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Rising beer prices could leave you tapped out
MSNBC.com ^ | By Alex Johnson

Posted on 01/26/2008 7:52:08 AM PST by DeaconBenjamin

Small brewers line up to pay premium prices for scarce ingredients

Double-whammy shortages of two main ingredients are threatening to send the price of beer significantly higher, just in time for the national drinking holiday known as Super Bowl Sunday.

* * *

In September, Martin paid $4 for a pound for hops. By late October, he said, it was $50 a pound. Likewise, barley prices have almost doubled in the same period.

Just a few weeks ago, George Peterson, owner of Central Coast Brewery in San Luis Obispo, Calif., spent $160 to brew a batch of beer equal to eight kegs. Last week, he was spending a staggering $920 per batch.

(Excerpt) Read more at msnbc.msn.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: barley; beer; homebrew
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To: DeaconBenjamin

I am sure the big corporate beer producers like Budweiser are happy - the little guy goes out of business such as the brewpubs. I refuse to drink the big brand beer products - taste like crap.


51 posted on 01/26/2008 10:02:43 AM PST by CORedneck
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To: B Knotts

B Knotts wrote:

“Barley prices were unchanged ($.90/lb for 2-row, $1.15/lb for domestic, $1.79/lb for import) at my local brew store. Hops were up a bit, but not all that much.”

Your homebrew store has high prices and you are not seeing reality as a result. Hops and barley are way up on the open market. I buy my grain from North Country Malt Supply - a major dealer - and I have seen a sack of Maris Otter go from $23.00 a bag to $39.43 a bag in only two years. Hops from Freshops have gone up substantially as well (and Freshops buys directly from the growers).

The facts are: Grain and hop prices are way up because more acreage is being devoted to corn (thank you ethanol freaks - let’s burn more of our food), and fuel costs for transport are through the roof.

All of that said, I’m glad I brew my own. Six pack prices are up to $9.00 for premium craft beers. I can still brew ten gallons for less than $20.00. (Unfortunately, that doesn’t count the cost of the system I built - which is now up to around $8-10K. My wife likes to remind me of that).


52 posted on 01/26/2008 10:21:28 AM PST by Ned Buntline
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To: rellimpank

Grrrrrrr...


53 posted on 01/26/2008 11:10:35 AM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: -=SoylentSquirrel=-

I just got my hands on 5 five-gallon buckets of wheat. I’m going to malt it myself and turn it into beer. I’ve also started stockpiling herbs and spices to make my own gruit...forget hops...who needs it. Wild rosemary, heather leaf, heather flower, yarrow, mugwort, sweet gale, spruce, pine, and grand wormwood.


54 posted on 01/26/2008 11:33:53 AM PST by mamelukesabre
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To: bmwcyle

There’s no tax on beer ingredients.


55 posted on 01/26/2008 11:36:00 AM PST by mamelukesabre
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To: knews_hound
Oof. I may have to go back to making moonshine. I used to be able to produce my own 110 proof Ferocious Cirrhosis Total Amnesia Frontal Lobotomy Whiskey for about $1.50 a quart.
56 posted on 01/26/2008 11:39:21 AM PST by Manic_Episode (Some mornings, it's just not worth chewing through the leather straps...)
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To: o_zarkman44

Bud is made from rice, miller is made from corn. I believe coors is also made from corn. They throw in just enough barley and hops to allow them to legally call it beer, otherwise they would be forced to call it “malt liquor”, or something like that. From what I understand, they dont use actual hops, but hop oil instead. It’s made from hops.


57 posted on 01/26/2008 11:42:18 AM PST by mamelukesabre
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To: DeaconBenjamin
There's no inflation in the US. BLS tells me so.

Shows how much BLS knows. My Rolling Rock just went from $4.99 to $5.19. Robbery!

58 posted on 01/26/2008 11:43:30 AM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: knews_hound

I add honey to my beer wort. I think it’s good.


59 posted on 01/26/2008 11:44:42 AM PST by mamelukesabre
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To: mamelukesabre

Well, when I get my tax “Rebate” in May, June, July, August,
after I’ve paid my taxes in April, I’m gonna go buy me some beer!


60 posted on 01/26/2008 11:45:48 AM PST by jamndad5 ("I ask, sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people, except for a few public officials.")
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To: Rush4U

40s are generally malt liquor, not beer. No hops, lots of corn sugar added.


