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Thousands Of Crop Varieties Depart For Arctic Seed Vault
Science Daily ^ | 1-26-2008 | Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research.

Posted on 01/26/2008 11:09:25 PM PST by blam

Thousands Of Crop Varieties Depart For Arctic Seed Vault

Packaging seeds. Thousands of Crop Varieties from Four Corners of the World Depart for Arctic Seed Vault. (Credit: CIMMYT, Mexico.)

ScienceDaily (Jan. 26, 2008) — At the end of January, more than 200,000 crop varieties from Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East—drawn from vast seed collections maintained by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR)—will be shipped to a remote island near the Arctic Circle, where they will be stored in the Svalbard Global Seed Vault (SGSV), a facility capable of preserving their vitality for thousands of years.

The cornucopia of rice, wheat, beans, sorghum, sweet potatoes, lentils, chick peas and a host of other food, forage and agroforestry plants is to be safeguarded in the facility, which was created as a repository of last resort for humanity’s agricultural heritage. The seeds will be shipped to the village of Longyearbyen on Norway’s Svalbard archipelago, where the vault has been constructed on a mountain deep inside the Arctic permafrost.

The vault was built by the Norwegian government as a service to the global community, and a Rome-based international NGO, the Global Crop Diversity Trust, will fund its operation. The vault will open on February 26, 2008.

This first installment from the CGIAR collections will contain duplicates from international agricultural research centers based in Benin, Colombia, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, Peru, the Philippines and Syria. Collectively, the CGIAR centers maintain 600,000 plant varieties in crop genebanks, which are widely viewed as the foundation of global efforts to conserve agricultural biodiversity.

“Our ability to endow this facility with such an impressive array of diversity is a powerful testament to the incredible work of scientists at our centers, who have been so dedicated to ensuring the survival of the world’s most important crop species,” said Emile Frison, Director General of Rome-based Bioversity International, which coordinates CGIAR crop diversity initiatives.

“The CGIAR collections are the ‘crown jewels’ of international agriculture,” said Cary Fowler, Executive Director of the Global Crop Diversity Trust, which will cover the costs of preparing, packaging and transporting CGIAR seeds to the Arctic. “They include the world’s largest and most diverse collections of rice, wheat, maize and beans. Many traditional landraces of these crops would have been lost had they not been collected and stored in the genebanks.”

For example, the wheat collection held just outside Mexico City by the CGIAR-supported International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) contains 150,000 unique samples of wheat and its relatives from more than 100 countries. It is the largest unified collection in the world for a single crop. Overall, the maize collection represents nearly 90 percent of maize diversity in the Americas, where the crop originated. CIMMYT will continue to send yearly shipments of regenerated seed until the entire collection of maize and wheat has been backed up at Svalbard.

Storage of these and all the other seeds at Svalbard is intended to ensure that they will be available for bolstering food security should a manmade or natural disaster threaten agricultural systems, or even the genebanks themselves, at any point in the future.

“We need to understand that genebanks are not seed museums but the repositories of vital, living resources that are used almost every day in the never-ending battle against major threats to food production,” Bioversity International’s Frison said. “We’re going to need this diversity to breed new varieties that can adapt to climate change, new diseases and other rapidly emerging threats.”

Why are genebanks important?

The CGIAR collections are famous in plant breeding circles as a treasure trove for plant breeders searching for traits to help them combat destructive crop diseases and pests, such as the black sigatoka fungus, which is devastating banana production in East Africa, and grain borer beetle, which is destroying maize in Kenya.

Just from January to August of 2007, CGIAR centers distributed almost 100,000 samples. The materials mainly go to researchers and plant breeders seeking genetic traits to create new crop varieties that offer such benefits as higher yields, improved nutritional value, resistance to pests and diseases, and the ability to survive changing climatic conditions, which are expected to make floods and drought more frequent.

In addition, these collections have often been used to help restore agricultural systems after conflicts and natural disasters.

For example, among the 135,000 food and forage seeds maintained at the CGIAR-supported International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) in Aleppo, Syria, 3,000 varieties are native to Afghanistan, and 1,000 are from Iraq. The seeds preserved have been used to help revitalize crop diversity in these war-torn regions.

