Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

William F. Buckley’s ‘Conservative Movement’ Still-Born, Dead-On-Arrival, Because it Was Godless...
The American View ^ | 3/3/2008 | John Lofton ("recovering Republican, recovering conservative")

Posted on 03/03/2008 1:57:22 PM PST by Jim Robinson

William F. Buckley’s ‘Conservative Movement’ Still-Born, Dead-On-Arrival, Decades Ago, Because it Was Godless, Against Christ, Ignored God’s Word

Contact: John Lofton, 301-873-4612, 410-760-8885, JLof@aol.com

MEDIA ADVISORY, March 3 /Christian Newswire/ — Recovering Republican John Lofton, Editor of TheAmericanView.com and co-host of “The American View” radio show with the Constitution Party’s 2004 Presidential candidate Michael Anthony Peroutka, has issued the following statement:

“Except the LORD build the house, they labour in vain that build it: except the LORD keep the city, the watchman waketh but in vain.” – Psalm 127.

The Lord Jesus Christ did not build the “conservative movement” house. Thus, it was a house built on sand, it fell and great has been the fall of it, a recent example of this fall being the “conservative movement’s” support for President of George W. Bush who has given us the most Godless, unconstitutional, debt-ridden, big spending Federal Government in our history.

Even though most of its “leaders” claimed to be Christians, the “conservative movement” was dead-on-arrival because, from the beginning, it’s political plan was Godless, against Christ, and ignored the Bible. This “movement” vainly imagined succeeding without honoring Christ, succeeding through bread-alone, flesh-and-blood-only-politics when God tells us the REAL battle is a spiritual war which must be fought in the full-armor of God (Ephesians 6:10ff).

An example of the Godlessness I allude to occurred when I was on Bill Buckley’s “Firing Line” program June 24, 1987. Referring to him having told Malcolm Muggeridge that he (Buckley) did not believe there was a Christian means of organizing society, I asked Bill: “Wouldn’t God’s Laws, wouldn’t the Laws of Christ be a means of organizing a society?” Buckley said: “No. No….The consent of the governed in societies ruled by the people is the ultimate source of authority.”

Alexander Solzhenitsyn was once asked how just a few Communists could take over his country when it had a thousand years of being Christian? He replied: “We forgot God.” The leaders of the “conservative movement,” politically-speaking, forgot God. They forgot that the Lord Jesus Christ is Lord over ALL, including politics. They forgot that He is King of kings, Lord of lords, with ALL power in Heaven and on earth. They forgot Psalm 2:12 commands: “Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. Blessed are all they that put their trust in him.”

I know all of what I say here is true because, from the inside, I ran with this “conservative movement” from the mid-1960s to 1980 when God, by His grace alone, raptured me from among this Christless crowd – something for which, literally, I will be eternally grateful.

To hear much more on this subject, please click here to hear the latest “The American View” radio show http://www.theamericanview.com/dictator/media/997/show_145.mp3

If you’d like to interview John Lofton, you may reach him by calling: 301-873-4612; 410-760-8885; or by email: JLof@aol.com.


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: anticatholicism; buckley; conservatism; constitutionparty; johnlofton; wfb; williamfbuckley; williamfbuckleyjr
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-150151-176 next last
Reposted from here:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1979514/posts?page=5#5

Interesting viewpoint.

1 posted on 03/03/2008 1:57:25 PM PST by Jim Robinson
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson

Agreed


2 posted on 03/03/2008 1:58:38 PM PST by Squidpup ("Fight the Good Fight")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson
I don't know how much more "religious" NR could have been. In fact, it was extremely religious, unless the author objects to Roman Catholicism.

My statement to the author would be, "You are criticizing, but offering nothing concrete, just sand castles in the sky."

My question would be, "Just how would conservatism have been built along the lines you prescribe? What do you want?"

3 posted on 03/03/2008 2:04:55 PM PST by jammer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson
In other words, Buckley's view of government was of Washington's America, while Lofton's is Calvin's Geneva.

I prefer the former.

