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College Degree no job guarantee in China
Los Angeles Times ^ | March 2, 2008 | Don Lee

Posted on 03/03/2008 7:32:31 PM PST by SeekAndFind

WUHAN, CHINA -- Sun Yuanping skipped her college graduation ceremony for a job interview. It was all-day affair and the bookish 22-year-old felt good about it. After all, she has degrees in marketing and botany from well-regarded school in this central Chinese city, and she ranked in the top fifth of her class.

Sun never heard back from that prospective employer nor from dozens of other companies and government agencies where she has applied since she graduated in June. Recently, after tearful self-reflection and long nights tossing in bed, she pared down expectations and began sending her resume to small businesses offering salaries as low as $140 a month, a third of what she hoped to make.

As each jobless day passes and Sun lives off a $100 monthly allowance from her parents, she feels more and more guilty.

"All along, I thought if I went to a good university, everything would be fine," Sun said on a recent snowy afternoon. Her eyes welled with tears as she went on. "At first, it was hard to believe. I considered myself to be quite excellent. I'm struggling to accept this."

Until the start of this decade, a college degree in China put you in elite circles. The government arranged jobs for graduates in public agencies or state-owned enterprises. Unemployment wasn't an issue.

But of the nearly 5 million young people who graduated in June, about 1.45 million were still unemployed in the fall, according to a study published last month by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. Researchers estimated that by year-end, about 75% of the recent graduates had found jobs.

China's graduate employment rate compares favorably with countries such as Japan, where 68% got jobs by the end of the year. No such comprehensive statistic exists for the United States.

(Excerpt) Read more at latimes.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: china; college; degree; job

1 posted on 03/03/2008 7:32:33 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

What? China has an unemployment problem? Oh God, CLOSE THE BORDERS, FAST !!!!


2 posted on 03/03/2008 7:34:37 PM PST by EagleUSA
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To: SeekAndFind

Should we really give a rats butt about China,?


3 posted on 03/03/2008 7:35:00 PM PST by silentreignofheroes (I'm Southron,,and I Vote..,..)
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To: SeekAndFind

A piece of paper doesn’t go very far if one isn’t personable enough or doesn’t interview well.


4 posted on 03/03/2008 7:35:46 PM PST by mtbopfuyn (The fence is "absolutely not the answer" - Gov. Rick Perry (R, TX))
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To: SeekAndFind

They're hiring.

5 posted on 03/03/2008 7:36:46 PM PST by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: SeekAndFind

Wow, China sounds almost as awesome as the globalists told me it was. Let’s send even more of our jobs there. And maybe we can borrow some money from them to expand our government. /s


6 posted on 03/03/2008 7:38:31 PM PST by mysterio
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To: SeekAndFind
Recently, after tearful self-reflection and long nights tossing in bed, she pared down expectations and began sending her resume to small businesses offering salaries as low as $140 a month, a third of what she hoped to make.

Looks like American youth aren't the only ones with an inflated view of themselves and their value.

The self-esteem bug seems to be infecting the rest of the world.

7 posted on 03/03/2008 7:39:14 PM PST by metmom (Welfare was never meant to be a career choice.)
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To: SeekAndFind; mikrofon; Charles Henrickson
"All along, I thought if I went to a good university, everything would be fine," Sun said on a recent snowy afternoon. Her eyes welled with tears as she went on.

When Sunny Gets Blue.

8 posted on 03/03/2008 7:39:46 PM PST by martin_fierro (her eyes get gley and crowdy)
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To: SeekAndFind
Typical liberal article...the author clearly doesn’t grasp how things are done in most of the world, yet chastise others for their own faults. In most of the world, China included, WHO you know is more important than what you know. The girl probably didn’t get the position because someone with connections got it.
9 posted on 03/03/2008 7:40:22 PM PST by highlander_UW (illegal alien is to an undocumented worker as a drug dealer is to an unlicensed pharmacist)
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To: SeekAndFind
Can't she take a government civil service test and get on some hiring list? Just wondering how they dole out government jobs in China. Or do you have to know someone to get in?
10 posted on 03/03/2008 7:43:41 PM PST by Ciexyz
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To: metmom
Looks like American youth aren't the only ones with an inflated view of themselves and their value.

