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Ingredient In Yellow Curry Can Reduce Heart Enlargement And May Prevent Heart Failure
Science Daily ^ | 2-22-2008 | University Health Network

Posted on 02/22/2008 11:19:18 AM PST by blam

Ingredient In Yellow Curry Can Reduce Heart Enlargement And May Prevent Heart Failure

Turmeric. Eating curcumin, a natural ingredient in the spice turmeric, may dramatically reduce the chance of developing heart failure. (Credit: iStockphoto/Nilesh Bhange)

ScienceDaily (Feb. 22, 2008) — Eating curcumin, a natural ingredient in the spice turmeric, may dramatically reduce the chance of developing heart failure, researchers at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre of the Toronto General Hospital have discovered.

In a study entitled, “Curcumin prevents and reverses murine cardiac hypertrophy,” published in the February edition of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers found when the herb is given orally to a variety of mouse models with enlarged hearts (hypertrophy), it can prevent and reverse hypertrophy, restore heart function and reduce scar formation.

The healing properties of turmeric have been well known in eastern cultures for some time. The herb has been used in traditional Indian and Chinese medicine to reduce scar formation. For example, when there is a cut or a bruise, the home remedy is to reach for turmeric powder because it can help to heal without leaving a bad scar.

Unlike most natural compounds whose effects are minimal, curcumin works directly in the cell nucleus by preventing abnormal unraveling of the chromosome under stress, and preventing excessive abnormal protein production.

“Curcumin’s ability to shut off one of the major switches right at the chromosome source where the enlargement and scarring genes are being turned on is impressive,” says Dr. Peter Liu, cardiologist in the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre and Scientific Director at the Canadian Institutes of Health Research – Institute of Circulatory and Respiratory Health. However Dr. Liu cautions that moderation is important, “the beneficial effects of curcumin are not strengthened by eating more of it.”

Dr. Liu, who holds the Heart and Stroke Foundation’s Polo Chair Professor in Medicine and Physiology at the University of Toronto, says that since curcumin is a naturally occurring compound that is readily available at a low cost, it might be a safe and effective means of preventing heart failure in the future.

“Whether you are young or old; male or female; the larger your heart is, the higher your risk is for developing heart attacks or heart failure in the future. However, until clinical trials are done, we don’t recommend patients to take curcumin routinely. You are better off to take action today by lowering blood pressure, reducing cholesterol, exercising and healthy eating,” says Dr. Liu.

If clinical trials of curcumin support initial findings of heart enlargement prevention, it may offer hope for millions of patients with heart enlargement in a relatively safe and inexpensive manner. Curcumin-based treatments are currently in clinical trials for pancreatic and colorectal cancer patients with promising results.

This study was funded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Adapted from materials provided by University Health Network, via Newswise.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: curcumin; curry; elargement; heart; india; turmeric; yellow
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1 posted on 02/22/2008 11:19:19 AM PST by blam
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To: blam

Who swallowed the ‘Ing’ ?


2 posted on 02/22/2008 11:21:20 AM PST by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
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To: blam

And by the way, there is no such thing as “yellow” curry.

There are curries made primarily of turmeric, though.

‘Curry’ is a generic term.


3 posted on 02/22/2008 11:22:32 AM PST by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
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To: blam

Panang !


4 posted on 02/22/2008 11:23:09 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (ENERGY CRISIS made in Washington D. C.)
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To: blam
I do believe that is one of the key ingredients in Indian rice and other foods?

If so I’m off to the Bombay Bistro for supper tonight.

5 posted on 02/22/2008 11:24:29 AM PST by PeteB570 (NRA - Life member and Black Rifle owner)
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To: PeteB570
My dad got hooked on firey curries when stationed in the CBI. I think I inherited it.
6 posted on 02/22/2008 11:26:45 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (ENERGY CRISIS made in Washington D. C.)
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To: CarrotAndStick

Curry?

That is like trying to get a handle on “Chutney”.