“Svalbard will be able to help replenish genebanks if they’re hit,” said Cary Fowler. Iraq’s genebank in the town of Abu Ghraib was ransacked by looters in 2003. Fortunately there was a safety duplicate at the CGIAR center in Syria. Typhoon Xangsane seriously damaged the genebank of the Philippines national rice genebank in 2006. “Unfortunately, these kinds of national genebank horror stories are fairly common place,” said Fowler. “The Svalbard Global Seed Vault makes the CGIAR’s genebank collections safer than ever.”

After the Asian tsunami disaster of 2004, the CGIAR-supported International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) used its collections to provide farmers with rice varieties suitable for growing in fields that had been inundated with salt water. The genebank at the CGIAR-supported International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) in Palmira, Colombia was instrumental in providing bean varieties to farmers in Honduras and Nicaragua in the aftermath of Hurricane Mitch in 1998.

According to Geoff Hawtin, Acting Director General of CIAT and former executive director of the Rome-based Global Crop Diversity Trust, “The shipments going to Svalbard from the CGIAR genebanks are a vital measure for further safeguarding the world’s crop collections. With coming climatic changes, higher food prices, and expanding markets for biofuels, our best available options for progress, if not survival, will be in what we have conserved and studied against all thinkable predictions.”

Adapted from materials provided by Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: crop; fortressofsolitude; godsgravesglyphs; seed; superman; varieties; vault

1 posted on 01/26/2008 11:09:27 PM PST by blam
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To: SunkenCiv
GGG Ping

Doomsday Arctic Seed Vault Designed to Withstand All Perils

2 posted on 01/26/2008 11:13:32 PM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: blam

Just a suggestion. Don’t forget the demon seed.

Send the Clintons down there...


3 posted on 01/26/2008 11:17:16 PM PST by DoughtyOne (< fence >< sound immigration policies >< /weasles >< /RINOs >< /Reagan wannabees that are liberal >)
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To: blam

Sounds like a good idea.


4 posted on 01/26/2008 11:19:48 PM PST by Anti-Bubba182
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To: blam

a pretty rational idea, actually, if government workers didnt actually get to plan the facility itself.


5 posted on 01/26/2008 11:35:16 PM PST by WoofDog123
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To: blam

I assume this group of scientists does not believe in global warming.


6 posted on 01/26/2008 11:35:17 PM PST by Mind-numbed Robot (Not all that needs to be done, needs to be done by the government.)
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To: Mind-numbed Robot

Great point. Love it.


7 posted on 01/27/2008 12:00:38 AM PST by Picklezz (Congressman HUNTER, many of us were counting on you being our President and saving America.)
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To: blam

...do you get the idea that they know something we don’t? Is there an asteroid headed our way or something?


8 posted on 01/27/2008 12:10:21 AM PST by americanophile
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To: Mind-numbed Robot
I assume this group of scientists does not believe in global warming.

No, they believe in climate change. Global warming is passe at this point. Get with it, man.

With coming climatic changes, higher food prices, and expanding markets for biofuels, our best available options for progress, if not survival, will be in what we have conserved and studied against all thinkable predictions.”

9 posted on 01/27/2008 12:23:04 AM PST by Bob
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To: blam

Why? If globle warming and hilary care is going to destroy us all, what the hell do we seeds for?


10 posted on 01/27/2008 2:11:27 AM PST by Waco
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To: americanophile
Is there an asteroid headed our way or something?

Statistically speaking, yes, there are asteroid strikes in our planet's future.

11 posted on 01/27/2008 4:34:35 AM PST by woofer (Earth First! We'll mine the other eight later.)
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To: blam

But did they gather any Wildwood Weed seeds?

All good things gotta come to an end,
And it’s the same with the wildwood weed.
One day this feller from Washington came by,
And he spied it and turned white as a sheet.
Then they dug and they burned,
And they burned and they dug,
And they killed all our cute little weeds.
Then they drove away,
We just smiled and waved ..........
Sittin’ there on that sack of seeds!


12 posted on 01/27/2008 5:39:06 AM PST by mtbopfuyn (I think the border is kind of an artificial barrier - San Antonio councilwoman Patti Radle)
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To: Waco
"Why? If globle warming and hilary care is going to destroy us all, what the hell do we seeds for?"

Hopefully so that we won't have to go back through the 'hunter-gatherer' stage again.

Toba

"Genetic evidence suggests that Human population size fell to about 10,000 adults between 50 and 100 thousand years ago."