4 posted on 03/03/2008 2:05:15 PM PST by wideawake (Why is it that those who call themselves Constitutionalists know the least about the Constitution?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson

5 posted on 03/03/2008 2:05:47 PM PST by ari-freedom (Obama on the islamic call to prayer: ''one of the prettiest sounds on Earth at sunset'')
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: jammer
unless the author objects to Roman Catholicism

Ding ding ding. We have a winner.

6 posted on 03/03/2008 2:06:30 PM PST by wideawake (Why is it that those who call themselves Constitutionalists know the least about the Constitution?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: jammer
My question would be, "Just how would conservatism have been built along the lines you prescribe? What do you want?"

Let's cut through the code language.

The author wants the Mackerel-Snapping Papists thrown out.

7 posted on 03/03/2008 2:07:34 PM PST by steve-b (Sin lies only in hurting others unnecessarily. All other "sins" are invented nonsense. --RAH)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson

BTTT


8 posted on 03/03/2008 2:07:37 PM PST by Tennessee Nana
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson

One of the most interesting and educational documents I’ve ever read was the Virginia Declaration, 1776.

Here are sections 15 and 16.

SEC. 15. That no free government, or the blessings of liberty, can be preserved to any people, but by a firm adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, frugality, and virtue, and by frequent recurrence to fundamental principles.

SEC. 16. That religion, or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence; and therefore all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience; and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance, love, and charity toward each other.


9 posted on 03/03/2008 2:07:50 PM PST by I still care ("Remember... for it is the doom of men that they forget" - Merlin, from Excalibur)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson

Thanks, Lofton. Now kindly STFU.


10 posted on 03/03/2008 2:08:28 PM PST by Larry Lucido
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson

And pushing to divide Israel and honoring this strange god “allah” in our land does not help.

But I don’t know what, Constitutionally, can be done about the latter, except to declare it a fifth-column.


11 posted on 03/03/2008 2:09:48 PM PST by F15Eagle (1Tim 1:4; Gal 1:6-10; 1Cor 2:2; Matthew 22:30; Mark 12:25; Luke 20:34-35; 2Thess 2:11; Jude 1:3)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson

A simple case of the Calvinist trashing the Catholic.

It happens every day.


12 posted on 03/03/2008 2:11:25 PM PST by Petronski (Nice job, Hillary. Now go home and get your shine box.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson
We forgot God.

Some have not just forgotten God but have sided with the fanatics in America who have declared war against God.

13 posted on 03/03/2008 2:11:33 PM PST by OriginalIntent (Undo the ACLU revision of the Constitution. If you agree with the ACLU revisions, you are a liberal)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: wideawake

Or England under Oliver’s Army.


14 posted on 03/03/2008 2:12:34 PM PST by Clemenza (I Live in New Jersey for the Same Reason People Slow Down to Look at Car Crashes)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: wideawake; jammer

Several of the key players at NR in the early days were Catholic or were converts to Catholicism. They included Wilmoore Kendall, Russell Kirk, L. Brent Bozell, Jr., and Frank Meyer (converted on his death bed).


15 posted on 03/03/2008 2:13:01 PM PST by Pyro7480 ("Jesu, Jesu, Jesu, esto mihi Jesus" -St. Ralph Sherwin's last words at Tyburn)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: steve-b

Not only fish-eating papists, but JEWS, like that Goldberg fella. Probably supported flouridation.

(yes, sarcasm).


16 posted on 03/03/2008 2:13:09 PM PST by MeanWestTexan (Kol Hakavod Mossad!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson
"Render unto God what is God's. Render unto Caesar what is Caesar's".

The repblic, and our civic duty, is Caesar's, and our principle of "separation of church and state" is there because politics corrupts religion.

17 posted on 03/03/2008 2:15:01 PM PST by tacticalogic ("Oh bother!" said Pooh, as he chambered his last round.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Petronski
Did you see Lofton's use of the word rapture? I bet he is not a Calvinist.
18 posted on 03/03/2008 2:17:27 PM PST by Binghamton_native
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: ari-freedom

19 posted on 03/03/2008 2:17:42 PM PST by Petronski (Nice job, Hillary. Now go home and get your shine box.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson
The aerospace industry, the interstate highway system, the internet, etc. are at least as "Godless" as Conservatism if not moreso.