Ask and you get “What kind and from where.” :-)


7 posted on 02/22/2008 11:26:54 AM PST by PeteB570 (NRA - Life member and Black Rifle owner)
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To: blam

any recipes???..trot...trot...trot


8 posted on 02/22/2008 11:27:10 AM PST by gitmogrunt
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To: PeteB570

“I do believe that is one of the key ingredients in Indian rice and other foods?”

Yes, it is. Also used as an antiseptic on surface wounds in traditional Indian medicine.


9 posted on 02/22/2008 11:27:27 AM PST by indcons
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To: blam

So what!? What can they do for a “heartless conservative” like me? Or should I say...a party(Republicans)that have lost all thier heart?


10 posted on 02/22/2008 11:30:20 AM PST by albie
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To: blam

Lamb curry
2 lbs sliced or cubed lamb
2 T flour
2 T oil
5 potatoes, slightly microwaved and chopped
1 onion, chopped
3T curry powder
1 1/2 C water
2 tsp chicken bouillon
1 C cold water well mixed with 1/2 C flour
Coat lamb pieces in flour, brown in oil in large skillet. Remove from pan. Add additional oil if necessary and slightly brown onion and potatoes. Add curry powder. Add water and bouillon. Simmer for 90 minutes. During last 10 minutes, add flour-water mixture to thicken.
Serve over rice (basmati rice is best)


11 posted on 02/22/2008 11:32:18 AM PST by jwalburg (Gullible warming protesters are self-extinguishing)
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To: blam
Turmeric is a prime ingredient
in Worcestershire sauce.

12 posted on 02/22/2008 11:34:16 AM PST by evets (beer)
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To: jwalburg

Nice recipe. I’m always trying to sneak turmeric into dinner, but I really don’t love the stuff. May end up buying in capsules at the health food store.


13 posted on 02/22/2008 11:35:21 AM PST by Veto! (Opinions freely dispensed as advice)
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To: jwalburg

Lamb curry, anyone?

14 posted on 02/22/2008 11:36:07 AM PST by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
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To: CarrotAndStick

Mmmmmmm.


15 posted on 02/22/2008 11:37:55 AM PST by jwalburg (Gullible warming protesters are self-extinguishing)
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To: blam

OOH! I can’t wait to have some curried rice now!.....


16 posted on 02/22/2008 11:37:56 AM PST by Red Badger ( We don't have science, but we do have consensus.......)
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To: blam; pandoraou812

Turmeric. A well known anti-inflammatory. It also has the property of tightening loose tendons and loosening tight tendons.


17 posted on 02/22/2008 11:38:14 AM PST by TigersEye (This is the age of the death of reason.)
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To: blam

I’ve read it can help prevent Melanoma.


18 posted on 02/22/2008 11:38:50 AM PST by diamond6 (Everyone who is for abortion has been born. Ronald Reagan)
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To: Pride in the USA

Eat more Indian food-—it’s good for your heart.


19 posted on 02/22/2008 11:39:35 AM PST by lonevoice (John McCain was a Kinoki foot pad in the Reagan Revolution)
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To: Veto!

“capsules”
I was just wonderin’ about that! Because of acid reflux, I have to stay away from spicy food. But I’m thinkin’ that the capsules might be just as bad. Wonder if they have an “enteric” brand of caps anywhere.


20 posted on 02/22/2008 11:40:18 AM PST by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ("Don't touch that thing")
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To: ejo

Have a look.


21 posted on 02/22/2008 11:40:39 AM PST by dbwz (kthxbai)
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To: Cacique

Turmeric ping!


22 posted on 02/22/2008 11:43:11 AM PST by Clemenza (I live in New Jersey for the Same Reason People Slow Down to Look at Car Wrecks)
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To: blam
Mmm, yellow curry...
23 posted on 02/22/2008 11:43:49 AM PST by JasonC
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To: blam

If you happen to develop a taste for Indian pickles, they are loaded with all this good stuff. They do go well with American food, imo.


