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Ordinance Allows Workers On Private Property To Kill Africanized Bees
Local 6 News ^ | 3-19-2008

Posted on 03/19/2008 8:07:22 AM PDT by Cagey

STUART, Fla. -- A Florida County has declared war on killer bees.

Commissioners in Martin County have unanimously passed an ordinance allowing county employees to go onto private property without permission to kill Africanized bees and treat areas where mosquitoes are breeding.

The county's mosquito control administrator Gene Lemire said the county already responds to bee and mosquito complaints with the permission of property owners.

But he said they have had an increasing number of incidents in which property owners either cannot be found or are unwilling to clean up the infestation themselves.

Killer bees, which Lemire said have been moving into Martin County, are more aggressive than regular European honey bees and will chase people farther to sting them when a hive is disturbed.


TOPICS: Government; US: Florida
KEYWORDS: bees; pests

1 posted on 03/19/2008 8:07:22 AM PDT by Cagey
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To: Cagey

THAT’S RACIST!!!!!....................


2 posted on 03/19/2008 8:12:36 AM PDT by Red Badger ( We don't have science, but we do have consensus.......)
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To: Cagey

Seems to me that with the current honey bee problem the world is having... that Africanized bees are better than NO bees....


3 posted on 03/19/2008 8:13:03 AM PDT by Rick.Donaldson (http://www.transasianaxis.com - Please visit for lastest on DPRK/Russia/China/et al.)
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To: Cagey

4 posted on 03/19/2008 8:13:59 AM PDT by wastedyears (More Maiden coming up in a few months!)
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To: Cagey

Aw, too bad. At first I thought it read “Ordnance” and I thought that could be really fun.


5 posted on 03/19/2008 8:14:40 AM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: Rick.Donaldson
EXCEPT...


6 posted on 03/19/2008 8:14:48 AM PDT by Virginia Ridgerunner ("We must not forget that there is a war on and our troops are in the thick of it!"--Duncan Hunter)
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To: Rick.Donaldson

To BEE or NOT to BEE. THAT is the question..................


7 posted on 03/19/2008 8:15:09 AM PDT by Red Badger ( We don't have science, but we do have consensus.......)
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To: Virginia Ridgerunner
ALSO...


8 posted on 03/19/2008 8:19:01 AM PDT by Virginia Ridgerunner ("We must not forget that there is a war on and our troops are in the thick of it!"--Duncan Hunter)
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To: Rick.Donaldson
>>that Africanized bees are better than NO bees....<<

Having had Africanized bees set up housekeeping in some old tires in one of my old barns, and having been stung numerous times when trying to mow around these buggers, I respectfully disagree.


9 posted on 03/19/2008 8:22:03 AM PDT by Muleteam1
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To: Cagey

And I suppose the workers will leave a bill for their unrequested service.


10 posted on 03/19/2008 8:27:58 AM PDT by Old Professer (The critic writes with rapier pen, dips it twice, and writes again.)
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To: Cagey

Leaving aside the question of property rights, how will the county workers distinguish between Africanized bees and the usual honey bee varieties of Italian or Carnolian to name but two? It takes a lab test to make the distinction. You cannot tell if a honey bee is an Africanized bee just by looking at it. I suppose the only way would be to observe the bees to determine their aggression level but even native bees can get riled up for a time.


11 posted on 03/19/2008 8:35:52 AM PDT by miele man (Continually voting against iodine deficient libs for 42 years)
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To: WorkingClassFilth

ping Thought you should see this.


12 posted on 03/19/2008 8:36:59 AM PDT by miele man (Continually voting against iodine deficient libs for 42 years)
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To: Rick.Donaldson

Seems to me that with the current honey bee problem the world is having... that Africanized bees are better than NO bees....””

Think we might be comparing apples and oranges here.
Honey bees are regularly moved from one area of the country to another, following the weather and pollinating the various crops, from north to south, etc.
It is my understanding that the killer bees are so aggressive that one cannot move colonies and set them up in new places. Also, they don’t produce honey of a commercial quality nor quantity.
Introducing them to areas of the country that so far don’t have them would also be a disaster.