61 posted on 01/26/2008 11:46:12 AM PST by mamelukesabre
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To: DeaconBenjamin
Rising beer prices could leave you tapped out

Switch to Kester, cheap brand Brandy, 6.99$ for a good size bottle, the resulting Brain humm equals to 15 Beer. I pay that much for 1.4 Beer in a Bar.
62 posted on 01/26/2008 11:51:27 AM PST by modican
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To: DeaconBenjamin

In the good old days, we could just buy a gallon of hop-flavored malt syrup. With a 5-pound bag of sugar and a 3-pack of dried yeast, we could make a 25-gallon Unfortunately, that syrup is no longer available, but it made a very tasty homebrew.


63 posted on 01/26/2008 12:00:03 PM PST by redhead (VICTORY FIRST, THEN PEACE)
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To: mamelukesabre

Ahh, as you can tell, I’m not a drinker! Thanks for the lesson though.


64 posted on 01/26/2008 12:03:28 PM PST by Rush4U
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To: Freedom4US

Start simple. Forget the wort chiller and the propane boiling setup.

step 1: sanitize your fermentation bucket and rinse thouroghly, then put approx 3.5 gallons of cold water in your fermentation bucket and set it outside on a very cold day.

step 2: sanitize an ordinary drinking glass with cheap vodka and fill 1/4 full with pure distilled water. Add yeast packet, swirl around untill mixed up well and set aside.

Step 3: boil a gallon of water and two cans of hopped malt syrup on the stove for 30-45 minutes. (or one can of hopped and one can of unhopped, or one can of hopped and 2-3 lbs or so of corn sugar)

Step 4: set your water glass containing yeast in a bowl of hot water to warm it up.

Step 5: boil some tea with sugar in it. Then put a tablespoon or two of the sweet tea into your yeast. The tea adds nutrients to your yeast and makes it multiply faster. It’s important that the sugar is boiled WITH the tea. The sugar needs to be sanitized. Karo brand corn syrup works too...even if it has vanila flavoring, that’s fine.

Step 6: Bring in your super cold fermentation bucket and dump in your boiled wort.

Step 7: By now your yeast should have a nice thick foamy head and your fermentation bucket should be about 78-80 degrees. Pour in the yeast and add the lid. If you use a fermentation lock, use cheap vodka in it, not water or bleach solution.

EASY, NOTHING TO IT.


65 posted on 01/26/2008 12:14:06 PM PST by mamelukesabre
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To: knews_hound
I just don’t like Mead. Go figure....

Do you like lambic?

66 posted on 01/26/2008 12:32:10 PM PST by -=SoylentSquirrel=-
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To: DeaconBenjamin

Classically


67 posted on 01/26/2008 1:13:19 PM PST by Gondring (I'll give up my right to die when hell freezes over my dead body!)
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To: Last Dakotan

It’s not just percapata. Wisconsin drinks the most Brandy period. 75% of all Brandy consumed anywhere, is consumed in Cheesconsin.


68 posted on 01/26/2008 1:52:19 PM PST by Thebaddog (Is there a more perfect animal than a dog?)
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To: -=SoylentSquirrel=-; mamelukesabre

I add Honey or Candi Sugar to my “Liquid Panty Remover” a Duvel Clone to up the ABV yet keep the color SRM 5 or so.

The Lambics I can take or leave. Some of the more ..., unusual yeast profiles are just not my cup of tea.

Cheers,

knewshound


69 posted on 01/26/2008 1:54:04 PM PST by knews_hound (I drive a Hybrid. It burns both gas AND rubber.)
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To: mamelukesabre

Alton Brown of the Food Network has a good method with his recipe:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,1977,FOOD_9936_20302,00.html


70 posted on 01/26/2008 1:57:44 PM PST by jonrick46
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To: knews_hound
I add Honey or Candi Sugar to my “Liquid Panty Remover” a Duvel Clone to up the ABV yet keep the color SRM 5 or so.

Isn't it just easier to add Rohypnol?

71 posted on 01/26/2008 2:07:59 PM PST by Sawdring
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To: Thebaddog

I hope you mean 75% of brandy consumed in america.


72 posted on 01/26/2008 3:02:25 PM PST by mamelukesabre
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To: knews_hound

Just curious...do you apply this directly to the panty and scrape/peel, or do you let it soak for awhile and let the panty fall off on it’s own?


73 posted on 01/26/2008 3:04:58 PM PST by mamelukesabre
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To: jonrick46

THat’s a big batch of beer. I think too big for a first try.


74 posted on 01/26/2008 3:08:26 PM PST by mamelukesabre
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To: Sawdring

That would take all the challenge out of it, and besides, I am a DIY kind of guy....

Cheers,

knewshound


75 posted on 01/26/2008 3:11:14 PM PST by knews_hound (I drive a Hybrid. It burns both gas AND rubber.)
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To: o_zarkman44

Very interesting data. Thanks for the insight. You could have left off the stupid part.