13 posted on 01/27/2008 7:35:46 AM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: blam; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 24Karet; 3AngelaD; 49th; ...

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·

 
Gods
Graves
Glyphs
Thanks Blam.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are Blam, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

· Google · Archaeologica · ArchaeoBlog · Archaeology magazine · Biblical Archaeology Society ·
· Mirabilis · Texas AM Anthropology News · Yahoo Anthro & Archaeo ·
· History or Science & Nature Podcasts · Excerpt, or Link only? · cgk's list of ping lists ·


14 posted on 01/28/2008 12:03:16 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/__________________Profile updated Wednesday, January 16, 2008)
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To: blam
I hope that somebody thinks to put a supply of topsoil in there, too. You just never know what the future holds.

I'd hate to see some "Twilight Zone" ending to this where the Brave New World has all the seed it needs, but no soil to grow it in.

-PJ

15 posted on 01/28/2008 12:06:00 PM PST by Political Junkie Too (Repeal the 17th amendment -- it's the "Fairness Doctrine" for Congress!)
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To: americanophile

It’s just a matter of time that we get smacked real hard.


16 posted on 01/28/2008 12:07:37 PM PST by ASA Vet
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To: Political Junkie Too
"I'd hate to see some "Twilight Zone" ending to this where the Brave New World has all the seed it needs, but no soil to grow it in."

No-one that will know where the seeds are will survive anyway.

For example: Pick any 100 people in every city in the world...I expect not one will even know there is a seed vault much less where it's located.

BTW, I have my own seed, fertlizer and pesticide vault.

17 posted on 01/28/2008 2:48:50 PM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: blam

Ah, but the mighty Goracle, who is wise beyond measure, says that the seeds will be flooded out soon. (sarcasm -for the record)


18 posted on 01/28/2008 5:52:50 PM PST by rdl6989
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To: americanophile

Maybe Yellowstone really is gonna explode?


19 posted on 01/28/2008 8:54:11 PM PST by Shadowstrike (Be polite, Be professional, but have a plan to kill everyone you meet.)
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To: blam

I am really glad that seeds that are not artificially, genetically altered are being protected somewhere.


20 posted on 02/04/2008 9:55:09 PM PST by Bellflower (A Brand New Day Is Coming!)
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To: Bittersweetmd

ping


21 posted on 02/06/2008 3:12:06 PM PST by Bellflower (A Brand New Day Is Coming!)
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To: blam

I want a pesticide vault.


22 posted on 02/06/2008 3:15:33 PM PST by Cold Heart
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To: blam

I can’t remember which as I watch both a lot but either the History Channel or the National Geographic channel just recently had a one hour program about this place and the why and whats. Very interesting show.


23 posted on 02/06/2008 3:33:59 PM PST by fish hawk (The religion of Darwinism = Monkey Intellect)
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To: blam
Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East

Only Turd world seeds need apply?

24 posted on 02/06/2008 3:45:27 PM PST by Malsua
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To: blam; Gabz; gardengirl; girlangler

Thanks for posting this, Blam.

I’m often accused of being a “Crunchy Con” because while I’m totally Conservative, I’m also considered by some to be kind of a “Hippie” because I keep an organic garden and orchard on my farm, live simply, work close to home in a sector that I LOVE (Garden Center), etc. I also have seven years of working for The Seed Savers Exchange under my belt. Pretty good for a Conservative, wouldn’t you say? LOL! SSE keeps a seed vault in IA, as well. I think there’s a government seed vault in CO, too.

BUT...this is VERY serious, FRiends. When the seeds are gone, so is the FOOD.

http://www.seedsavers.org


25 posted on 02/06/2008 3:47:16 PM PST by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
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To: Diana in Wisconsin

Kinda alarmed here.


26 posted on 02/06/2008 3:52:00 PM PST by txhurl (Martial Law '08)
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To: Political Junkie Too

"All the Time in the World." :)

27 posted on 02/06/2008 3:52:22 PM PST by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
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To: txflake

“Kinda alarmed here.”

At me, or the seed vaults? ;)


28 posted on 02/06/2008 3:55:53 PM PST by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
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To: Political Junkie Too
I'd hate to see some "Twilight Zone" ending to this where the Brave New World has all the seed it needs, but no soil to grow it in.

That's funny, I was thinking of something similar. In my scenario, it's a hungry future Magellan who stumbles across the cave and finds a nice snack to go with his fish dinner.