13 posted on 03/19/2008 9:01:48 AM PDT by ridesthemiles
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To: Cagey

Sounds like the same response they had for the citrus canker. If you had a private citrus tree on your property and it was within 1900 feet of an identified and infected tree, workers would come on your property without your permission and totally destroy your tree, regardless of whether it was identified as having canker or not. Your government and big industry (citrus in this case) at your service...


14 posted on 03/19/2008 9:02:45 AM PDT by Dubh_Ghlase (In the land of Clinton, where the shadows lie...)
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To: Rick.Donaldson

> Seems to me that with the current honey bee problem the world is having... that Africanized bees are better than NO bees....
Amen !!


15 posted on 03/19/2008 9:13:21 AM PDT by BuffaloJack
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To: Muleteam1

Respectfully disagree all you like.

The point here is that bees provide pollination to something close to 80% of our food products, in particular flowering plants and trees.

Without bees, we will still have some minor, natural pollination going on, but nothing like what bees do. The cost of foods, especially fruits will increase drastically, across the US and around the world, becoming more and more scarce as trees and plants die because they aren’t being pollinated.

Bees, are bees, and they all do the same job. Africanized bees are more hardy than European bees and they aren’t dying off like the normal bees you’re used to. The fact is that africanized bees will in time become more docile - and just need the time to do so. They still produce honey, and they still do the same job as other bees do.

I don’t have a problem with them being removed from human habitation, but I do have a problem with their extermination.


16 posted on 03/19/2008 9:45:46 AM PDT by Rick.Donaldson (http://www.transasianaxis.com - Please visit for lastest on DPRK/Russia/China/et al.)
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To: ridesthemiles

No, I’m not “comparing apples to oranges”. I’m comparing bees to bees.

The bee population on this entire planet has been afflicted by something - which scientists are so far at a loss to explain, causing mass dying of bees. Theories range from viruses and parasites to the weird (cellular phones causing it), even so, the phenomenon is occurring as we speak and billions of honey bees (the European type, which reside in the US) are dying at a very high rate.

This is a known problem. Africanized bees have not seemed to have been affected in the same way so far.

It is my belief at this point that whatever the issue is might not be reversed before all bees pretty much die off.

See my previous post for the ramifications of this problem - and I would urge people to investigate this before they start assuming that “africanized bees” are bad.


17 posted on 03/19/2008 9:49:34 AM PDT by Rick.Donaldson (http://www.transasianaxis.com - Please visit for lastest on DPRK/Russia/China/et al.)
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To: ridesthemiles

Also... I’m not sure where you got the idea they don’t produce “commercial grade honey” — ALL honey is “commercial grade” in that it can be used. Even so, AHB do produce less honey per hive, but they still produce honey, nonetheless.

The fact is that bee keepers can and do keep and control these bees.

Also note this article....
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/03/980331080426.htm


18 posted on 03/19/2008 10:07:43 AM PDT by Rick.Donaldson (http://www.transasianaxis.com - Please visit for lastest on DPRK/Russia/China/et al.)
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To: Rick.Donaldson
I found this article interesting, regarding the potential for using native bees for pollination. Of course, it will do nothing for honey production, but pollination is more important.

Honeybee populations, either because of fierce competition from Africanized honeybees or from species of mites they have no resistance to, are on the decline.

Native bees offer an alternative because they are resistant to both the varroa and tracheal mites. And because they do not live in hives, native bees are not at risk of being overcome by Africanized bees.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/03/060306094707.htm

19 posted on 03/19/2008 10:13:39 AM PDT by brytlea (amnesty--an act of clemency by an authority by which pardon is granted esp. to a group of individual)
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To: Cagey

First they came for the Africanized bees....


