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Trans-Texas Corridor
Nolan Chart ^ | March 8, 2008 | Adam Rink

Posted on 03/09/2008 1:08:26 PM PDT by Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Topic: Globalism

The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) is planning on building a new super highway system called the Trans-Texas Corridor (TTC). The Trans-Texas Corridor will not be just another interstate and will it will be used by more than just automobiles. It will include 10 lanes for traffic, two high speed rail tracks, four standard rail tracks, utility lines, oil pipelines, and gas pipelines.

The Trans-Texas Corridor will consist of many corridors segments that are 1,200 feet wide, with each mile consuming 146 acres of land. This land is currently ranch and farm land that is being taken by eminent domain. Eminent domain is a law where the government can take land for the public good. The owner of that property is compensated at current market rates. It is estimated that 580,000 acres (906 square miles) will be taken from private owners and given to the state for the Trans-Texas Corridor. Property owners that own land near the corridor could also see their property values decrease. As the land decreases in value or changes hands to the state, local communities will lose property tax revenue. Also, if the project is funded privately, then lands will be taken away from individuals and leased to private investors or corporations. The government should not be involved in wealth distribution.

The Trans-Texas Corridor will cost an estimated 184 billion dollars. Currently, Texas is seeking private investment to fund the Trans-Texas Corridor. Cintra, a Spanish firm, is the largest financer so far. They will build, design and operate the highway. If private funding is insufficient, Texas could use public funding. Texas is actively seeking federal funding for part of the project, but Representatives like Ron Paul have submitted bills trying to block this federal funding. Most of the Trans-Texas Corridor road access will be toll roads. Toll road earnings will be used to pay investors and to maintain the roads. If public money is used to pay for part of the TTC it would become double taxation. Motorists would have to pay for tolls and pay for the road with gasoline tax revenues.

Most of the Trans-Texas Corridor roads will have limited access. This means that the Corridor will bypass many of the communities it runs through with no on-ramps or off-ramps; thus, many local communities will not benefit. Communities that depend on travel dollars will see some of that traffic siphoned off by the TTC. The proposed plan is for restaurants, gas stations and hotels that accompany the TTC to be state contracted concessions located within the corridor.

Proponents think that the Trans-Texas Corridor will be a national model that will increase highway efficiency. This will be achieved by reducing current congestion and allowing for faster and safer transportation of freight and people. Current congestion in cities will be decreased because traffic on the TTC will be routed around major cities. High speed rail and better traffic flow will lead to less pollution. Faster transportation could reduce the costs of goods for consumers. Proponents also assume that by using a fee based model most of the upkeep costs of the system will be paid for by usage.

Opponents believe that this is the start of the North American Union highway system. They believe this is a system which will provide cheaper transportation of goods from Mexico; thus, enabling more jobs to move to Mexico. Recently Mexico has made investments to improve their ports. They are spending $200 million to expand Mexico's deepest port, Lazaro, Cardenas. Lazaro, Cardenas is 900 miles south of Laredo, Texas. Considering Mexico dock workers make $12 a day and the port fees are lower, it would make sense to bring shipments to a port that is only a short distance from the US border, such as Punta Colonet. Punta Colonet, 150 miles south of the California border, is expected to become a super port. Part of the proposed 5 billion dollar investment into Punta Colonet includes a railway into the US. If Mexico introduces a highway system at the border that transports goods faster, the idea of shipping into and out of Mexico becomes very feasible for many businesses.

Los Angeles' Port is running out of capacity, shipping nearly 14.2 million TEUs (units used to measure container traffic) a year. The Punta Colonet port is expected to be able to handle 5 million TEUs. The Lazaro port is expected to handle 500,000 TEUs a year. A few million TEUs going to Mexico might not seem like a lot when Los Angeles, the busiest port in America, handles over 14 million. It would be better if other US cities handled those containers. The Baja peninsula in Mexico has a lot of potential for deep water ports with over 3,000 acres of backland off the beach. If development in Mexico expands and has the right transportation system on land, the container business could rapidly move south. Dock workers in California and Texas could suffer as competition from Mexico grows. Businesses that support the importing of goods will also be affected.