None of these is a complete failure. None of these is still-born. None of these is in danger of collapsing.

So in what way is the conservative movement different that it should be DOA while these other major movements/institutions are still ongoing?

20 posted on 03/03/2008 2:17:47 PM PST by who_would_fardels_bear
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pyro7480

Those are some very bright men you have listed. Russell Kirk, a good Catholic, a very bright and kind man.


21 posted on 03/03/2008 2:18:10 PM PST by OriginalIntent (Undo the ACLU revision of the Constitution. If you agree with the ACLU revisions, you are a liberal)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Binghamton_native

Perhaps he’s just a liar.


22 posted on 03/03/2008 2:19:14 PM PST by Petronski (Nice job, Hillary. Now go home and get your shine box.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: F15Eagle
But I don’t know what, Constitutionally, can be done about the latter, except to declare it a fifth-column.

I think their Constitutional protection of freedom of religion extends to the point that they start demanding preferential treatment. When they start doing that, we don't owe them that courtesy any longer.

23 posted on 03/03/2008 2:19:14 PM PST by tacticalogic ("Oh bother!" said Pooh, as he chambered his last round.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson
But what, exactly, is Lofton saying? That we need a Christian king, as in Charlemagne or the Byzantine Emperor? That we need laws explicitly copied from the Bible-- and then we may ask, the Old Testament or the New? Are we to enact Deuteronomy and Leviticus live Kosher? Not even Israel does that.

Should we be governed by clergy? And if so, whose clergy?

My Church (Catholic) argues, for instance, that since God is the Author of both the Book of Scripture (Biblical law, based on revelation) and the Book of Nature (Natural Law, based on reason), a fully accurate understanding will produce the same conclusions, the same result, for both (since Truth = Truth by either method.)

That means that in a nation like the USA where not everybody accepts the authority of Scripture, one can argue on the basis of Natural Law as the method for devising reasonable, God-pleasing policies and composing just, God-pleasing laws.

But that brings us back to where we are now, does it not? Because when we use the ordinary rules of evidence and reason to advocate just laws, we're contending via debate and persuasion just like we are now.

There would seem to be the two basic choices: government by clergy via decree, of government by citizens via persuasion.

So what we're doing now is debate and persuasion, a gradual and incremental process. How in effect would Lofton's process differ from Buckley's?

24 posted on 03/03/2008 2:19:14 PM PST by Mrs. Don-o ("The Church of the Living God: the Pillar and Foundation of the Truth." 1 Timothy 3:15)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson
Lofton took issue with the following answer from WFB:

An example of the Godlessness I allude to occurred when I was on Bill Buckley’s “Firing Line” program June 24, 1987. Referring to him having told Malcolm Muggeridge that he (Buckley) did not believe there was a Christian means of organizing society, I asked Bill: “Wouldn’t God’s Laws, wouldn’t the Laws of Christ be a means of organizing a society?” Buckley said: “No. No….The consent of the governed in societies ruled by the people is the ultimate source of authority.”

Does this mean that Lofton would govern without the consent of the governed?
25 posted on 03/03/2008 2:20:04 PM PST by Binghamton_native
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson

Buckley, Russell Kirk and Whittaker Chambers were men of very deep faith.


26 posted on 03/03/2008 2:22:09 PM PST by Tribune7 (How is inflicting pain and death on an innocent, helpless human being for profit, moral?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Binghamton_native

Kinda takes the idea of “Constitutionalist” (or Constimatooshunalist) and stands it on its ear.


27 posted on 03/03/2008 2:22:56 PM PST by Petronski (Nice job, Hillary. Now go home and get your shine box.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson
Here is the Cathlic Review obit regarding Obama.

http://www.catholicreview.org/subpages/storyworldnew.aspx?action=2963

He wrote an account of his Catholic beliefs in the 1997 book “Nearer, My God: An Autobiography of Faith.”