Better add some pictographic instructions/explanations, too.

29 posted on 02/06/2008 3:57:55 PM PST by timm22 (Think critically)
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To: Diana in Wisconsin
"At me, or the seed vaults? ;)"

LOL.

30 posted on 02/06/2008 5:03:30 PM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: Diana in Wisconsin
" When the seeds are gone, so is the FOOD."

I remember an incident some decades when we sent seed grain to India (I think) and hunger was so bad there that they ate the seeds...problem was, the seeds had already been coated with a poison. Many died.

31 posted on 02/06/2008 5:07:43 PM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: Picklezz

This is all being done so that the surviving New World Order elitists will be able to eat old fashioned home grown tomatoes.


32 posted on 02/06/2008 5:12:24 PM PST by nygoose
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To: blam

A few years back my Eco-SIL (her HEART is in the right place, her BRAIN is elsewhere) tried to talk our FIL into sending a goat to a Third World country or some such thing. I think it’s called “The Heifer Project?”

We all pool our money at Christmas and do something “charitable” and the family takes a vote on where to send our cash, but Dad has the final say in it.

His tirade on “they’ll just EAT it, they don’t know what to DO to CREATE food for themselves, they’ll just kill the Golden Goose, etc.” is now our Christmastime mantra. ;)

He DOES have a point. I’m a “Teach a man to fish,” Gal, myself.

But, when you’re starving due to tin-pot dictators taking the cream, where does your thinking lie?

Democracy for all! No matter how cr@ppy it may seem at times. No one is “starving” in the Good Old USofA, that’s for sure. Democracy for all! Seeds for all! :)


33 posted on 02/06/2008 6:37:58 PM PST by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
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To: blam

What I wanna know is if I have a bag of beans, say like pinto beans or red beans in my pantry, if I soak a handful in the spring and throw them in the ground, will I get like, you know, bean PLANTS?

I mean I can buy a one pound bag of beans for about the same as a paltry seed packet that has 17 bean seeds.

Just wonderin.


34 posted on 02/06/2008 6:41:53 PM PST by djf (...and dying in your bed, many years from now, did you donate to FR?)
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To: Diana in Wisconsin; blam; gardengirl; girlangler; SunkenCiv; HungarianGypsy; Gabz; billhilly; ...

Gardening PING!

Great find, blam!!!!


35 posted on 02/06/2008 6:46:29 PM PST by Gabz (Don't tell my mom I'm a lobbyist, she thinks I'm a piano player in a whorehouse)
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To: djf
"What I wanna know is if I have a bag of beans, say like pinto beans or red beans in my pantry, if I soak a handful in the spring and throw them in the ground, will I get like, you know, bean PLANTS?"

Usually. Not many will sprout as compared to the seed packet though.

36 posted on 02/06/2008 6:55:11 PM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: blam

Hope they include some beer recipes.


37 posted on 02/06/2008 6:58:10 PM PST by P.O.E. (Thank God for every morning.)
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To: djf

“What I wanna know is if I have a bag of beans, say like pinto beans or red beans in my pantry, if I soak a handful in the spring and throw them in the ground, will I get like, you know, bean PLANTS?”

Yes, you will. But not all will germinate (sprout) due to age and other factors. Food beans are handled differently than beans for sewing in the following season. Bean seeds lose their germination rate quickly. The larger the seed, the shorter its shelf-life. (For example, lettuce and radish seed are really small...they have a longer “viability” than do a bean seed or a corn kernel seed. The smaller the seed, the longer it “lasts.”)

If you’ve ever grown beans for the dry beans (seeds) you need ACRES to fill that bag-o-beans that you buy for $1 at The Dollar Store. An average garden plot won’t produce the quantity needed unless you have a 1/4 acre or so to devote only to dry beans. Each pod produces 4-5 seeds (beans.) Each plant produces 12-20 or so pods holding 4-5 bean seeds. You do the math...and don’t get me started on what a PITA it is to harvest and shell them. How dried beans EVER became the food staple of starving, Third World countries is beyond me. The labor ALONE in ‘beans and rice’ boggles the mind.

Learn to hunt, Dudes! ;)

And then, as another consideration, some of your bagged beans may be bush beans and some may be pole beans. Pole beans are MUCH more productive and you can grow a lot more on less land as they grow UP with proper supports.

