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The rising cost of food
BBC News Magazine ^ | Monday, 10 March 2008 | Finlo Rohrer

Posted on 03/10/2008 9:24:06 PM PDT by fishhound

Global stocks of wheat are plummeting and people are starting to worry about the price of staples like bread. But can you beat the commodity market by growing your own?

Look out your back window. How's the grass?

If you've got a garden at all, it might be that the grass is an unloved scrub as sparse as Elton John's hair used to be. Or it could be a lush strip of glorious verdure. Either way, the odds are you're not getting much use out of it. Wouldn't it be great if you could improve your health, help the environment and at the same time do your part to fight inflation?

The world is running dangerously low on wheat, one of civilisation's original staple foods. Drought in Australia and China and a switch to meat in the newly prosperous parts of the world are putting the squeeze on wheat. Prices are at a record high.

Baker and organic food campaigner Andrew Whitley believes the answer lies in your back garden and that it's time, as he puts it, to "bake your lawn". He is launching the Real Bread Campaign.

"If wheat makes bread why not grow bread just like you grow vegetables. We think of it as being a massive prairie-style enterprise but it is just a plant like anything else. It's like grass.

"There are few things that give greater satisfaction than being able to grow something and harvest it and share it with friends and family."

(Excerpt) Read more at news.bbc.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: growyourown; wheat
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This seems a stretch.
1 posted on 03/10/2008 9:24:08 PM PDT by fishhound
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To: fishhound

The thought of Elton John’s hair causes me to lose my appetite.


2 posted on 03/10/2008 9:27:24 PM PDT by BenLurkin
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To: fishhound

not enough land to make a huge difference
tomatoes, cukes, one thing, but growing wheat? Not enough soil.


3 posted on 03/10/2008 9:29:03 PM PDT by television is just wrong
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To: BenLurkin

author must be a fan.
what a bad metaphor.


4 posted on 03/10/2008 9:32:13 PM PDT by fishhound
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To: fishhound

Democrats DEMANDED for years that we put FOOD into our gas tanks. Now, they whine about rising fuel prices.

You just cannot win with these people...


5 posted on 03/10/2008 9:32:35 PM PDT by tcrlaf (VOTE DEMOCRAT-You'll look great in a Burka!)
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To: fishhound

Sounds like WWII Victory gardens! Stop using corn for bio fuel.


6 posted on 03/10/2008 9:33:34 PM PDT by Anti-Bubba182
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To: television is just wrong

Wheat is easy to grow but it isn’t easy to process and then bake your own bread.

I don’t know if the time is now but I’ve always said that farmers were going to get respect again someday.


7 posted on 03/10/2008 9:34:05 PM PDT by tiki (True Christians will not deliberately slander or misrepresent others or their beliefs)
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To: fishhound
Just smacks of the incremental de-evolution idiocy that's been going on for decades. They won't stop until we're living in holes and sponge bathing with rainwater
8 posted on 03/10/2008 9:35:20 PM PDT by SpaceBar
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To: tcrlaf

I think the dems would offer gas subsidy chits like gov cheese if they think it will get them voters.


9 posted on 03/10/2008 9:35:25 PM PDT by fishhound
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To: SpaceBar

“They won’t stop until we’re living in holes and sponge bathing with rainwater”

And don’t forget you will be ordered to turn in your matches.
Can’t have poor people living in cold holes while yours is well lit and warm making such a big carbon footprint. That would teach the children injustice!


10 posted on 03/10/2008 9:39:51 PM PDT by fishhound
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To: fishhound

You need some serious acreage to grow wheat.

By far, the best yielding crop there is also happens to be one of my favorites - good ol taters.

And if you have 3 foot by 3 foot piece of ground, you can grow enough lettuce to choak a goat - it’s a freakin weed!

Maters! Also easy to grow and good yields.

If you absolutely must have bread, buy some flour and yeast and figure out a way to freeze it.


11 posted on 03/10/2008 9:45:23 PM PDT by djf (She's filing her nails while they're draggin the lake....)
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To: djf

I did my taters in raised frames(2 levels) last year.
Just popped off the frames and didn’t have to dig much at all.

Know a guy whos daughter grows them in bails of hay or hay in a frame.


12 posted on 03/10/2008 9:51:32 PM PDT by fishhound
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To: fishhound

We don’t eat bread anymore. Husband is diabetic and can’t have carbs/starches/sugar. But we love growing our own veggies. Our tomato plants are doing well already.


