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First Sioux to Receive Medal of Honor
Military.com/Army News Service ^ | February 23, 2008 | Carrie McLeroy

Posted on 02/27/2008 5:29:51 AM PST by 2ndDivisionVet

WASHINGTON - During the final allied offensive of the Korean War, Master Sgt. Woodrow Wilson Keeble risked his life to save his fellow Soldiers. Almost six decades after his gallant actions and 26 years after his death, Keeble will be the first full-blooded Sioux Indian to receive the Medal of Honor.

The White House announced this morning that Keeble will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously in a ceremony scheduled for 2:30 p.m. March 3.

Keeble is one of the most decorated Soldiers in North Dakota history. A veteran of World War II and the Korean War, he was born in 1917 in Waubay, S.D., on the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Reservation, which extended into North Dakota. He spent most of his life in the Wahpeton, N.D. area, where he attended an Indian school. In 1942 Keeble joined the North Dakota National Guard, and in October that year, found himself embroiled in some of the fiercest hand-to-hand combat of World War II on Guadalcanal.

Guadalcanal

"Guadalcanal seemed to be on his mind a lot," Russell Hawkins, Keeble's stepson, said. "His fellow Soldiers said he had to fight a lot of hand-to-hand fights with the Japanese, so he saw their faces. Every now and then he would get a far-away look in his eyes, and I knew he was thinking about those men and the things he had to do." At Henderson Field on the South Pacific Island, Keeble served with Company I, 164th Infantry - the first Army unit on Guadalcanal.

"I heard stories from James Fenelon, who served with him there, and he would talk about how the men of the 164th rallied around this full-blooded Sioux Indian whose accuracy with the Brown Automatic Rifle was unparalleled," Hawkins said. "It was said he would go in front of patrols and kill enemies before his unit would get there."

The Sioux have a word for that kind of bravery, according to Hawkins - wowaditaka. "It means don't be afraid of anything, be braver than that which scares you the most." Keeble personified the word according to fellow Soldiers, and earned the first of four Purple Hearts and his first Bronze Star for his actions on Guadalcanal.

Korea

Keeble answered the call to arms again when war broke out in Korea. He was a seasoned, 34-year-old master sergeant serving with 1st Platoon, Company G, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Division.

According to eyewitness accounts, while serving as the acting platoon leader of 1st Plt. in the vicinity of the Kumsong River, North Korea, on or about Oct. 15. 1951, Keeble voluntarily took on the responsibility of leading not only his platoon, but the 2nd and 3rd Platoons as well.

In an official statement 1st Sgt. Kosumo "Joe" Sagami of Co. G said, "All the officers of the company had received disabling wounds or were killed in action, except one platoon leader who assumed command of the company." The company's mission was to take control of a steep, rocky, heavily fortified hill.

Hawkins recalled how the man everyone knew as "Woody," described the terrain. "We were driving through Colorado on a trip, and Woody was pointing at something out the window," Hawkins said. By that time, Keeble had suffered seven debilitating strokes and lost the ability to speak.

"I pulled over and realized he was pointing at a large, rocky cliff with an almost sheer drop. I asked Woody if that was what it was like during that battle in Korea and he nodded, 'yes,'" Hawkins said. "It wasn't quite a straight drop down, but you could get up the hill faster on your hands and knees than on your feet."

Sagami wrote that Keeble led all three platoons in successive assaults upon the Chinese who held the hill throughout the day. All three charges were repulsed, and the company suffered heavy casualties. Trenches filled with enemy soldiers, and fortified by three pillboxes containing machine guns and additional men surrounded the hill.

Following the third assault and subsequent mortar and artillery support, the enemy sustained casualties among its ranks in the open trenches. The machine gunners in the pillboxes however, continued to direct fire on the company. Sagami said after Keeble withdrew the 3rd platoon, he decided to attempt a solo assault.

"He once told a relative that the fourth attempt he was either going to take them out or die trying," Hawkins said.

"Woody used to tell people he was more concerned about losing his men than about losing his own life," he added. "He pushed his own life to the limit. He wasn't willing to put his fellow Soldiers' lives on the line."

