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Under Real ID, privacy will be nonexistent
The Examiner ^ | 21 Jan 2008 | Melanie Scarborough

Posted on 01/22/2008 12:28:56 PM PST by BGHater

Welcome to Amerika. With its recent issuance of rules for implementing the “Real ID” law - the requirement that states issue driver’s licenses according to federal dictates and link the information to a nationwide database - the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has taken another page from the Soviets’ playbook. Stalin required Russian citizens to carry an internal passport ostensibly because “counterrevolutionaries” posed a threat. Amerikans will be required to show their papers to prove they aren’t terrorists or illegal immigrants.

Because an internal passport is the hallmark of totalitarianism, DHS Secretary Michael Chertoff is trying to play Americans for fools. He insists that Real ID, which must meet federal standards and be used for federal purposes, is not a federal identity card because the states will be the issuing agents. That‘s like your employer trying to convince you he has no control over your salary because the checks come through the payroll department.

Seventeen states have passed legislation or resolutions opposing Real ID, and 19 other states have such actions pending because they recognize what Congress did not: If this law is actually implemented, it will mean the end of privacy and freedom.

That is inevitable because the amount of information required to be imbedded on the card will increase, as will the places where its presentation is required. Congress originally suggested that the card would be necessary to enter federal buildings, board commercial aircraft, open a bank account, or access nuclear power plants - but allowed expansions “for any other purposes that the [DHS[ Secretary shall determine.” Secretary Michael Chertoff already has added entry to national parks to the list.

And don’t forget that Congress foolishly gave the Secret Service authority to control national events such as Super Bowls and presidential inaugurations. Merely to watch a football game, Amerikans will have to show their papers.

Privacy will be non-existent because the DHS dictates that identity cards must have bar codes readable by common technology. So not only will tens of thousands of government employees have access to your Social Security number, date of birth, residential address, etc., but every private facility that requires you to present ID will capture that information as well. Identify theft will be child’s play.

Perhaps the most alarming aspect of Real ID is that it transfers to the government ultimate control over citizens’ movements. The ID card of a citizen not in good standing could have a hold put on it, just like a credit card can. If your ID card is declined, you will be unable to travel, access your money, get a job, enter buildings, or go about the basic routines of life until you have restored favor with your government.

Think that’s hyperbole? Driver’s licenses already are used for such purposes. In Texas, a driver's license can be suspended for failure to provide requested medical information to the government. In Florida, a license can be revoked for "an immoral act in which a motor vehicle was used." Wisconsin residents can lose their driver's licenses for failure to pay library fines, shovel the snow off their sidewalk, or trim a tree overhanging a neighbor's property. Montana residents are not allowed to drive if they default on college loans. Many states punish those who fail to pay child support, taxes, court judgments, or parking fines by revoking their driver's licenses.

Effectively "grounding" adults is cheaper than sending them to jail, and a national ID card linked to a central database would allow the government to be all that more efficient. Want to board a plane in North Carolina? Not until you pay those library fines in Wisconsin.

The real travesty is that it is all for nothing because it won’t make anyone safer. Establishing someone’s identity does not reveal their intent. In a pathetically vapid defense of Real ID, Chertoff asks, “Should banks cash checks from people who cannot prove who they are? Should parents hire baby-sitters they know nothing about? Should airlines let passengers on board without validating their identity?”

Well, knowing that the babysitter is, in fact, Suzy Smith, says nothing about her skill with children. A bank needs to know whether a check is good, not the bearer’s immigration status. Knowing a traveler’s Social Security number doesn’t tell an airport screener whether the individual is carrying a bomb.

National identity cards don’t make anyone safer; they only make citizens less free. Real ID is a real bad law that Congress ought to repeal. Real soon.

Examiner Columnist Melanie Scarborough lives in Alexandria.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; Government
KEYWORDS: boogeyman; dhs; endisnear; privacy; realid; security; tinfoilhat
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1 posted on 01/22/2008 12:28:58 PM PST by BGHater
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To: BGHater

Identity theft is already child’s play, and she neglects to address how this will affect our twenty million uninvited guests.


2 posted on 01/22/2008 12:31:08 PM PST by A Balrog of Morgoth (QMC(SW) USN........ CG21 DD988 FFG34 PC6 ARS53)
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To: BGHater

I hate articles that use “Amerika” “Amerikkka” etc. It’s childish. It’s usually leftists who do this, but sometimes far right nutters too.

People who oppose Real I.D. tend to have a not-very-secret open borders agenda. Wihtout some verifyable form of ID attempts to stop illegal invasion will falter. I heard Chertoff on the radio being interviewed. Today the border patrol has something like 1,000 types of ID that people can use to gain entry to the USA. (They are cutting that way down shortly.)


3 posted on 01/22/2008 12:33:41 PM PST by Jack Black
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To: BGHater

“If this law is actually implemented, it will mean the end of privacy and freedom. “

I find it hard to take her seriously when she makes statements like this.

We already have a National ID card. It’s called the social security card. It consists of a piece of paper, a number and a name. As far as I can tell it is the most easily forged combination of elements you can get to still be considered an ID.