13 posted on 03/10/2008 9:51:47 PM PDT by buffyt (Glowbull warming - Climate Change - the biggest hoax/fraud/deception of the 21st century.)
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To: fishhound

We can’t eat potaotes either! darn it


14 posted on 03/10/2008 9:52:14 PM PDT by buffyt (Glowbull warming - Climate Change - the biggest hoax/fraud/deception of the 21st century.)
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To: fishhound

bring on higher food prices; food subsidies have kept the price of food too low, and we have a nation where even our poorest are overweight.


15 posted on 03/10/2008 9:55:23 PM PDT by socalgop
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To: buffyt

Your husband must have a very serious type of diabetes.

I know that planning out diet is difficult with this.


16 posted on 03/10/2008 9:57:04 PM PDT by fishhound
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To: fishhound

Were screwed. Basic bread is almost up 300% here. and no you cant make it cheaper.

The only answer is to use food for food vice ethanol.
Lets get drilling and build some pebble bed reactors


17 posted on 03/10/2008 9:57:52 PM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: tcrlaf
"You just cannot win with these people..."

It's all about submission, domination, control and destruction.

Every enemy of common, loving sense has used different tactics, but desired the same result .. absolute power.

No different than Satan in the bible, the people building the tower and etc.

Draw your own conclusion(s)

We have the TM to repair this.

18 posted on 03/10/2008 9:58:19 PM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true.)
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To: All

Cut out the middle man bakery. Easiest bread to make is tortillas, both flour and corn, plus Indian Fry Bread. Settlers in this country lived on Indian Fry Bread for years. Dessert was Indian Fry Bread with sugar and cinnamon or with honey.


19 posted on 03/10/2008 9:59:05 PM PDT by Marcella (Will work in my rose garden (with wine) and not listen to McCain.)
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To: socalgop

“and we have a nation where even our poorest are overweight.”

I see that and it really makes me wonder. I think some people eat a lot of preservative filled crap.


20 posted on 03/10/2008 10:00:24 PM PDT by fishhound
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To: mylife

Basic bread is almost up 300% here???

Really?


21 posted on 03/10/2008 10:05:54 PM PDT by fishhound
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To: djf
"If you absolutely must have bread, buy some flour and yeast and figure out a way to freeze it."

Flour is on sale at Safeway through tomorrow. Four five pound bags of Gold Medal for $5.00. ($1.25/bag) I bought four, made room on a shelf in my freezer, and have room for more.

I suspect that there will be a flour shortage in the not too distant future.

22 posted on 03/10/2008 10:05:58 PM PDT by yorkie (The FEW. The PROUD. The MARINES. Semper Fi)
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To: fishhound

89c to $2.45

gotta go to bed. cyall, discuss


23 posted on 03/10/2008 10:07:15 PM PDT by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: yorkie

How did you seal it?


24 posted on 03/10/2008 10:07:19 PM PDT by fishhound
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To: mylife

Thanks for posting that.


25 posted on 03/10/2008 10:07:54 PM PDT by fishhound
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To: Marcella

You can buy those little packs of corn muffin mix. They will last quite a while, and are good substitutes for bread if you feel like it.

I recommend to everyone to buy some bulk food NOW!

Buy 20 (or 100 if you feel like it) pounds of raw beans and rice and stash it in a few of those 18 gallon plastic containers. I’m serious here, because if there is a major disruption of the supply/transport cycles, the supermarket shelves could easily be bare in hours.

Get some bulk sugar, tomato paste/sauce, and pasta while you’re at it.

Simple stuff like Top Ramens recently went from like 12 for a buck here to 8 for two dollars.

Whatever figures the government is handing out about inflation is a flat out lie.


26 posted on 03/10/2008 10:10:09 PM PDT by djf (She's filing her nails while they're draggin the lake....)
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To: yorkie

I haven’t fired up a horizontal freezer I got. I have been buying sugar in 10lb bags.

If flour is freezable I could by it in tens or greater.


27 posted on 03/10/2008 10:10:55 PM PDT by fishhound
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To: yorkie

Thanks! I’m not sure if I got room, there’s like half a black angus in my freezer as it is!

I store pastas and beans and rice and spices. Also tomato sauce, which, because of the acids in it, has a shelf life of like forever!

And you can get those boxed PastaRoni fettuccinis for like a buck apiece, and twenty of them don’t take up alot of room.