Also, the law of supply and demand seems to work just as well in China as it does in the USA.

When you have more freshly minted graduates with Humanities degrees than the market needs, and you have fewer fast food clerks than McDonald's needs, market forces will prevail.

11 posted on 03/03/2008 7:50:35 PM PST by Iron Munro (Suppose you were an idiot, and suppose you were a member of Congress; but I repeat myself.)
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To: mysterio
Wow, China sounds almost as awesome as the globalists told me it was. Let’s send even more of our jobs there. And maybe we can borrow some money from them to expand our government. /s

Tin-foil hat mode, maybe, maybe not.

A lot of globalists are pushing BRIC (Brazil Russia India China) in search of new customers, as the US customer base is aging and the boomers are starting to retire, having Lewinsky'ed and aborted their offspring out of existence.

Then you have the Madeleine Not-Too-Brights who feel that the world is threatened by the US being the sole Hyperpower and want a new Communist power to provide 'balance'.

Then you have the Communists who want China to do what Russia couldn't.

Then you have the one-world types who need to take out the US in order to institute a global new order.

Complicating all this are the Chi-coms themselves, who want to take over the world, but in the meantime have such a rush of citizens coming of age, that the Chi-coms need to find jobs for all of them quickly, lest they revolt and overthrow the party.

For the moment, all of these interests converge; but it is unstable. China is polluting itself to death, and undercutting the US by taking the jobs, but the jobs are making things for export to the US. Despite the hype, there isn't a middle class in China large enough to support itself. The fecal material will really hit the impeller when China finally has to revalue its artificially low currency.

Cheers!

12 posted on 03/03/2008 7:50:46 PM PST by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
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To: martin_fierro
They're hiring.

Of course they are... but you don't need a college degree to be hired by Starbucks. And a lot of Chinese college grads have HIGHER expectations that simply working as a waiter or cashier at Starbucks.

If you have the money and the right connections, it would be better to OWN one of the franchises.
13 posted on 03/03/2008 7:54:27 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: martin_fierro

Someone should try gluing their ass to a Starbucks toilet. It’s already been done at Home Depot.


14 posted on 03/03/2008 7:55:39 PM PST by jdm (Contrary to popular belief, the search function works just fine.)
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To: SeekAndFind

15 posted on 03/03/2008 8:01:47 PM PST by BGHater ($2300 is the limit of your Free Speech.)
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To: metmom


I note the following paragraphs with great interest:

Wuhan Hongbo Group, a private firm, originally ran back-office operations for universities. But in the last few years, the group has launched three colleges in Wuhan. The campus of one of them, Engineering & Commerce College of South-Central University for Nationalities, was built on tens of acres of reclaimed land near the stretch of the Yangtze River where Mao Tse-tung staged his famous swim in 1966.
The college started out with 800 students; this year it has more than 8,100. Tuition runs from $1,400 to $2,000.


Also this from the same article :

Zhang Jun, vice director of the school's career center, said 92% of the 1,514 graduates in 2007 had found jobs. He said their average pay was about $140 a month, comparable with wages paid at factories and restaurants.

Calculate this -- at an average salary of $140/month, the yearly salary would be $1,400, which is the average tuition paid for a year in college.

Here in the USA, if you went to a private school, your tuition plus room and board would be something like $45,000/year. The average starting salary of an American college grad is about $40,000. In other words, the college degreed American is not doing any better than the average degreed Chinese, the main difference probably would be that it would be easier to find a job after graduation here.