Armed with grenades and his Browning Automatic Rifle, Keeble crawled to an area 50 yards from the ridgeline, flanked the left pillbox and used grenades and rifle fire to eliminate it, according to Sagami. After returning to the point where 1st Platoon held the company's first line of defense, Keeble worked his way to the opposite side of the ridgeline and took out the right pillbox with grenades. "Then without hesitation, he lobbed a grenade into the back entrance of the middle pillbox and with additional rifle fire eliminated it," Sagami added.

Hawkins said one eyewitness told him the enemy directed its entire arsenal at Keeble during his assault. "He said there were so many grenades coming down on Woody, that it looked like a flock of blackbirds." Even under heavy enemy fire, Keeble was able to complete his objective. Only after he killed the machine gunners did Keeble order his men to advance and secure the hill.

"When I first started hearing these stories I was amazed that a man of Woody's size (more than six feet tall and 235-plus pounds), could sneak up on the enemy without being noticed," Hawkins said. "So one day, I was out helping him mow the lawn, and I asked him how he did it. He just shrugged his shoulders.

"I joked with him and told him those soldiers must have been blind or old or something, because he would never be able to sneak up on a young guy like me." Hawkins said he continued to mow then was startled when Woody popped up from behind some bushes near him. "He could have reached out and grabbed me by the ankles, and I didn't even know he was there!" Keeble had slid on his back behind the brush. Although Hawkins was not positive, he believed Keeble might have used a similar maneuver when attacking the pillboxes.

Keeble's selfless acts on that rugged terrain in 1951 did not come without a price. According to Sagami and other eyewitnesses, he was wounded on at least five different occasions by fragmentation and concussion grenades. "His wounds were apparent in the chest, both arms, right calf, knee and right thigh and left thigh." Sagami cited blood at the wound locations as evidence.

Hawkins said 83 grenade fragments were removed from Keeble's body, but several others remained. "You could tell that the wounds bothered him sometimes, but he never complained."

Sagami wrote in his statement that Keeble did not complain on the battlefield either. "At no time did he allow himself to be evacuated during the course of the day. Only after the unit was in defensive positions for the night did he allow himself to be evacuated."

According to Hawkins, every surviving member of Co. G signed a letter recommending Keeble for the Medal of Honor on two separate occasions, once in November 1951 and then again in December that same year. On both instances, the paperwork was lost. Keeble was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross Dec. 20, 1952 for his actions in Korea, not the Medal of Honor his men believed he deserved. He also earned the Purple Heart (First Oak Leaf Cluster); Bronze Star (First Oak Leaf Cluster); and the Silver Star as a result of his heroics throughout his tour in Korea. He was honorably discharged March 1, 1953.

Life after the Army

Even after his discharge, Keeble never severed his ties with the Army, Hawkins said, and was a champion for veterans and their causes. "He was always going to different veterans events and he supported the Disabled American Veterans organization. He would wear his uniform in parades, and was the first in line for any type of fundraiser."

Though Keeble knew of his unit's failed attempts to award him the Medal of Honor, Hawkins said he never sensed any bitterness from him. "Whenever someone would bring it up, he just shrugged. He wasn't there to get medals; he was there for his men and his country. He enjoyed the small things in life, and concentrated on what he had, not what he didn't have."

Those who didn't know Keeble the Soldier saw him as a kind-hearted, gentle man full of humility, according to Hawkins. "Woody was a very upbeat person. If you didn't know his war record, you'd think he was just a happy-go-lucky guy. His glass was always half full, never half empty."

In later years, Keeble fell on hard times and was forced to pawn all his medals. He had one lung removed, and in the months and years following the surgery suffered more than a half dozen strokes that Hawkins said eventually left him speechless. "But his mind remained sharp, and he was the same man inside."

Keeble's family was presented with a duplicate set of medals in May 2006, and they, along with his uniform and other memorabilia, are housed at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks.

Long Road to Medal of Honor

The family's battle to upgrade Keeble's Distinguished Service Cross to the Medal of Honor began in 1972, when both Woody and his wife, Dr. Blossom Hawkins-Keeble, were still alive. According to Hawkins, the family unknowingly started off in the wrong direction. "We thought the paperwork had been lost, but were unaware that it no longer existed. It didn't just get lost on the battlefield, it never made it off the battlefield." When the family finally realized this fact, they sought the support of the Sisseton-Wahpeton tribe and gathered recorded statements from the men who served with Keeble.