Over the years, I just buy a few dollars more each time than the things I need. It’s added up pretty good, there’s about 12 of those 18 gallon plastic thingies full of all kinds of stuff. Easily enough to keep me going for 8 months or so. And that would be if I didn’t catch and eat the various panfish (or ducks) in the lakes nearby.


28 posted on 03/10/2008 10:18:11 PM PDT by djf (She's filing her nails while they're draggin the lake....)
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To: fishhound

Don’t forget the yeast!


29 posted on 03/10/2008 10:22:39 PM PDT by djf (She's filing her nails while they're draggin the lake....)
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To: djf

I got yeast , froze it and when i made bread thought that the freezing had somehow weakened it...
Do you know if freezing damages it?


30 posted on 03/10/2008 10:30:21 PM PDT by fishhound
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To: fishhound

Yeast has got a pretty good shelf life. It has the live yeast in it, also some yeast type spores.

Just like anything, it does degrade over time. If it were more than 18 months old or so, I’d mix it with a bit of sugar water and let it sit for a day or so. That would let the surviving living yeast and spores to multiply maybe millionsfold before you mix it in to bake with it.


31 posted on 03/10/2008 10:34:21 PM PDT by djf (She's filing her nails while they're draggin the lake....)
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To: djf
Multiply your bulk food poundage recommendations by ten and that's what I have (all packed with oxygen absorbers, though).

I had heard that Walmart and Costco were out of large bags of flour so I went to check for myself. Maybe they're out some places, but here they were just low. Walmart had thee 25 lb bags; normal would be about 10, I think.

32 posted on 03/10/2008 10:35:54 PM PDT by steve86 (Acerbic by nature, not nurture™)
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To: steve86

Good deal. I assume you have the energy supplies and bulk water stashed also.

There’s currently only one of me, so I feel pretty safe. But in the case of emergency, I would obviously have to barter some of it to team up with some people...

(I also have a few pounds of tobacco stashed!!)


33 posted on 03/10/2008 10:41:21 PM PDT by djf (She's filing her nails while they're draggin the lake....)
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To: djf

If I may make a suggestion - powdered milk. I buy a box every month or two, and store it on dry shelves. It has a long shelf life, and is a good source of protein. (Especially nice, if you have bought extra boxes of cereal and graham crackers.)

Extra charcoal is another thing I have bought.

I had a reverse osmosis water filter installed a year ago, and it sure has come in handy.

I make my own noodles and freeze them. I’ll trade you homemade noodles for some of that angus. (You need the room - remember?) ;-)


34 posted on 03/10/2008 10:41:49 PM PDT by yorkie (The FEW. The PROUD. The MARINES. Semper Fi)
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To: djf

Sounds like you know all about sourdough and add a little flour, you have a sourdough starter! Best pancakes and bread in the world. (IMHO, of course!)


35 posted on 03/10/2008 10:45:46 PM PDT by yorkie (The FEW. The PROUD. The MARINES. Semper Fi)
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To: yorkie

powdered milk

I went to buy that ...I was surprised how expensive it is.


36 posted on 03/10/2008 10:46:39 PM PDT by fishhound
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To: fishhound
They won’t stop until we’re living in holes and sponge bathing with rainwater.

But they will tax you for the rainwater. At least that is what they have tried to do for the last 2 years here in Washington state. Unbelievable, yes, in a state where we are known for our annual rainfall. Our legislators have tried to put a tax on collecting rainwater.

37 posted on 03/10/2008 10:46:39 PM PDT by Vicki (Washington State where anyone can vote .... illegals, non-residents, dead people, dogs, felons)
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To: Vicki

“But they will tax you for the rainwater. At least that is what they have tried to do for the last 2 years here in Washington state. Unbelievable, yes, in a state where we are known for our annual rainfall. Our legislators have tried to put a tax on collecting rainwater.”

That is just outrageous!!!!!!!!!


38 posted on 03/10/2008 10:49:11 PM PDT by fishhound
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To: fishhound

I know! But, I don’t think it’s going to get any cheaper - so buy a little at a time. You may be glad you did, one day. (Hopefully, it’s only to make french toast, when you can’t get to the store, and have plenty of eggs but no milk.)


39 posted on 03/10/2008 10:51:20 PM PDT by yorkie (The FEW. The PROUD. The MARINES. Semper Fi)
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To: Anti-Bubba182

Instead of “victory gardens” we can call them “recession rows to hoe” or “hard-time hothouses” or “poorhouse patch”


40 posted on 03/10/2008 10:54:38 PM PDT by ClarenceThomasfan (Don't be a kamikoze Conservative! Vote Republican in 2008!)
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To: yorkie

I work at it slowly.
I know an old timer who says “If I have to, I can shut my door for three months”...no one ever said that to me before.
I do find it difficult to go through stuff and revolve it out and I miss dates and have to sometimes throw stuff out.