However, if you went to a state university ( especially one in your own state ), or a reasonable private college ( e.g. Grove City College where tuition plus board are about $17,500 a year ), you make out better money-wise after graduation.

So, all in all, it's still better to be a college grad in the good old US of A.
16 posted on 03/03/2008 8:06:54 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: mtbopfuyn
True, but I hope you aren’t trying to say that is fair or just.

The idiot running the interviews in a state run economy is not likely the fairest arbitrator of employment.

At least that’s how I see it.

17 posted on 03/03/2008 8:07:02 PM PST by mamelukesabre (Quantum materiae materietur marmota monax si marmota monax materiam possit materiari?)
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To: SeekAndFind
The only real job is the one you create.
18 posted on 03/03/2008 8:07:38 PM PST by libh8er
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To: SeekAndFind

Great point.


19 posted on 03/03/2008 8:10:43 PM PST by metmom (Welfare was never meant to be a career choice.)
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To: SeekAndFind
After all, she has degrees in marketing and botany...

Well, that's her problem. She should have majored in Engineering or Accounting...Now there's a start for a 22 year-old.

Look, the same problem exists here in the US. Many students get B.A. (or B.S.) degrees in "General Studies", Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, etc. from such schools as the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. But, that get's them no where - slow.

A lot of those individuals find themselves in graduate school getting Law or MBA degrees.

20 posted on 03/03/2008 8:21:28 PM PST by LjubivojeRadosavljevic
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To: silentreignofheroes

Yes if they collapse we can deal with lesser threats and bring back Some industry to America. If they prosper the world will see 10,000 years of darkness.


21 posted on 03/03/2008 8:27:44 PM PST by redstateconfidential (If you are the smartest person in the room,you are hanging out with the wrong people.)
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To: grey_whiskers

CHEERS!


22 posted on 03/03/2008 8:29:05 PM PST by redstateconfidential (If you are the smartest person in the room,you are hanging out with the wrong people.)
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To: Iron Munro
When you have fewer freshly minted, competent graduates with CS degrees than the market needs, and you have fewer IT people than companies need, market forces will prevail.

I suppose that's good for me, since I'm a CS major with business and possibly applied math minors.

23 posted on 03/03/2008 8:41:19 PM PST by rabscuttle385 (I have great faith in the American people. I have no faith in the American government, however.)
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To: LjubivojeRadosavljevic

Even then, the job market can be tough in China. I just hired another recent Chinese grad to work as a project manager for my company.

She speaks fluent English (better than most college students here - in fact, I have her proof read most of our quotes/documents because she catches a lot of the grammatical errors).

She has a BSEE, top 5% of her university (Shanghai Jiao Tong University), VERY bright, hard working. Currently I pay her 1800 RMB per month ($250), for a 55 hour week (M-F, 10 hours a day, Saturday 9 to 2 PM). But at least she could get a job, working for a foreign owned company...:)


24 posted on 03/03/2008 8:42:02 PM PST by PugetSoundSoldier (Indignation over the sting of truth is the defense of the indefensible)
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To: PugetSoundSoldier
What city is she in compared to the young woman in the story?

What school did she get her degree from?

Wondering about the story, you see, since the young lady whose situation is chronicled there was expecting $420/month.

And you (in a "rich" Western firm) are paying a top 5% of the class, with English skills to boot, only $250 / month.

So is it the company, the English skills, the city, or the school (or major), that accounts for the discrepancy?

Cheers!

25 posted on 03/03/2008 8:49:46 PM PST by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
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To: SeekAndFind

I talked to my business partner on the mainland today and he was complaining about new business taxes.

Not sure I got it right as he just mentioned it in passing.

He said there was a new law that that required them to pay lifetime wages to any employee that had 10 or more years of services. In any event his company was looking for ways to cut overhead to manage the increased costs, moving into smaller space etc.

