can't see the point of having money just for the sake of saying you do..."

"There is the legitimate and moral way to work your way up and use thrift to do it...and then there is this dirtbag."

This kid is just a fast learner. There's nothing in the world more important than having money, lots of it, and letting those close to you know about it so they can learn from your example. If more people were like this kid the world would be a better place. That's one of the things that's wrong with this generation; they haven't learned to work or to invest.

/s FIL rant.

40 posted on 12/29/2007 7:02:13 AM PST by OKSooner
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To: rbg81

I know! My son makes about this, no degree to pay for but trained and certified by the industry, and he lives in HAWAII.
He’s had this job since he was 19, had his own computer business from 15-18.
He’ll be 21 soon, and I expect great things for him.
I want him to be frugal, but not obsessive.


41 posted on 12/29/2007 7:10:31 AM PST by DeLaine
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To: Moonman62

and what good did that do her?


42 posted on 12/29/2007 7:11:07 AM PST by DeLaine
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To: MondoQueen

I’m sorry to hear about your husband’s early death, but thankful he provided for you all.


43 posted on 12/29/2007 7:12:20 AM PST by DeLaine
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To: Oshkalaboomboom
I see one thing this guy did that didn’t impede his making a fortune....he is still single. There are a million men out there that would be financially stable had they never married.
44 posted on 12/29/2007 7:17:11 AM PST by vetvetdoug
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To: Oshkalaboomboom

A lot of us are “millionaires” if you count our home equity and retirement savings, value of home furnishings, life insurance, etc.

To me, a real millionaire is someone who has that in easily liquidated funds.


45 posted on 12/29/2007 7:20:57 AM PST by a real Sheila (stop hillary NOW!)
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To: Oshkalaboomboom

There are some people on this thread who really need to take a few deep breaths and relax.

This guy is the epitome of the American Dream. Ok, so he’s stingy as hell, but I imagine that’s a trait shared by the majority of the richest people in this country. And some of you seem to imply that he came by his wealth dishonestly. Did you conveniently choose to ignore that the guy remodeled houses? As stingy as he is, do you think he sat in some ivory tower and directed minions to do his bidding? I doubt it. He was probably chipping paint, sanding floors, and pounding nails himself at odd hours of the night and morning (he was working full time, remember?).

I see comments that amount to “he didn’t make his money by working hard,” or “he scammed his way into wealth.” That just tells me two things about the commenters: they are green with envy and they live in a fairy tale world. If any of you think that working hard alone will make you wealthy, you are delusional. If you think you can get wealthy by working a day job for someone else, you are either mentally retarded or completely insane.


46 posted on 12/29/2007 7:36:27 AM PST by NCSteve (I am not arguing with you - I am telling you. -- James Whistler)
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To: Bringbackthedraft

Yeah, $1M ain’t what it used to be. However, consider that most people have almost no savings and lots of debt (and I’m talking credit card debt—not mortgage debt). Given that, he’s doing pretty good.


47 posted on 12/29/2007 7:36:45 AM PST by rbg81 (DRAIN THE SWAMP!!)
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To: visualops
Maybe so, but he no longer lives there.

Unlike the chronic "multi-generational" welfare dependents, he's moved out and is prospering on his own.

While there is something personally 'unsettling' about his level of tightwaddishness, he's NOT a burden on society, has become successful and is happy with the life he's created.

Good on him! Now if we can get him to teach his technique to the rest of his former neighbors at that housing project.
48 posted on 12/29/2007 7:38:23 AM PST by MDspinboyredux
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To: NCSteve
If any of you think that working hard alone will make you wealthy, you are delusional. If you think you can get wealthy by working a day job for someone else, you are either mentally retarded or completely insane.

"No risk, no reward." Yet this guy gets hammered because he's opened himself up to risk (uncertain real estate values). A lot of these critics don't have the guts to take risks and face potential failure themselves, so they snipe at those who do.

49 posted on 12/29/2007 7:54:39 AM PST by Swordfished
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To: vetvetdoug

Only two things limit a mans wealth.His choice of a wife and his health.
Merry Christmas-Happy New Year!


50 posted on 12/29/2007 8:06:10 AM PST by DUMBGRUNT (Life is Good!)
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