41 posted on 03/10/2008 10:56:03 PM PDT by fishhound
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To: mylife

I’m in Fort Worth and basic white sandwich bread is still under a dollar at Kroger and Wal-Mart.


42 posted on 03/10/2008 10:58:51 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet (http://www.fourfriedchickensandacoke.blogspot.com)
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To: Vicki

I hadn’t heard that.

But it wouldn’t raise much revenue anyway on my dry side of the state.


43 posted on 03/10/2008 11:02:47 PM PDT by steve86 (Acerbic by nature, not nurture™)
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To: fishhound

I tend to think that alot of the expiration dates on food (except for like dairy) are grossly underexaggerated.

I mean a bean is a bean is a bean. Heck, they’ve planted beans and lentils and stuff they found buried with the Pharaohs.

And alot of them grew fine.


44 posted on 03/10/2008 11:11:39 PM PDT by djf (She's filing her nails while they're draggin the lake....)
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To: fishhound

I can vouch for flour freezing well. For years I have bought large bags of flour when on sale and kept it in the freezer. I find if you plan to make bread with it, you need to let the flour come to room temp for best results. Yeast can also be frozen for quite a while, and also needs to be warmed to use of course- I have kept both for well over a year. Yeast is a bargain at warehouse stores in large bags.

We live pretty remote and always keep large quantity of staples around in case of bad weather or what ever. Things like beans and rice I will repackage in using portions into the food saver vacuum bags- you can also stash a lot of food in garbage cans and if space is a problem cut a plywood round for the top of the garbage can and cover with a nice cloth- presto decorator table w/storage. The real key to bulk food storage is to rotate food constantly keeping track of how it is doing- some of the vacuum bags seals will fail and if you are keeping track you can just use those items pretty soon. I also keep seeds stored, like corn and other veggies. We usually eat frozen or fresh veggies, but I do stock up on canned when they are really on sale- just in case.


45 posted on 03/10/2008 11:14:55 PM PDT by Tammy8 (Please Support and pray for our Troops, as they serve us every day.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

I am so happy to be back in WA where they remember how
to bake real bread - Columbia Bakery!

On the other hand, the supposedly Seattle’s best BarBQ
place Stans in Issaquah is an abomination. What I wouldn’t give for a chance to get to a Spring Creek, or to Clarks,
or the Shady Oak...


46 posted on 03/10/2008 11:25:03 PM PDT by rahbert
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To: Tammy8; fishhound; djf; Vicki

Something else I am doing; dehydrating fresh produce.

It is amazing how much you can store in baggies, after dehydration.

I have mushrooms, celery, onions, green pepper, fresh herbs, bananas, apples, and potatoes.

And, that vacuum sealer, Tammy, is the best invention since the electric hair curler. LOL! I love mine!


47 posted on 03/10/2008 11:34:34 PM PDT by yorkie (The FEW. The PROUD. The MARINES. Semper Fi)
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To: yorkie

Do you use a dehydrator or the sun? I tried a dehydrator years ago and thought it was a pain- I suppose they are better now. If you use one what kind do you like? Is it real time consuming- tell me more...

We really like to make jerky, and that is what I wanted the dehydrator for- but it seemed easier to do using the sun than the dehydrator. I truly haven’t done fruit and veggies in the dehydrator but should.


48 posted on 03/10/2008 11:52:25 PM PDT by Tammy8 (Please Support and pray for our Troops, as they serve us every day.)
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To: buffyt
I can't even get to my veggie beds because of the snow!..and you've got tomatoes growing already....

living in a northern state is fantastic but you do have less leeway in your garden...

however, onions, tomatoes, cukes, beans, peppers and jalopenos, garlic, etc grow well..garlic is particularly easy to grow (put it in the ground!)

49 posted on 03/11/2008 12:04:19 AM PDT by cherry
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To: djf

I bought a 25# of rice the other day at Costco, and I buy the large cans of plain tomatoe sauce at $1.89/can and keep several on hand....buy the large cans of tuna..good savings....I’ve been buying canned corn in the #10 cans as well....anything that will keep, I try to buy....including soaps, plastic wrap, etc.


50 posted on 03/11/2008 12:07:35 AM PDT by cherry
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