28 posted on 03/03/2008 2:23:11 PM PST by mware (Americans in arm chairs doing the job that the media refuses to do.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tribune7

This evangelical Christian agrees.


29 posted on 03/03/2008 2:23:35 PM PST by Binghamton_native
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: wideawake

“I prefer the former.”

No, Lofton’s view of government is Washington’s America and Buckley’s is Payne’s America.


30 posted on 03/03/2008 2:24:17 PM PST by demshateGod (the GOP is dead to me)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Petronski

I have one comment:

The Calvinists AND the Catholics had better get their acts together - and I do mean TOGETHER - or the godless secularists and the Islamists are going to make sure we’re utterly destroyed.

The hour is late...


31 posted on 03/03/2008 2:25:23 PM PST by EternalVigilance (McCain supporters: "We have nothing to offer but fear itself!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: demshateGod

You think Buckley was a devotee of Thomas Paine!? Give me a break!


32 posted on 03/03/2008 2:25:29 PM PST by Pyro7480 ("Jesu, Jesu, Jesu, esto mihi Jesus" -St. Ralph Sherwin's last words at Tyburn)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: EternalVigilance

Perhaps the Calvinists ought to drop this sanctimonious “Whore of Babylon” crap.


33 posted on 03/03/2008 2:26:38 PM PST by Petronski (Nice job, Hillary. Now go home and get your shine box.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson
The Bill of Rights was guaranteed by God.. not government.. the document says.. Govt didn't give them and govt cant take them away.. Goverments ALIENATE rights on whims globally.. always have.. These rights are said to be UNalienable.. because the government didn't give them.. Big difference between privileges and RIGHTS.. Every government on this planet gives privileges except ONE.. The U.S.,A.. The goverments of Europe and Canada have ZERO rights, merely privileges..

UNalienable Rights given by God.. BUT if you allow your government to deport God.. then those rights can be alienated.. Americans are allowing God to be deported out of Politics.. any rights we HAD are in jeopardy.. The American is getting set up to alienate them.. Some are partially alienated already..

34 posted on 03/03/2008 2:27:05 PM PST by hosepipe (CAUTION: This propaganda is laced with hyperbole....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Binghamton_native

FDR was a student and disciple of Endicott Peabody, and look what that got us.


35 posted on 03/03/2008 2:27:17 PM PST by tacticalogic ("Oh bother!" said Pooh, as he chambered his last round.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson
‘Conservative Movement’ Still-Born........

I ran with this “conservative movement” from the mid-1960s to 1980




So he ran with a still-born for nearly twenty-years?
36 posted on 03/03/2008 2:28:09 PM PST by macamadamia ("The best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity." Yeats)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: jammer
I don't know how much more "religious" NR could have been. In fact, it was extremely religious, unless the author objects to Roman Catholicism.

Touche.'

37 posted on 03/03/2008 2:28:31 PM PST by E. Pluribus Unum (Islam is a religion of peace, and Muslims reserve the right to kill anyone who says otherwise.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson

Lofton has confused WFB with Ayn Rand.


38 posted on 03/03/2008 2:28:32 PM PST by Snickersnee (Where are we going? And what's with this handbasket?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mware
Here is the Catholic Review obit regarding Obama.

Are you doing two things at once?

39 posted on 03/03/2008 2:28:37 PM PST by Petronski (Nice job, Hillary. Now go home and get your shine box.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson

I don’t know about Bill Buckley’s personal deal with Jesus- that’s between Bill and Jesus.

The movement, I think, had some elements in common with the Revolutionary bunch who founded the nation under, what I believe to be, the direction and inspiration of God. He invented freedom after all, and regularly moves on behalf of the oppressed and bound.

But conservatism was infiltrated by globalist operatives. Perhaps even some of the founders were globalists, I don’t know for sure. One explanation for the constant leftward drift and increasingly loose redefinition of ‘conservatism’ since it’s inception can be traced in the evil words of Quigley:

The chief problem of American political life...has been how to make the two Congressional parties more national and international. The argument that the two parties should represent opposed ideals and policies, one, perhaps, of the Right and the other of the Left, is a foolish idea acceptable only to doctrinaire and academic thinkers. Instead, the two parties should be almost identical, so that the American people can ‘throw the rascals out’ at any election without leading to any profound or extensive shifts in policy.”