The team soon learned that since the statute of limitations for awarding the Medal of Honor was three years from the date of the heroic action, it would literally take, "An Act of Congress," to realize the goal. Beginning in 2002, the tribe involved senators and representatives from North and South Dakota. Armed with written evidence, eyewitness accounts and letters from four senators supporting the effort, tribe officials contacted the Army, which reviewed the evidence and concluded Keeble's actions were worthy of the medal. Finally, on March 23, 2007, North Dakota Senator Byron Dorgan introduced a bill, cosponsored by Senators Kent Conrad (ND), Tim Johnson (SD) and John Thune (SD), authorizing the president, "To award the Medal of Honor to Woodrow W. Keeble for his acts of valor during the Korean conflict." Congress passed the bill in early December 2007.

Hawkins will represent Keeble in a White House ceremony March 3, where he will accept the Medal of Honor on his behalf.

"We are just proud to be a part of this for Woody," Hawkins said. "He is deserving of this, for what he did in the Armed Services in defense of this country."

Hawkins added that this victory is as important for the Sisseton-Wahpeton tribe and North and South Dakota as it is for Keeble and his family. "We are all extremely proud that Woody is finally receiving this honor. He epitomized our cultural values of humility, compassion, bravery, strength and honor."

He added that Woody was the embodiment of "woyuonihan," or, "honor," always carrying himself in a way so that those who knew him would be proud of him. "He lived a life full of honor and respect."

Hawkins said his feelings about Keeble echo those of all who knew him. "If he was alive today, I would tell him there's no one I respect more, and how he is everything a man should be: brave, kind and generous. I would tell him how proud I am of him, and how I never realized that all this time, I was living with such greatness."


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; US: North Dakota
KEYWORDS: americanindians; armedforces; bravery; courage; guadalcanal; hero; indians; korea; koreanwar; medalofhonor; military; moh; nativeamericans; presidentbush; selflessness; sioux; siouxnation; usarmy; veterans; worldwar2; wowaditaka
The State of North Dakota and the Sioux Nation should be very proud of this hero.
1 posted on 02/27/2008 5:29:55 AM PST by 2ndDivisionVet
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To: IncPen

ping


2 posted on 02/27/2008 5:37:32 AM PST by Nailbiter
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

What an amazing story.


3 posted on 02/27/2008 5:37:40 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (ENERGY CRISIS made in Washington D. C.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
In 1942 Keeble joined the North Dakota National Guard, and in October that year, found himself embroiled in some of the fiercest hand-to-hand combat of World War II on Guadalcanal.

Don't tell John Kerry

Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) Compares Guard Service To Draft-Dodging. “‘If people went to Canada, if people opposed the war, if people chose to be in the Guard, that’s their choice, and I’ve never raised that in an issue,’ he said.” (Noelle Straub, “Kerry Presents Himself As GOP’s Worst Nightmare,” Boston Herald, 2/3/04)

Kerry Repeats Insult Of Guard. “‘I’ve never made any judgments about any choice somebody made about avoiding the draft, about going to Canada, going to jail, being a conscientious objector, going into the National Guard,’ Kerry, a decorated Vietnam veteran, told Fox News Channel. ‘Those are choices people make.’” (Nick Anderson, “Buoyant Kerry Embraces Role Of Frontrunner,” Los Angeles Times, 2/4/04)

DNC Chair Terry McAuliffe Says National Guard Service Not Part of Military. “George Bush never served in our military and our country.” (ABC’s “This Week,” 2/1/04)

4 posted on 02/27/2008 5:37:42 AM PST by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: 2banana
Don't tell John Kerry.

A bit different. Vietnam was the only war of the last century where the Guard wasn't used so it was a haven for those wanting to avoid getting shot at.

5 posted on 02/27/2008 5:43:56 AM PST by Non-Sequitur (Save Fredericksburg. Support CVBT.)
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To: Non-Sequitur
A bit different. Vietnam was the only war of the last century where the Guard wasn't used so it was a haven for those wanting to avoid getting shot at.

Au contrair - many Guard units were activated and sent to Vietnam...

6 posted on 02/27/2008 5:54:47 AM PST by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

A grateful nation says, “Thank You Master Sgt. Woodrow Wilson Keeble. Rest In Peace.”


7 posted on 02/27/2008 5:54:47 AM PST by ricks_place
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To: 2banana
You're mixing apples and oranges. The National Guard saw service in WWII and the Korean War.

Somebody kept them out of the Nam ~ made it an attractive place for folks who didn't wish to go to war, and only a fool would argue that the Guard during the Nam was heroic.

Save your umbridge for something else.

8 posted on 02/27/2008 6:06:39 AM PST by muawiyah
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To: 2banana
Au contrair - many Guard units were activated and sent to Vietnam...

Not according to the Reserve Officer's Association. Link.

9 posted on 02/27/2008 6:09:08 AM PST by Non-Sequitur (Save Fredericksburg. Support CVBT.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

But the NCAA won’t allow the name “Fighting Sioux”.


10 posted on 02/27/2008 6:09:49 AM PST by reg45
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To: Non-Sequitur

You should read your own link.

It gives a detasiled listing of what National Guard units were deployed to Viet Nam and where they were deployed to.


11 posted on 02/27/2008 6:14:36 AM PST by usmcobra (I sing Karaoke the way it was meant to be sung, drunk, badly and in Japanese)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

...”Hawkins said 83 grenade fragments were removed from Keeble’s body, but several others remained. “You could tell that the wounds bothered him sometimes, but he never complained. Sagami wrote in his statement that Keeble did not complain on the battlefield either. “At no time did he allow himself to be evacuated during the course of the day. Only after the unit was in defensive positions for the night did he allow himself to be evacuated.”

Compare MSG Keeble’s story to that of the 2004 democrat party nominee for President, the odious John Forbes Kerry. It makes me want to puke when I think how far America has fallen that she would allow the likes of Kerry to even be a Senator, much less run for President.

This piece should be sent to every newspaper in the USA so the anti-American leftists can read about a real American hero, not a phony POS like Kerry. But, they would not reprint it because they are too busy carrying water for another leftwing elitist fraud, Barack Hussein Obama.


12 posted on 02/27/2008 6:20:09 AM PST by astounded (The Democrat Party is a Clear and Present Danger to the USA)
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To: Non-Sequitur; usmcobra; All

IIRC, President Bush volunteered for Vietnam service in the Air Guard, did he not? http://instapundit.com/archives/018057.php


13 posted on 02/27/2008 6:21:43 AM PST by 2ndDivisionVet (http://www.fourfriedchickensandacoke.blogspot.com)
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To: usmcobra
Truley a touching story and one that deserves a posting here. I just wish people wouldn’t desecrate it by mentioning the traitor John Kerry. I know about how paper work disappears from the war zone and my hat is off to this fine American’s family.
14 posted on 02/27/2008 6:27:58 AM PST by Wavrnr10 (Eagles soar but weasels don't get sucked in jet engines)
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To: usmcobra
It gives a detasiled listing of what National Guard units were deployed to Viet Nam and where they were deployed to.

Yep, all 8 of them. Is that your definition of 'a lot'?

15 posted on 02/27/2008 6:43:05 AM PST by Non-Sequitur (Save Fredericksburg. Support CVBT.)
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To: reg45
But the NCAA won’t allow the name “Fighting Sioux”.

Makes you wonder what Sgt. Keeble thought of that?

16 posted on 02/27/2008 6:44:43 AM PST by Non-Sequitur (Save Fredericksburg. Support CVBT.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
You will be remembered Master Sgt. Woodrow Wilson Keeble. Thank you Sir for a lifetime of service.

May you rest in peace.