4 posted on 01/22/2008 12:34:53 PM PST by Moral Hazard (Fred Thompson/Joe Don Baker in 08, because America needs bald, beefy character actors!)
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To: BGHater
The ID card of a citizen not in good standing could have a hold put on it, just like a credit card can. If your ID card is declined, you will be unable to travel, access your money, get a job, enter buildings, or go about the basic routines of life until you have restored favor with your government.

Just wait until you have to have your ID scanned before starting your car.

5 posted on 01/22/2008 12:37:55 PM PST by Ancesthntr (Iíve joined the Frederation.)
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To: BGHater

This’ll be no more an intrusion on freedom than a driver’s license is. You’ve got to show it everytime you’re pulled over, and to cash checks or use credit cards. The Texas Gov’t didn’t use my driver’s license to “end freedom”.

H


6 posted on 01/22/2008 12:42:17 PM PST by SnakeDoctor
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To: Moral Hazard

Real-ID isn’t a good thing, especially in the hands of the DNC.

Anyone who fails to see what the Dems are going to do with it once they have control, is a fool.

Do Stalin’s purges ring a bell here?


7 posted on 01/22/2008 12:42:46 PM PST by viper592
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To: Moral Hazard

And the only places that are legally allowed to use your SSN are your employer and your bank. And we see hoe THAT is abused.


8 posted on 01/22/2008 12:44:44 PM PST by Blood of Tyrants (G-d is not a Republican. But Satan is definitely a Democrat.)
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To: Hemorrhage

Sure. Of course this whole argument is academic. It won’t be long before they do away with ID cards and just go to an implantable RFID chip that you will have to have and they will require all babies chipped at birth. It’s for terrorism and illegal aliens, you won’t mind the intrusion.


9 posted on 01/22/2008 12:54:42 PM PST by rednesss (Fred Thompson - 2008)
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To: Jack Black

Its not the ID itself that is most troubling, but its the incremental chipping away of our liberty. Every law the government passes makes us less and less free. We have to lick the boots of high school dropout TSA employees to get on a flight. We work for half of the year to pay the IRS. Our internet use is monitored. Our liberty is eroded in hundreds of small ways every day that adds up to us being slaves of our Government.


10 posted on 01/22/2008 12:56:53 PM PST by Astronaut
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To: rednesss

>> Sure. Of course this whole argument is academic. It won’t be long before they do away with ID cards and just go to an implantable RFID chip that you will have to have and they will require all babies chipped at birth. It’s for terrorism and illegal aliens, you won’t mind the intrusion.

That was a big leap.

H


11 posted on 01/22/2008 12:58:16 PM PST by SnakeDoctor
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To: Moral Hazard

We ALREADY have DL cards.

This law is stating the minimum standards for those cards.

Don’t want a DL? State ID? don’t get one.

This just means all states have to have the same standard. No more weak link states.


12 posted on 01/22/2008 1:01:16 PM PST by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
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To: Hemorrhage

Perhaps not so large a leap.

10 years? Maybe 25? Certainly less that 50.


13 posted on 01/22/2008 1:03:15 PM PST by null and void (We're tired of being sucked up to once every 4 years and stabbed in the back the rest of the time.)
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To: Hemorrhage
There's nothing more that the government would like to do than track your every movement, and then tax it.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1595550208/qid=1122390116/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/103-0153237-3698200?v=glance

14 posted on 01/22/2008 1:03:47 PM PST by rednesss (Fred Thompson - 2008)
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To: rednesss

You don’t need to implant anythign.

Biometric data will know who you are.

Smile a satelite just photographed you...


15 posted on 01/22/2008 1:03:56 PM PST by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
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To: Jack Black
Amerikans will be required to show their papers to prove they aren’t terrorists or illegal immigrants.

Provided we lock up the terrorists and deport the illegals, I won't mind occasionally showing an authority figure my drivers' liscence.

16 posted on 01/22/2008 1:05:44 PM PST by 50sDad (Liberals: Never Happy, Never Grateful, Never Right.)
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To: Jack Black
Amerikans will be required to show their papers to prove they aren’t terrorists or illegal immigrants.

Provided we lock up the terrorists and deport the illegals, I won't mind occasionally showing an authority figure my drivers' liscence.

17 posted on 01/22/2008 1:05:49 PM PST by 50sDad (Liberals: Never Happy, Never Grateful, Never Right.)
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To: null and void

>> Perhaps not so large a leap. 10 years? Maybe 25? Certainly less that 50.

This is classic straw-man garbage — take a reasonable measure to absurd proportions, and argue against the absurdity.

The leap was assuming I would be OK with forced implantation of a device simply because I have no problem with an ID requirement. One is a reasonable security measure, with little downside and little to no intrusion on the rights of the individual — the other is not.

H


18 posted on 01/22/2008 1:07:06 PM PST by SnakeDoctor
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To: null and void

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/3697940.stm


19 posted on 01/22/2008 1:08:24 PM PST by rednesss (Fred Thompson - 2008)
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To: rednesss

>> There’s nothing more that the government would like to do than track your every movement, and then tax it.

OK. So? I have a state ID in my wallet right now (and I’ve had one for well over a decade) ... and nobody in my state is tracking me.

ID requirements are neither unreasonable nor particularly intrusive.

H


20 posted on 01/22/2008 1:10:33 PM PST by SnakeDoctor
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