~Carroll Quigley, ‘Tragedy and Hope’

Conservatism was doomed from the beginning by the rebuilders of modern Babel. God has nothing to do with such ambitions.


40 posted on 03/03/2008 2:28:56 PM PST by ovrtaxt (Member of the irate, tireless minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: wideawake
Buckley wasn’t a “conservative Catholic” - "In fact, Buckley was not a conservative Catholic, in the religious, doctrinal sense of the term. He opposed the wisdom of church teaching on social and political issues. He favored decriminalizing drugs and wrote for Playboy. For a time, he defended southern segregationists and supported birth control. In other words, Buckley was not the intellectual godfather of Ray Flynn or Bob Casey, Sr. This is not to suggest that Buckley was a liberal Catholic in the religious sense. Besides his lifelong opposition to socialism and communism, he opposed legalized abortion and opposed “Playboyism.” So what was Buckley? He was an idiosyncratic Catholic. On political issues, he took conservative stands, as well as a few liberal ones. As an example of the latter, he wrote a book arguing that the state, not the free market, was better able to nurture citizenship and a sense of civic obligation. On religious issues, he was a mixture of both. His views are complicated. He called himself a Catholic and a libertarian. Go figure."
41 posted on 03/03/2008 2:29:09 PM PST by Tailgunner Joe
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Petronski
Rapture is not a Calvinist thing, look at the Anabaptists.
42 posted on 03/03/2008 2:29:11 PM PST by Little Bill (Welcome to the Newly Socialist State of New Hampshire)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: BibChr

bookmark


43 posted on 03/03/2008 2:29:12 PM PST by BibChr ("...behold, they have rejected the word of the LORD, so what wisdom is in them?" [Jer. 8:9])
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pyro7480; wideawake

Absolutely, but I think you left out the most famous one, Whittaker Chambers.


44 posted on 03/03/2008 2:29:16 PM PST by jammer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: All
William F. Buckley Jr. dies at age 82

By Carol Zimmermann Catholic News Service

WASHINGTON – William F. Buckley Jr., a Catholic with an extraordinary gift for the spoken and written word who was dubbed the godfather of modern American conservatism, died Feb. 27 at his home in Stamford, Conn. He was 82.

The commentator suffered from diabetes and emphysema, but the exact cause of death was not known. Buckley was found dead at the desk in his study where he reportedly had been writing.

“He died with his boots on, after a lifetime of riding pretty tall in the saddle,” his son, Christopher, was quoted as saying.

Funeral arrangements had not been announced as of Feb. 28.

Buckley may have been best known for his work with the National Review, a conservative political magazine he founded in 1955 and where he served as editor until 1990. He also wrote more than 50 books as diverse as spy novels and a book on sailing. He wrote an account of his Catholic beliefs in the 1997 book “Nearer, My God: An Autobiography of Faith.”

He also was a television host for more than 30 years for the PBS program “Firing Line.”

Buckley was born in New York in 1925, the sixth of 10 children. His father, who made his multimillion-dollar fortune in oil, had his children educated by personal tutors at the Buckley family estate in Sharon, Conn., and Catholic schools in England and France.

Buckley served in the Army from 1944 to 1946, and then attended Yale University, where he studied political science, economics and history. In 1951 he published his first book, “God and Man at Yale: The Superstitions of Academic Freedom,” accusing the university’s faculty of a bias against religion, individualism and capitalism.

In 1961, Buckley was criticized by the editors of America magazine, a national Catholic weekly magazine run by the U.S. Jesuits, over comments he had supposedly made that were critical of Pope John XXIII’s encyclical “Mater et Magistra” (“Mother and Teacher”).

An article critical of the encyclical appeared in the National Review with the quip “Mater, si, magistra, no!” attributed to Buckley. The quip was a pun on an anti-American chant, “Cuba, si, yanqui, no,” in the news at the time.