17 posted on 02/27/2008 6:44:48 AM PST by poobear (Pure democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what's for dinner. God save the Republic!)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
He was a true Lakota warrior. While Sioux is often used to describe this tribe, it is not what these people called themselves and is somewhat derogatory in origin. Depending on the dialect of the tribe, the name can be rendered Lakota, Dakota or Nakota with Lakota being generally the most common. His family currently resides in South Dakota.
18 posted on 02/27/2008 6:48:12 AM PST by The Great RJ ("Mir we bleiwen wat mir sin" or "We want to remain what we are." ..Luxembourg motto)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet; BIGLOOK; Jet Jaguar; Kathy in Alaska; LUV W; GodBlessUSA; HiJinx; SandRat
The State of North Dakota and the Sioux Nation should be very proud of this hero.

The whole COUNTRY should be proud of him!

Ping!

19 posted on 02/27/2008 7:26:38 AM PST by StarCMC (http://cannoneerno4.wordpress.com/2008/02/24/peoples-information-support-team/ -JOIN US!-We're PIST!)
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To: Non-Sequitur
Not according to the Reserve Officer's Association. Link.

Did you even read your link????

For the Army Reserve forty-two Army Reserve units were recalled of which 35 were sent overseas

On May 13, 1968, 12,234 Army National Guardsmen in 20 units from 17 states were mobilized for service during the Vietnam War.

Air Force reservists were recalled twice in 1968, in January and again in May. In the first instance, two military airlift wings, five groups, and an aerospace rescue and recovery squadron were ordered to active duty on January 26. On May 13, operational elements of a tactical airlift group, including three aerial port squadrons, a medical service squadron, and an aero medical evacuation squadron were recalled

Air reservists alone undertook nearly 1,250 such missions [missions during their annual two week training duty] during the war.

20 posted on 02/27/2008 7:42:11 AM PST by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: muawiyah
There were two Army National Guard Field Artillery Battalions and two Combat Engineer Battalions and some smaller units activated and sent to Viet Nam in 1966.

I know because my Late Father volunteered to go to Nam as a PIO for 6 months that year. He covered those units, told me about them and showed me the pictures he took of them.

He also told me about trying to give the stories and pitctures of them to one the bureau chiefs in Siagon. The chief refused to take them because they didn't show the Viet Nam War he wanted the American public to see. That treasonous bastard's name was Dan Rather.

21 posted on 02/27/2008 7:59:14 AM PST by Redleg Duke ("All gave some, and some gave all!")
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To: 2banana
Did you even read your link????

Yes I did, did you? Or are you not aware that there is a difference between Army Reserve and National Guard? Reserve units were called up during Vietnam. With very few exceptions Guard units were not. Contrast that with the other wars of the 20th century. If you were in the Guard during WWI and WWII, you chances of getting called up were at or near 100%. During Korea and both Gulf wars, your chances of being called up were very high. During Vietnam, you chances of being called up involuntarily were near zero. Which is why membership in the Guard during that time was so popular for those who couldn't get deferments through other means.

22 posted on 02/27/2008 7:59:37 AM PST by Non-Sequitur (Save Fredericksburg. Support CVBT.)
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To: Redleg Duke

BIG CORRECTION. It was 1969, not 1966!


23 posted on 02/27/2008 7:59:58 AM PST by Redleg Duke ("All gave some, and some gave all!")
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To: Non-Sequitur
Yes I did, did you? Or are you not aware that there is a difference between Army Reserve and National Guard? Reserve units were called up during Vietnam. With very few exceptions Guard units were not. Contrast that with the other wars of the 20th century. If you were in the Guard during WWI and WWII, you chances of getting called up were at or near 100%. During Korea and both Gulf wars, your chances of being called up were very high. During Vietnam, you chances of being called up involuntarily were near zero. Which is why membership in the Guard during that time was so popular for those who couldn't get deferments through other means.

Re-read my original post - I said "Many Guard units were activated and sent to Vietnam". Your own evidence supports this statement. You seem to be on jihad to degrade this honorable service of people in the Guard 1965-1975. No - I never said they were activated like in WWII and I never said there was a mass mobilization.

And PS - Reserves and Guard are practically the same for service and mobilization. Yes - the governor has to give permission for the Guard. Talk about splitting hairs.

24 posted on 02/27/2008 8:07:56 AM PST by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
I know the Lakota are.

"Perhaps today is a good day to die."