The biggest slap in the face is that the state has developed the Texas Trans-Corridor bill, HB 3588, out of public eye. A closed door meeting hashed out the 100 page bill. Then the bill creating the TTC was signed by Governor Perry with no media attention. Closed door meetings have taken place to discuss where the branches of the corridors will run. For the TTC 69 corridor (project to run along I-69), the local Chamber of Commerce businesses were invited but not the taxpaying public. The Trans-Texas Corridor needs to involve the public. It is private land that will be ripped from the owner's and given to the state to be run by corporations. If the Tran-Texas Corridor is built, the public could lose jobs and property value because of the; therefore, it only makes sense to involve them.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Editorial; Foreign Affairs; Government; Mexico; News/Current Events; US: Texas
KEYWORDS: bajacalifornia; ca; california; cintra; congestion; cuespookymusic; deepwaterports; doubletaxation; eminentdomain; farmers; freight; fueltax; gasolinetax; gastax; globalism; goods; hb3588; highspeedrail; i69ttc; imports; jobs; landowners; lazarocardenas; losangeles; mexico; naftasuperhighway; nau; northamericanunion; p3; politics; pollution; ports; ppp; privatefunding; privateinvestment; propertytaxes; publicfunding; puntacolonet; ranchers; rickperry; ronpaul; superports; taxes; texas; tinfoil; tolling; tollroads; tolls; tollways; traffic; transportation; transtexascorridor; ttc; ttc35; ttc69; tx; txdot

1 posted on 03/09/2008 1:08:26 PM PDT by Tolerance Sucks Rocks
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To: TxDOT; 1066AD; 185JHP; Abcdefg; Adrastus; Alamo-Girl; antivenom; AprilfromTexas; B4Ranch; B-Chan; ..

Trans-Texas Corridor PING!


2 posted on 03/09/2008 1:09:21 PM PDT by Tolerance Sucks Rocks (Cloverfield 2008! Why vote for a lesser monster?)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Just exactly where will they put it without destroying the areas it goes through?


3 posted on 03/09/2008 1:11:52 PM PDT by buffyt (NObama!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Coyotes are pleased.


4 posted on 03/09/2008 1:12:15 PM PDT by mtbopfuyn (The fence is "absolutely not the answer" - Gov. Rick Perry (R, TX))
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

same debate when they developed I-70 and other parts of the interstate highway system. Ron Paul against it, good for KCMO? hmmm. sounds okay to me.


5 posted on 03/09/2008 1:17:40 PM PDT by Mercat (To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God. Micah 6:8)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Personally I’m supportive of the broad idea of the TTC as a means to really planning and building an infrastructure that’ll be efficient and lasting. I’ved lived in areas like Southern California, Utah, Chicagoland and Northern Virginia where lack-of-planning has resulted in horrendous congestion. This congestion has taken away alot of my freedom of time, my freedom of money (i.e. spending on gas in an idle car) and freedom of life. I think the TTC will be a good means in the long run towards providing a better quality of life for people in Texas (and those who travel across Texas). I wish all state DOT(s) were as visionary as the Texans’.


6 posted on 03/09/2008 1:24:01 PM PDT by Degaston
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To: Degaston

What is not being told is the story behind this Trans-highway. It is designed to be a Mexico to Canada highway designed to supply goods being brought into the new Mexican super port from China. By bringing in all the Chinese junk to Mexico, all that shipping that usually comes into our West Coast ports will now come in to Meixco, and there go thousands of longshoremen and related American trucking jobs. The Mexican trucks coming in from Mexico will be uninspected, and the first stop is supposed to be Kansas City. Of course there will be lots of pull-offs along the way where the trucks can pull over to drop off their loads of drugs and illegals. This will be Jorge Bush’s final gift to America. More jobs and advantages for his Mexican pals, and one last chance to screw American workers and jobs.


7 posted on 03/09/2008 1:30:33 PM PDT by holyscroller (A wise man's heart directs him toward the right, but the foolish man's heart directs him to the left)
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To: Degaston

It would be good to get the 18 wheelers OFF OUR ROADS.


8 posted on 03/09/2008 1:34:33 PM PDT by buffyt (Obama raises more money in ten minutes than most workers make in a YEAR! and he picks on CEOs)
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To: Degaston

The TTC has nothing to do with alleviating congestion.

Only naive people would buy that line of cow manure.

It is all about the creation of the North American Superstate and the end of the United States as a sovereign nation.


9 posted on 03/09/2008 1:34:49 PM PDT by Emperor Palpatine ("There is no civility, only politics.")
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To: Emperor Palpatine; RainMan

See post #7


10 posted on 03/09/2008 1:38:20 PM PDT by holyscroller (A wise man's heart directs him toward the right, but the foolish man's heart directs him to the left)
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To: Emperor Palpatine; holyscroller

Kudos to you both, you both got it right.