24 posted on 02/22/2008 11:44:05 AM PST by swarthyguy (Osama Freedom Day: 2500 or so since September 11 2001!)
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To: diamond6
"I’ve read it can help prevent Melanoma."

Yup. Me too... and alzheimer's.

25 posted on 02/22/2008 11:44:48 AM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: JasonC
"Mmm, yellow curry..."

Curry is the most popular dish in the UK presently.

26 posted on 02/22/2008 11:45:56 AM PST by blam (Secure the border and enforce the law)
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To: blam
I take it every day. The big problem with Curcumin is that it is very poorly absorbed. There is a new product that handles the bioavailability problem. www.lef.org.

I understand that most of the major pharma companies are frantically working to come up with a patentable version of the active molecule. The same is true for the grape extract, resveratrol. The human and animal test results for these two herbs are quite remarkable.

27 posted on 02/22/2008 11:46:21 AM PST by ModelBreaker
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To: evets

I think you might be thinking of tamarind.


28 posted on 02/22/2008 11:46:31 AM PST by Rte66
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To: lonevoice
Eat more Indian food-—it’s good for your heart.

Gotta be careful with that advice. What is commonly sold as Indian food in restaurants is usually Mughal fare, a form of cuisine once consumed by royalty, especially ones who were physically active. Average Indian food is not as rich:


29 posted on 02/22/2008 11:48:30 AM PST by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
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To: CarrotAndStick

We live near at least three Indian buffets (for lunch). We LOVE this food!


30 posted on 02/22/2008 11:58:56 AM PST by twigs
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To: Bellflower

ping!


31 posted on 02/22/2008 12:01:48 PM PST by sjeann
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To: Clemenza

Turmeric has also been linked to the prvention of Alzheimer’s. Indians have one of the lowest incidences of Alzheimer’s and that has been linked to the use of Turmeric in their diet.


32 posted on 02/22/2008 12:07:51 PM PST by Cacique (quos Deus vult perdere, prius dementat ( Islamia Delenda Est ))
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To: Cacique

I’ve been taking Tumeric 500mg for months for the curcuminoids (anti0xidants), who knew?


33 posted on 02/22/2008 12:25:23 PM PST by traderrob6
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To: Rte66
Yeah, tamarind Hic... that's what I meant... thanks!

34 posted on 02/22/2008 12:31:58 PM PST by evets (beer)
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To: gitmogrunt
any recipes???..trot...trot...trot

There's a recipe for turmeric tea at this guy's web site: www.iskcon.net.au/kurma/2008/01/11. It sounds pretty weird. I'll have to try it and see if the ginger and maple syrup tame the turmeric and lemon juice.

35 posted on 02/22/2008 12:40:36 PM PST by snarkpup ("I'm not a nerd. I'm a specialist." - Sousuke Sagara)
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To: evets

Tamarind fruit comes in seed pods that look like big castor beans. They're kind of like dates, I would think (I don't eat dates, so not sure, taste-wise.)

When I want to use it for something, I buy a puree or paste of it in frozen concentrated form at the grocery. I've had a drink of it in Mexico and in the Caribbean, which is why I think they have this concentrate here in Houston.

I really never thought of it being in Worcestershire sauce until you brought it up! And I can drink W'shire by the gallon, lol.

36 posted on 02/22/2008 1:07:27 PM PST by Rte66
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To: blam

Bump


37 posted on 02/22/2008 1:10:13 PM PST by Fiddlstix (Warning! This Is A Subliminal Tagline! Read it at your own risk!(Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: blam

Well, ugh! I did that turmeric thing I found online by other FReepers’ recommendation, in trying to cure the recurring rash I have/had on the tops of my hands.

Bleeccch! It said to drink 1 Tbsp in a glass of water, every so many hours or several times per day. Aaacck, I can still taste it!

It was CLAY, like you would make a mud mask out of for your face! And it tasted like dirt - BAD dirt. Or burning plastic! Not only that, it didn’t work - and I endured that grossness for at least a month, I was so desperate.