LLS


76 posted on 01/26/2008 3:29:57 PM PST by LibLieSlayer (Support America, Kill terrorists, Destroy dims and vote for?)
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To: DeaconBenjamin
At least Budweiser has nothing to worry about since the main grain they use is rice.

Just the recipe to get the great unwashed to swill their swill.

"Tastes great and it's much cheaper than those snooty micro-brews! Drink up!"

77 posted on 01/26/2008 3:35:18 PM PST by Bloody Sam Roberts (Bureaucracy is a parasite that preys on Free Thought and suffocates Free Spirit.)
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To: jonrick46
I recorded and burned to DVD his "Amber Waves" episode of "Good Eats".

It makes for good viewing when you are getting ready to brew up a batch. Keeps the basic right in your face so you can't screw up.

78 posted on 01/26/2008 3:39:12 PM PST by Bloody Sam Roberts (Bureaucracy is a parasite that preys on Free Thought and suffocates Free Spirit.)
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To: hinckley buzzard
My Rolling Rock just went from $4.99 to $5.19. Robbery!

I hope that's not for a 12 pack of bottles.
Around here it's $10.49 for a 12 pack of bottles. I've noticed the ad signs, thinking it a good price.
I don't drink the stuff m'self...I'm an ale man. Smithwick's or SA Boston Ale.

79 posted on 01/26/2008 3:44:30 PM PST by Bloody Sam Roberts (Bureaucracy is a parasite that preys on Free Thought and suffocates Free Spirit.)
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To: mamelukesabre
It makes seven gallons. Most recipes I have seen make between four and seven gallons.

The first home brew I made was with my grandfather using a crock pot, a three pound tin of hop flavored Blue Ribbon Malt extract, 10 lbs of sugar, ten gallons of water and a package of Fleischmann’s Yeast. We did not even use an air lock system (just a terry cloth towel to cover it). He had beer year round. The biggest expense will be the bottle top applier (Make sure you use non-screw top bottles).

80 posted on 01/26/2008 4:00:46 PM PST by jonrick46
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To: mamelukesabre

I add the alcohol and let the Panty fall off on its own :)

Its all in the lubrication!

Cheers,

knewshound


81 posted on 01/26/2008 4:38:01 PM PST by knews_hound (I drive a Hybrid. It burns both gas AND rubber.)
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To: mamelukesabre

All Brandy. Ever had a Brandy Manhattan? Me neither.


82 posted on 01/26/2008 5:02:10 PM PST by Thebaddog (Is there a more perfect animal than a dog?)
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To: jonrick46

No. It clearly states “two seven gallon fermentors”.


83 posted on 01/26/2008 5:06:45 PM PST by mamelukesabre
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To: Thebaddog
Wisconsin drinks the most Brandy period.

Most all of it in a drink termed the Brandy Old-Fashioned you probably won't see anywhere else.


84 posted on 01/26/2008 5:31:43 PM PST by Last Dakotan
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To: DeaconBenjamin

Probably more fallout from from the great ethanol boondoggle. I expect to see every available acre planted in corn this spring.


85 posted on 01/26/2008 6:00:16 PM PST by The Great RJ ("Mir we bleiwen wat mir sin" or "We want to remain what we are." ..Luxembourg motto)
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To: Last Dakotan

Is that a supperclub menu I spy on the table? I have never had such a fresh and tasty meal as in a Supper Club near Two Rivers, Wisconsin.


86 posted on 01/27/2008 7:55:42 AM PST by Thebaddog (Is there a more perfect animal than a dog?)
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To: Freedom4US
Inflation is always a monetary phenomenon.

I see. So you define inflation as an increase in money supply. Then what does this chart of M2 tell you? Do we have inflation?


87 posted on 01/27/2008 12:00:02 PM PST by DeaconBenjamin
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To: Bloody Sam Roberts

What is good about his method is the use of a bag of ice to cool the “wort” quickly before adding the yeast. This greatly speeds up the work and quickly gets the wort in an air locked system to protect against contanimation.


88 posted on 01/27/2008 3:36:39 PM PST by jonrick46
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To: mamelukesabre
You may have missed the last part of Alton Brown’s procedures:
“Attach the siphon on the spigot and transfer beer from one fermenter to the second one.” This is what is called the “racking” procedure. This separates what will be a sparkling cold beer from the sediment that will give your beer a heavy yeast taste if mixed in. The second 7 gallon fermenter is used for racking and not for making what you thought is 14 gallons of beer. It is the vessel that takes the fermented beer off of the bottom sediment and gets it into a vessel for priming. At this time, the yeast in the beer has eaten up all the sugars and releases very little CO2.