If this deal were on the up-and-up, it wouldn’t have been done in secret, via smoke-filled backrooms and a lot of “wink-winking”.

Despite the TxDOT’s push for it, Lt. Gov. Dewhurst has called their bluff and heard the majority of Texans who have attended TxDOT’s community meetings. The majority of Texans attending those meetings around the state have spoken out in opposition the the TTC, but TxDOT has gone selectively deaf and refuses to listen to the taxpayers.

The TTC is just another manifestation of the fact that government - at ALL levels - is out of control. If we don’t act quickly to reign them in, we will lose every vestige of being a free republic and will, instead, become the United Gulag of America.


11 posted on 03/09/2008 1:59:16 PM PDT by DustyMoment (FloriDUH - proud inventors of pregnant/hanging chads and judicide!!)
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To: DustyMoment
If this deal were on the up-and-up, it wouldn’t have been done in secret, via smoke-filled backrooms and a lot of “wink-winking”.

You mean like the Bush-Kennedy-McCain non-amnesty amnesty bill last summer???

12 posted on 03/09/2008 2:17:56 PM PDT by E. Cartman (Huckaboob will never be Vice President.)
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To: E. Cartman
You mean like the Bush-Kennedy-McCain non-amnesty amnesty bill last summer???

EXACTLY like that!!

13 posted on 03/09/2008 2:20:31 PM PDT by DustyMoment (FloriDUH - proud inventors of pregnant/hanging chads and judicide!!)
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To: DustyMoment
"The majority of Texans attending those meetings around the state have spoken out in opposition the the TTC, but TxDOT has gone selectively deaf and refuses to listen to the taxpayers."

That's because they are not required to get anyone's permission. All they have to do is give notice. That's what the public meetings are for . . . to gauge the level of Public Relations needed to soothe the herd.

14 posted on 03/09/2008 2:47:31 PM PDT by Eastbound
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To: Degaston

“ersonally I’m supportive of the broad idea of the TTC as a means to really planning and building an infrastructure that’ll be efficient and lasting.”

I feel the same way coming from Atlanta. The article does not mention the route of the corridor. Better transportation infrastructure will do more to reduce dependence on foreign oil than burning our food.


15 posted on 03/09/2008 2:57:14 PM PDT by bukkdems (Muslims, not rednecks, marry first cousins. http://www.consang.net/index.php/Global_prevalence)
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To: DustyMoment

Concur.


16 posted on 03/09/2008 7:53:14 PM PDT by Eastbound
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Proponents also assume that by using a fee based model most of the upkeep costs of the system will be paid for by usage.

Here we go with those unfounded "ASSUMPTIONS" again.

TxDOT has"assumed" that we would go along with their scheme. TxDOT has "assumed" that we would gladly hand over our property so they could lease it to Cintra-Zachry for profit. TxDOT has "assumed" we will be willing to pay to use this boondoggle.

TxDOT "assumed" wrong.

17 posted on 03/09/2008 11:27:57 PM PDT by Sarajevo (You're just jealous because the voices only talk to me.)
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To: buffyt

Was that sarcasm? Those 18 Wheelers pay a lot of road taxes to transport goods into and across our state. Toll roads will only increase the prices the consumer pays.


18 posted on 03/09/2008 11:34:10 PM PDT by Sarajevo (You're just jealous because the voices only talk to me.)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Come on we been told for months that this is not true!:)


19 posted on 03/09/2008 11:48:24 PM PDT by restornu ( God provides what one could not, not what one, would not!)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

BTTT


20 posted on 03/10/2008 4:29:24 AM PDT by E.G.C.
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To: buffyt

How about Arizona?


21 posted on 03/10/2008 4:44:23 AM PDT by wolfcreek (Powers that be will lie like Clintons and spend like drunken McCains to push their Globalist agenda.)
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To: Degaston
I think the TTC will be a good means in the long run towards providing a better quality of life for people in Texas (and those who travel across Texas). I wish all state DOT(s) were as visionary as the Texans’.,

The vast majority of Texans don't want the TTC. They see it for what it is, a government land grab and a financial boondoggle in the making!
22 posted on 03/10/2008 6:46:11 AM PDT by TexanByBirth (Now that the Texas primary is over, would all yall from out-of-state please go away!)
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