I eat curry all the time - at least several times per week - and love it. So I am ingesting turmeric in small amounts, anyway, but never again with the “intense turmeric therapy”! Ptooey! *spit spit*


38 posted on 02/22/2008 1:13:52 PM PST by Rte66
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To: TigersEye

Thanks, its going in my saved file.


39 posted on 02/22/2008 1:35:44 PM PST by pandoraou812 (Out, damned spot......OUT)
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To: TigersEye

I’ve found that turmeric supplements help my arthritis significantly.


40 posted on 02/22/2008 2:26:52 PM PST by Oldhunk
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To: Oldhunk
Excellent! I encourage my mother to use it for her arthritis too. An old Ayurvedic recipe is to mix one teaspoon powdered turmeric, one tsp of almond oil (they usually use Ghee which is clarified butter) in a cup of warm milk. I find it to be pretty tasty and the warmed milk has tryptophan in it, like turkey, which helps make you sleepy so I tell her to take it right before bedtime.

The almond oil or Ghee is supposed to take the turmeric deeper into body tissues. That makes sense because the lumen (intestinal lining) takes fats directly into the blood stream.

41 posted on 02/22/2008 3:06:45 PM PST by TigersEye (This is the age of the death of reason.)
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To: Rte66
You might try burdock root for that rash. It works on immunoglobulin E mediated allergies. (Please don't ask me to explain that. I just know burdock root works and some skin conditions fit that profile.)

The Japanese eat burdock root, they call it Gobo, but you might not be able to find any fresh root for sale unless you can get to an Asian market.

In the spring and summer you can dig all you want. There are few places where it doesn't grow. Most of it will be tough though unless you find young plants in rich soil. But it is commonly sold as an herbal tincture in "progressive" stores that sell a lot of such "supplements."

42 posted on 02/22/2008 3:16:49 PM PST by TigersEye (This is the age of the death of reason.)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

There’s a great little Vietnamese place here in STL that has a squid curry that I crave. Fortunately it’s inexpensive so I can indulge myself at least weekly(and I do). I inherited my taste for curries from my parents too.


43 posted on 02/22/2008 3:35:28 PM PST by Uriah_lost (This space closed for a respectful mourning period...)
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To: traderrob6

Where do you get it? I have a lot of inflammation and also heart problems.


44 posted on 02/22/2008 3:41:54 PM PST by Marysecretary (GOD IS STILL IN CONTROL.)
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To: ModelBreaker

What are the benefits of grape extract, resveratrol?


45 posted on 02/22/2008 3:43:58 PM PST by diamond6 (Everyone who is for abortion has been born. Ronald Reagan)
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To: Marysecretary

I get mine from SwansonsVitamins.com
In the search box, type Curcumin Complex or SWH084


46 posted on 02/22/2008 4:17:12 PM PST by ncpatriot
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To: blam

I prefer the mild curry: Japanese or Irish style, too hot: Pakistani curry./Just Asking - seoul62.......


47 posted on 02/22/2008 4:22:13 PM PST by seoul62
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To: diamond6

“What are the benefits of grape extract, resveratrol?”

Try a glass of Red wine 4-6 oz/day. A lot of the research that’s been done actually shows that the alcohol is as or even more important than the (Resveratrol) flavonoids.


48 posted on 02/22/2008 4:25:23 PM PST by traderrob6
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To: Uriah_lost
When I was a kid, my mom and I visited Thailand in the 1950s. At our hotel, mom ordered Pud Thai, the nation dish of Thailand. It came with stir fried honeybees.
49 posted on 02/22/2008 4:34:53 PM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (ENERGY CRISIS made in Washington D. C.)
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To: Rte66

“I really never thought of it being in Worcestershire sauce until you brought it up! And I can drink W’shire by the gallon, lol.”

Hope that’s LOW SODIUM wocestershire sauce. The sodium will make your blood pressure rise, don’t know that the turmeric properties will take care of that.


50 posted on 02/22/2008 4:41:35 PM PST by swmobuffalo ("We didn't seek the approval of Code Pink and MoveOn.org before deciding what to do")
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