Priming puts sugar into the beer to kick up the yeast with more food to make that nice carbonation we love in a cold bottle of beer. To do this one needs to stir a mixture of corn sugar and water (that has been boiled for sterilization) into the beer just before bottling. In Alton Brown’s recipe, he uses 3/4 cups of corn sugar mixed to one pint of water. Because this is a hot water-sugar mixture, you need to get the beer stirring quickly and add in a steady stream to keep it from overheating the live yeast.

The sediment you saw at the bottom of the first fermenter is still valuable, so don’t throw it all down the sink. Save a cup of it in a jar and store in the refrigerator. It will be the yeast for your next batch of beer.

89 posted on 01/27/2008 4:30:50 PM PST by jonrick46
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To: jonrick46
You’re right. I saw the two fermentors and jumped to conclusions.

But I like my method better. Just leave the fermentor and water outside on a very cold day. You don’t need to mess around with ice. There are ways to get around the priming sugar and second bucket. You can use munton’s carb tabs. You can use camden tablets and a keg and CO2 bottle. Or you can go the barleywine route and let your brew sit in your basement for 6 months to a year. It will eventually carbonate without adding sugar if you are making higher alcohol recipes.

BTW, I don’t know why you think you need to explain to me the procedure for adding priming sugar. I’ve got 8 secondary fermentors going right now as we speak.

Here’s a better method for your priming sugar: Add the hot sugary water mixture to the bottling bucket FIRST. Then let it sit for a few minutes. THEN transfer your beer to the bottling bucket.

90 posted on 01/27/2008 4:56:48 PM PST by mamelukesabre
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To: mamelukesabre

Good information. I’ll still prime my beer with corn sugar. I like the technique of putting it on the bottom of the priming vessel. That way you can fill it and mix it at the same time. You then minimize oxidation, which is bad at that stage.


91 posted on 01/27/2008 7:07:43 PM PST by jonrick46
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To: snowsislander

Hops have very specific, and rather peculiar, climatic requirements. They need latitudes higher than 40 degrees, long growing seasons, and mild summers with low humidities. Ther isn’t much room for expansion among hop production, because most places on earth aren’t suitable. Hops are already grown pretty much everywhere that they can be grown.


92 posted on 01/28/2008 9:13:06 AM PST by Renfield (Turning apples into venison since 1999!)
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To: o_zarkman44

The word is, according to brewing newspapers, that the big guys, (AB et al.) have developed a formula for using high-alpha (the most powerful/bitter) hops. These varieties were originally developed for extra-hopped craft brews (IPAs, American Pale Ales, etc.) and can actually have several times the hopping power of traditional hops. While AB & friends won’t change the taste of their (very) bland beers, this makes for very efficient hopping...in that they can use dramatically less hops for the same amount of beer.

Unfortunately this move alone has driven up the prices of high-alpha hops....the kind most craft-brewers—and home brewers too—depend on.

It seems like the “perfect storm” has conspired to make beer pricey.

Maybe I should start making mead.


93 posted on 01/29/2008 7:09:21 AM PST by AnalogReigns
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To: DeaconBenjamin

Real OLD News Alert!


94 posted on 01/29/2008 7:10:41 AM PST by toddlintown (Building More Highways For Children---Huckleberry Talking Point)
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To: DeaconBenjamin

Hop-onomics 101

http://beerinfood.wordpress.com/2007/12/21/hop-onomics-101/


95 posted on 01/29/2008 7:13:00 AM PST by toddlintown (Building More Highways For Children---Huckleberry Talking Point)
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To: o_zarkman44

Hop-onomics 101

http://beerinfood.wordpress.com/2007/12/21/hop-onomics-101/


96 posted on 01/29/2008 7:13:28 AM PST by toddlintown (Building More Highways For Children---Huckleberry Talking Point)
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To: DeaconBenjamin

It’s not inflation.

http://beerinfood.wordpress.com/2007/12/21/hop-onomics-101/


97 posted on 01/29/2008 7:14:44 AM PST by toddlintown (Building More Highways For Children---Huckleberry Talking Point)
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To: o_zarkman44

It’s more and more fields being dedicated to ethanol corn production. Al Gore stole your beer.


98 posted on 01/29/2008 7:21:02 AM PST by Dionysius (Jingoism is no vice.)
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To: DeaconBenjamin

Just as the price of good red’s stay the same.


99 posted on 01/29/2008 7:27:44 AM PST by gathersnomoss (General George Patton had it right.)
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