20 posted on 03/19/2008 10:45:06 AM PDT by Ignatz (I gave up self-sacrifice for Lent.)
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To: Cagey
I was wondering whatever happened to the killer bees. Aren't we all supposed to be dead by now? Did they take a wrong turn at the Caribbean and are now just getting here?
21 posted on 03/19/2008 11:01:01 AM PDT by maclay (America First - The rest of the world comes second)
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To: Rick.Donaldson
Sorry for my delay in reply but my ISP has been going down mid-morning for the past week.

While I agree with you on the the importance of bees for pollination purposes, Africanized bees have not been useful for commercial bee pollinators which are used to pollinate much of America's mono-agriculture. Like the coyote and the cockroach, Africanized bees are not likely to be exterminated even by well-intentioned urban lawmakers. It simply means that agriculture, and consumers, will have to adapt to changes that are sure to come in food production.

22 posted on 03/20/2008 7:45:33 AM PDT by Muleteam1
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To: Muleteam1
While I agree with you on the the importance of bees for pollination purposes, Africanized bees have not been useful for commercial bee pollinators which are used to pollinate much of America's mono-agriculture. Like the coyote and the cockroach, Africanized bees are not likely to be exterminated even by well-intentioned urban lawmakers. It simply means that agriculture, and consumers, will have to adapt to changes that are sure to come in food production.

Thanks for the response, I've been kind of busy too, and this next week I won't be around much. I'm going to visit my sister who just has surgery for breast cancer :(

My only response to this is that I don't know of any studies that verify what you're saying... and know how bees DO work, then I would say that all bees, no matter what kind they are, indeed visit flowers on plants that provide the sugars they need... and pollination is a byproduce of visiting flowers. So, I'd say that your statement, unless you can back it up with a study probably isn't wholly accurate.
23 posted on 03/20/2008 1:20:47 PM PDT by Rick.Donaldson (http://www.transasianaxis.com - Please visit for lastest on DPRK/Russia/China/et al.)
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To: Rick.Donaldson
Again I must say,sorry for my delay in replying. I had a reply prepared yesterday morning but my server crashed right in the middle of it. My reply basically said that I am a retired biologist for the USDA and etc., etc., etc. but my reply was not so important. Better that I just mention that my family's prayers are with your family as your sister faces a terrible disease. I just called my oldest sister yesterday and wished her a happy 67th birthday.

I had better get this posted before my ISP goes down again. Good talking with you.

24 posted on 03/22/2008 7:20:26 AM PDT by Muleteam1
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To: Muleteam1

Thanks for the reply, AND especially the prayers. We just arrived back in Colorado at 8 pm last night after a long week of driving all over the country.

Sis is doing well, as well as can be expected.

Being a retired biologist you probably know a lot more about bees than I do. However, I can and do accomplish the research before responding so know that I’m not just talking out of turn on this.

I have a strong vested interest in bees, and honey (I make mead for fun, and we’ve been considering a business doing this — but if it appears bees are going to go extinct or simply stop being able to produce honey then it isn’t worth the effort).

My problem is that if European bees are going to continue to die off, then I can’t see where we can’t start exploiting africanized honey bees.


25 posted on 03/31/2008 9:04:50 AM PDT by Rick.Donaldson (http://www.transasianaxis.com - Please visit for lastest on DPRK/Russia/China/et al.)
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To: Rick.Donaldson
(I make mead for fun,

Wonderful to run into another mead maker. Last batch I did was a Sparkling Maple Blueberry Mead. It was (yes, was. Sadly it's all gone) fabulous. It had the color of a purple sunset, lots of tiny champagne like bubbles, and was almost 14% ABV.

And not to quibble, but there's really no such thing as a 'native American bee'. The first bee colonies in the US were imported from Europe during colonial times. There were no bees in America prior to that.

So strictly speaking all bees in America are non-native. It's just that the European honeybee has been here much longer than the African variety which was originally brought to South America for research purposes in 1956 in a failed bid to increase Brazilian honey production. Ironic eh?

L

26 posted on 03/31/2008 9:13:13 AM PDT by Lurker (Pimping my blog: http://lurkerslair-lurker.blogspot.com/)
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