Whatever it is it looks like some of the free ride capitalisim is slowing down and they are going to have to pay some to keep the masses happy.

who knows maybe they will have overhead equal to the US in ten years


26 posted on 03/03/2008 9:34:18 PM PST by underbyte
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To: grey_whiskers

It’s a real example of what the communists refer to as “an exploitation of the worker”. She is being paid FAR below what a dropout burger flipper makes here, works FAR longer hours, and is (mostly, I’m sure) happy to be working.

The fact that she WANTS to work for that wage matters not, because she’s being *EXPLOITED* by the EEEEEVIL capitalists!


27 posted on 03/03/2008 9:48:41 PM PST by Don W (Vote YOUR Honor, or it could become: Vote, your Honor.....)
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To: grey_whiskers

We’re in Shanghai, Minhang district. My hire is from Jiao Tong, a good university here in Shanghai, noted for its electrical engineering program.

Most recent graduates can expect to make 1500-2000 RMB per month working for a Chinese company. Some expect to make more when working for a foreign company; the key is to have a firm stance when negotiating, you have to know what the real market rate is.

Wuhan is nowhere NEAR the price you could expect in Beijing or Shanghai (the two expensive markets for educated employees). I think she was misled, unless she has an advanced degree (Master’s or better).


28 posted on 03/03/2008 9:55:38 PM PST by PugetSoundSoldier (Indignation over the sting of truth is the defense of the indefensible)
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To: underbyte

Yes, you now must help fund a retirement plan for all employees with more than 10 years employment, if your business is over a certain size (revenue, not head count).

The best deal is to be a foreign company, one based in HK - you’re free of a lot of the laws and restrictions of local companies, and can run your business with a lot lower taxes in China. Income in HK is tax free if the transactions are not completed in HK, but in China; likewise, profits for contracts signed outside of China or HK and paid directly to your HK account are tax-free in China. So with good contracts, you can run your cash into HK and pay nearly zero taxes.


29 posted on 03/03/2008 10:03:11 PM PST by PugetSoundSoldier (Indignation over the sting of truth is the defense of the indefensible)
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To: PugetSoundSoldier

I lived in Shanghai from 1996-1998. How long have you been there? I haven’t been there to visit since 2004 though.


30 posted on 03/04/2008 4:12:51 AM PST by GnL
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To: SeekAndFind

Japan, for all its faults, has both the USA and China beaten on this front.

The most elite universities in Japan (Tokyo, Kyoto, etc.; the former “Imperial” schools) are subsidized nationally and cost about $5000 per year. Rent in the big cities isn’t cheap but college students routinely stay afloat with 20-hour part-time work weeks.

When they get out of college, they can expect to make around Y3,000,000, or between $25-30k depending on how far the dollar has fallen as you read this.

Not a bad deal provided one has the brains to get into a national university and not be stuck at an expensive private school for triple the cost.


31 posted on 03/04/2008 6:09:05 AM PST by Shigarian
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To: GnL

Been living 1/3rd of my life there since 2005. Been working in the Ningbo-to-Nanjing corridor since 2001.

Have a nice little house about 5 km north of the Xinzhuang metro stop of line 1 (Gudai Lu exit off the A20). In fact, I’m heading back in 13 days...


32 posted on 03/04/2008 7:50:37 AM PST by PugetSoundSoldier (Indignation over the sting of truth is the defense of the indefensible)
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To: metmom

While a degree is good, it’s also important to have marketable skills to accompany it. A degree can get you noticed, but companies also look for skills relevant to the position and also experience.


33 posted on 03/04/2008 9:09:19 AM PST by Niuhuru (Don't burn a bra, burn a feminist!)
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To: PugetSoundSoldier
Have a nice little house about 5 km north of the Xinzhuang metro stop of line 1 (Gudai Lu exit off the A20).

Last I heard, a person can own a home but the land it is on is on a very long term lease (99 years, something like that).

Is that still true or can a homeowner fully own the land?

34 posted on 03/05/2008 11:40:36 AM PST by ponder life
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