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To: Stoat
traditionally served with tatties and neeps on Burns' night Anybody wanna fill me in here, I'd appreciate it.
3 posted on 01/20/2008 9:36:34 AM PST by squidly
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To: squidly

Turnips and Potatoes.


5 posted on 01/20/2008 9:37:30 AM PST by Grizzled Bear ("Does not play well with others.")
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To: squidly
Anybody wanna fill me in here, I'd appreciate it.

Tatties are mashed potatoes and neeps are turnips. Don't know about Burns' Night.

9 posted on 01/20/2008 9:40:01 AM PST by Drew68
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To: squidly
traditionally served with tatties and neeps on Burns' night Anybody wanna fill me in here, I'd appreciate it.

BBC - Burns Night - Recipes

Haggis, neeps and tatties
Haggis
A one kilogram haggis should be boiled in a large pot for approximately 20 minutes. For larger sizes, consult the label for boiling time. Vegetarians should look out for the many variations of vegetarian haggis.

Neeps
4 large turnips
50g butter
2 teaspoons caster sugar
1 teaspoon salt
Peel and quarter the turnips. Boil for 25 minutes or until soft. Drain and mash, adding the butter, sugar and salt.

Tatties
6 large Maris Piper potatoes
70 g butter
milk
salt and pepper
Peel and quarter the potatoes. Boil for 20 minutes or until soft. Drain and mash. Scold the milk by bringing it to the boil. Remove from the heat and add the butter. Add the milk mixture to the mash until preferred consistency. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Cranachan
6 heaped tablespoons porridge oats
3 tablespoons honey
1.5 pints of double cream
150g raspberries
2 teaspoons caster sugar
Cover a baking tray with parchment. Preheat oven to 160°C. Mix the honey and oatmeal thoroughly, spread the mixture on the parchment into 10 thin round shapes. Cook for 10-20 minutes until golden brown. Allow to cool. These will become wafer like when cold. Whip the cream and sugar together, add the raspberries and two of the wafers broken up. Gently stir the mixture to create a marble effect. Spoon into a cold bowl or glass dish and place a wafer on top.

Bannocks
2 cups of porridge oats
1 cup of flour
2 pinches of salt
butter or margarine
half a cup of boiling water
Pre-heat your oven to 200°C. Take a bowl and mix together the dry ingredients (you can add an optional pinch of soda bicarbonate to make them rise a little). Using a knife, cut three-quarters of a cup of butter or margarine through the dry ingredients until it looks like coarse bread crumbs. Add the boiling water and mix thoroughly until it forms a dough. Take a rolling pin and roll the dough into a thin sheet. Cut the dough into small round sections (about 7cm across) and place on a greased baking tray. Finally, cook your portions in the preheated oven for around 10 minutes.

13 posted on 01/20/2008 9:42:13 AM PST by Stoat (Rice / Coulter 2012: Smart Ladies for a Strong America)
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To: squidly

Tatties - potatoes cut up and then mashed with milk and butter. Sometimes spices are added.

Neeps - Swede (a green leafy vegetable that grows in cold climes - from the turnip family - turnip greens come in all sorts) with salt and pepper.

I’ve seen other sorts of tatties that are spuds cut into eights and allowed to fry in about 1/2” of oil, seasoned to taste.

The thing to remember about Scottish cuisine: there’s a reason you don’t see “Scottish Restaurants” in the phone book, despite the number of Scots ex-pats who have come to the US over the last 250+ years: most Scottish cuisine is very poor fare. The Highlanders were a poor and persecuted people, and their food was more or less than what was left over. Traditional haggis is but one example of this: offal, oats and spices, served up in a sheeps stomach.

You’re not about to see that served up on the Food Network by any of their shiney-happy-people chefs.

Even malt whisky is the result of poverty. Most people don’t know this, but the Scots used to drink ale, not whisky, as their national drink.

Then the English levied a malt tax on all products made from malted grains - by volume. You pay more tax on beer than whisky and so the nation of Scotland became moonshiners up in the hollows and glens. US moonshiners in the south have as their heritage the Scottish tax avoidance of the malt tax - US moonshiners just use corn instead of barley as their feedstock. Anyway, you get the idea — the Scots were poor, they weren’t about to pay a tax on their booze, so they went to whisky as a means of avoiding the malt tax and the rest, as they say, is history.


19 posted on 01/20/2008 9:47:02 AM PST by NVDave
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To: squidly
Burns night?


91 posted on 01/20/2008 5:16:11 PM PST by Larry Lucido (Thompson/Hunter 2008)
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To: squidly

Tatties are mashed potatoes. Neeps are turnips. Burns night is a celebration of the poet Robert Burns.

I had eaten Haggis loads of times and thought it was excellent. Then I found out what it was made of and never ate it again.

;)


94 posted on 01/20/2008 5:28:36 PM PST by KarenMarie
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