Semper Fi Brother.

25 posted on 02/27/2008 9:29:37 AM PST by mad_as_he$$ (John McCain - The Manchurian Candidate? http://www.usvetdsp.com/manchuan.htm)
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To: usmcobra

Are you mixing Reserve and Guard up?


26 posted on 02/27/2008 9:31:57 AM PST by mad_as_he$$ (John McCain - The Manchurian Candidate? http://www.usvetdsp.com/manchuan.htm)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

What a remarkable story about a great American hero!


27 posted on 02/27/2008 10:16:02 AM PST by Gritty (Never, never, never, give in except to convictions of honor and good sense-Sir Winston Churchill)
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To: Redleg Duke
Indiana Air National Guard got involved, and some of the Texas ANG for awhile.

In general, most of the NGs who served in Nam missed too many meetings. A smaller number simply volunteered.

28 posted on 02/27/2008 12:30:22 PM PST by muawiyah
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Good story and good for the Lakota people as well as all americans


29 posted on 02/27/2008 12:38:26 PM PST by Intimidator (Its not unilateral,just try saying you're a Progressive Dem in your typical Evangelical chur)
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To: muawiyah

AN indiana NG Ranger unit was very highly decorated and saw action as intense or more so than most. I am aware they were the exception though.


30 posted on 02/27/2008 6:16:08 PM PST by DMZFrank
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To: mad_as_he$$
"It is a good day to die."

Crazy Horse (Ta Shanko Witco)

Okay, all you Lakota guys, if I spelled it wrong, it's an innocent goof!

31 posted on 02/27/2008 6:55:12 PM PST by stboz
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To: stboz
I have seen no less than four different spellings and even within the people I have seen them argue well into the night about it. Your honor is understood and appreciated. by the people. I have sent the link for this thread to my hunting buddy who is a Lakota Elder. He will be touched by our thoughts.
32 posted on 02/27/2008 7:28:56 PM PST by mad_as_he$$ (John McCain - The Manchurian Candidate? http://www.usvetdsp.com/manchuan.htm)
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To: Non-Sequitur

Eight of them does not make for none what so ever, by the way you didn’t count the Air National Guard units and the Marine reserve units, or for that matter all the reserve officers that were sent to Viet Nam.


33 posted on 02/27/2008 9:39:43 PM PST by usmcobra (I sing Karaoke the way it was meant to be sung, drunk, badly and in Japanese)
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To: usmcobra
Eight of them does not make for none what so ever, by the way you didn’t count the Air National Guard units and the Marine reserve units, or for that matter all the reserve officers that were sent to Viet Nam.

Most states have more than 8 of their units called up for Iraq alone, so the number of guard units called up for Vietnam certainly paled by comparison. The fact is undeniable that during Vietnam the chances of joining the guard and going to war was next to zero, while guard members during the World Wars or the Iraq wars had close to a 100 percent chance of going. Quibble over semantics all you want, during Vietnam the National Guard was the branch of choice for those who couldn't avoid going to the war through other means.

34 posted on 02/28/2008 3:59:48 AM PST by Non-Sequitur (Save Fredericksburg. Support CVBT.)
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Good to see Woody honored. I lived in the same town as Woody and while we knew he was a war hero, we didn’t know the extent of his heorism and it is really something to read the account. The last thing I remember of him was being confined to a wheelchair. Also, his wife Blossom was my 9th grade English teacher.


35 posted on 03/02/2008 8:16:10 PM PST by vhs74
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

His bravery in combat, leading Soldiers, is beyond question. Of his call to duty, Master Sergeant Keeble said,

——“There were terrible moments that encompassed a lifetime, an endlessness, when terror was so strong in me, that I could feel idiocy replace reason. (Yet,) I have never left my position, nor have I shirked hazardous duty. Fear did not make a coward out of me.”

Master Sergeant Keeble volunteered for duty when members of the 164th Inf. Reg. were called to fight in the Korean War. When asked why, he replied,

-——“Somebody has to teach these kids how to fight.”


36 posted on 03/03/2008 11:49:04 AM PST by Tulsa Ramjet ("If not now, when?" "Because it's judgment that defeats us.")
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