If you’re really willing to try growing drying beans this upcoming season, I’d say...don’t do it! No matter WHAT your politics, hit The Dollar Store and buy yourself a bag-o-beans for a dollar.

Believe me, I’ve done many test plots for drying beans over the years...it’s a fruitless effort. And I’m STILL hungry at the end of the day. I just don’t GET it!


38 posted on 02/06/2008 7:06:14 PM PST by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
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To: djf
"I mean I can buy a one pound bag of beans for about the same as a paltry seed packet that has 17 bean seeds."

It will work, but the percentage that will actually germinate is low. You will get near 100% with a seed packet. Even saving packet seeds from year-to-year you will get a drop off, unless you keep them under tightly controlled conditions. I have kept them several years in a vacuum sealed jar in the freezer.

39 posted on 02/06/2008 7:06:57 PM PST by JustaDumbBlonde (Laissez les bons temps roule!)
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To: Gabz

Thanks for the ping. Good article.


40 posted on 02/06/2008 7:08:00 PM PST by JustaDumbBlonde (Laissez les bons temps roule!)
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To: blam

Control the world’s food supply and you control the world.


41 posted on 02/06/2008 7:08:02 PM PST by metmom (Welfare was never meant to be a career choice.)
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To: woofer

What if it hits the vault?


42 posted on 02/06/2008 7:09:06 PM PST by metmom (Welfare was never meant to be a career choice.)
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To: Gabz

That’s a pretty interesting article. Thanks for the PING.


43 posted on 02/06/2008 7:38:40 PM PST by hedgetrimmer (I'm a billionaire! Thanks WTO and the "free trade" system!--Hu Jintao top 10 worst dictators)
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To: Diana in Wisconsin; Gabz

Excellent information DIW !

We have never tried to grow pintos......a person has to know their limitations......:o)

Stay saf Ya’ll !


44 posted on 02/06/2008 8:01:42 PM PST by Squantos (Be polite. Be professional. But, have a plan to kill everyone you meet. )
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To: blam

Very interesting article. I hope the U.S. government does something similar.

I actually have some wheat seed in my freezer “just in case”, along with some other seeds. I’m also learning more about how to save seeds from veggies in my garden. Yep, I’m a paranoid head case, but it never hurts to be prepared right? At least, that’s what I tell myself :)

Plus, I love to garden, and still find it amazing that life is hidden inside a tiny seed. I have started buying some heirloom seed varieties. While hybrid seeds produce high quality fruits and veggies, seed saved from these can be sterile or not be true to the parent plant.

Here’s a site with some information on seed saving, if anyone’s interested:

http://www.seedsave.org/issi/issi_904.html


45 posted on 02/06/2008 8:46:53 PM PST by chickpundit (This chick's STILL for Fred)
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To: Gabz

Very interesting. Thanks Gabz.


46 posted on 02/06/2008 8:49:35 PM PST by chickpundit (This chick's STILL for Fred)
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To: blam

Great article,Blam. Stuff like this is always interesting. My question is—if the seeds are in Norway,what good are they going to do most of the world in case of a disaster?! Can’t plant what you can’t get to. As someone else mentioned, how many people would know about this?

I have this nightmare scenario of all these starving people. Someone finds the seeds, and it’s some dumbass whos never planted a garden, couldn’t keep a silk flower alive. So then the finder does this really stupid thing, like scattering the seeds to the four winds in the dead of winter. LOL Too much imagination.


47 posted on 02/06/2008 9:30:42 PM PST by gardengirl
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To: Diana in Wisconsin

Most people truly have no idea how important seeds are. Run out—just go down to the store and buy more. What happens when the store can’t get seeds? Saving seeds is great, but it won’t work with hybrids, and it’s nearly impossible to save seeds in a climate like mine. Hot and humid will do them in in a heart beat. And yes, you can freeze seeds, but if there’s no power...

Doomed. We’re doomed, I tell ya. S/o


48 posted on 02/06/2008 9:35:55 PM PST by gardengirl
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To: Gabz

Blam is outstanding in his field.


49 posted on 02/06/2008 10:26:41 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/__________________Profile updated Wednesday, January 16, 2008)
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To: nygoose

Well now, won’t they be surprised?


50 posted on 02/07/2008 2:36:04 AM PST by Picklezz (Congressman HUNTER, many of us were counting on you being our President and saving America.)
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