The comment generated rounds of complaint letters and editorials on the topic along with an opinion piece in The New York Times in which Buckley complained about America magazine’s coverage.

A month after the controversy arose, Buckley wrote a letter to America’s editor in which he stated the comment was a “flippancy pure and simple” that had not come from him, but from a Catholic scholar and journalist who turned out to be Gary Wills, a contributor to the National Review in 1961.

Almost 30 years later, Buckley was again featured in America magazine. Prior to Pope John Paul II’s 1987 visit to the United States, Buckley was one of 10 prominent Catholics asked by the magazine to respond to the question: “If you had five minutes alone with the pope, what would you say?”

In Buckley’s hypothetical address to the pope, he noted that he wished to pass along “apparently trivial complaints,” such as the failure of the Second Vatican Council to increase the “universal appeal of the church.”

He bemoaned the loss of the Latin liturgy as a “shared sense of historical transcendence” and said he had “subjective doubts about some of the doctrinal questions you have elected to stress.”

He also said he believed “the church is never so grand as when it defies the spirit of the age.”

In a 1973 interview with The Evangelist, newspaper of the Diocese of Albany, N.Y., Buckley called the English-language Mass a “catastrophe.”

“It isn’t in the Catholic tradition of the last 500 years,” he said. “Mass was a bilateral not a trilateral experience. It was between us and God through the priest. Now it seeks to be between us, the priest and whoever else is there.”

One of the major problems with the Mass in English, he noted, was the translation, which he described as “enough to make anyone with concern for the language wince.”

“It is a major penance to recite it aloud. I am tempted at times to wear earmuffs in church,” he said.

In the interview, Buckley added that he was proud of the church for its stance against abortion, something he reiterated in his National Review columns.

In a 1997 interview broadcast on the PBS program “The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer,” Buckley was asked if there was one feature of the Catholic Church that kept him a Catholic. In response, he said it was “the centrality of the assumption that the Catholic Church is the church that was founded by Christ.”

When asked how he squared his conservative views with Catholic social teaching, he said, “There’s always a tendency in churches, as far as I can see, to say we’ve got to build one more gymnasium for the homeless. And I think we should build one more gymnasium – don’t get me wrong – but the attempt to suck spiritual energy into activity of that kind, in my judgment, doesn’t really pay off.”

Buckley’s wife of 56 years, Patricia Buckley, died in April 2007.

Besides son Christopher, an author and satirist who lives in Washington, Buckley is survived by two brothers, three sisters and two grandchildren.

45 posted on 03/03/2008 2:29:30 PM PST by mware (Americans in arm chairs doing the job that the media refuses to do.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: jammer; wideawake

I thought Chambers was an Episcopalian.


46 posted on 03/03/2008 2:30:49 PM PST by Pyro7480 ("Jesu, Jesu, Jesu, esto mihi Jesus" -St. Ralph Sherwin's last words at Tyburn)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: Petronski

OMG. sorry about that.


47 posted on 03/03/2008 2:30:59 PM PST by mware (Americans in arm chairs doing the job that the media refuses to do.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson

WFB was hardly godless.

He was not a theocrat, but that is not the same as being godless. As far as I know, he was a faithful Catholic.

There are Catholics who are theocrats (mainly monarchists), but Buckley was not among them.

This guy (Lofton) seems to be a dispensationalist theocrat. Not my cup of tea. Takes all kinds, I suppose.


48 posted on 03/03/2008 2:31:24 PM PST by B Knotts (Calvin Coolidge Republican)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson


Really needs this.

Buckley was the MAN in the movement. I've been a reader of NR since 1980.
49 posted on 03/03/2008 2:32:10 PM PST by Kozak (Anti Shahada: There is no god named Allah, and Muhammed is a false prophet)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Petronski

I think you might find that the Calvinists have a different view of eschatology. There is a significant difference in this area of theology between most Calvinists and evangelicals.


50 posted on 03/03/2008 2:32:26 PM PST by Binghamton_native
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-150151-176 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson