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Researcher: Discovery could end energy crisis
Tifton (GA) Gazette ^ | 3/15/2008 | Jana Cone

Posted on 03/20/2008 3:35:26 AM PDT by Neville72

A Tifton agricultural researcher says he has found the solution to the world’s energy crisis through genetic modification and cloning of bacterial organisms that can convert bio-mass into hydrocarbons on a grand scale. The local researcher believes his groundbreaking discovery could result in the production of 500 to 1,000 barrels of hydrocarbon fuel per day from the initial production facility. The hydrocarbon fuel — commonly known as oil or fossil fuel when drilled — will require no modification to automobiles, oil pipelines or refineries as they exist today and could forever end the United States’ dependence on foreign oil, he said.

J.C. Bell, who brought the world powdered peanut butter, has spent the last four years, identifying the bacteria that produces hydrocarbon and then finding a way to genetically alter it so that it could produce hydrocarbon in greater volume.

Bell cited a USDA study that projected it was possible to produce two billion tons of bio-mass that could be converted to hydrocarbon with some modification to agriculture and forestry practices.

Pamela Serino, Chief of the Department of Defense Energy Support Center at Fort Belvoir, Va., said she was very excited about Bell’s technology. “The DOD Energy Support Center is the energy purchasing arm of the defense logistics agency,” Serino said. She said she became acquainted with Bell when he met with a senator about his hydrocarbon research. “We give support to the Hill,” she said. “When he was briefing the senator, we were there to see if his technology was viable.” Serino said her job was to question the science behind the technology. “It looks good to me,” she said.

Serino said she envisions a near future where “we have multiple regional energy sources.” She said the growth in China and India makes the work in bio-energy more critical.

Now that his discoveries have been patented, his corporation formed — Bell Bio-Energy, Inc. — and his government communications established, Bell announced his discoveries to the local press on Friday morning.

“I have received a tremendous amount of support from the state and federal government,” Bell said. “I could not have gotten this far without the help of (U.S. Sen.) Saxby Chambliss, (U.S. Sen.) Johnny Isakson, (Rep.) Jim Marshall, (Rep.) Jack Kingston and Floyd Gabler, the deputy undersecretary of the USDA.” He said, “They have opened doors for me at the Department of Defense and the EPA and EPD.”

Bell said he never considered ethanol for his research. “He who burns his food goes hungry,” Bell said. “That’s an old Chinese proverb.” Instead he concentrated on bio-mass and hydrocarbons. “If it grows it’s bio-mass,” Bell said. Bio-mass is any living or recently dead biological material. Hydrocarbon is an organic compound consisting entirely of hydrogen and carbon. Decomposed organic matter provides an abundance of carbon and hydrogen and is naturally occurring in crude oil.

Sources for bio-mass to be converted to hydrocarbon fuel are the forestry industry, pulp plants, agriculture and waste derived from the construction and demolition industry.

“This is the ultimate recycling,” Bell said. “Environmentalists should rejoice. We are only using waste products.” Bell said his company would take all of the waste of the plants: The tree limbs and tree tops, husks and cob of the corn, wheat stubble and corn stover.

Bell said that with ethanol, “The United Stated would have to totally rebuild our infrastructure.” He said, “We wanted to make hydrocarbon that could immediately be pumped.”

Bell said the original idea came from observing cows expel gas. “That is natural gas,” Bell said. “Cows release methane gas.” He said the gas is created by bacteria in the cow’s rumen or stomach. “These bacterial organisms are responsible for biological conversion of bio-mass into hydrocarbons,” he said.

With his research complete, Bell is in the process of building his pilot plants and production facilities. At the pilot plants, the bio-mass will be tested to select bacterial strains, bacterial genetic modification will be tested, revision of production protocols will be established, and a determination will be made of the best method of bio-mass conversion.

“We are exploring several locations for our pilot plants and production facilities,” Bell said. “We have the opportunity to put our plants in several locations.”

He estimated the budget for the research facility to be at $60 million annually and the production facilities at $250 to $300 million a year. He anticipates being in full scale production by October 1, 2009.

“Wherever this is located, the community will reap tremendous economic benefit,” he said.

Bell cites a number of benefits of bio-mass conversion: The energy shortage issue can be effectively addressed, it is a totally renewable energy source, it calms global warming fears, utilizes industrial waste and supports the agriculture industry.

“We can reduce the waste stream by 70 percent,” he said.

For more information e-mail questions to marketing@bellplantation.com.

To contact reporter Jana Cone, call 382-4321, ext. 208.


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KEYWORDS: energy
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To: Anticommie
No car manufacturer dares to produce a PHEV cause they all are all in bed with oil companies.

2009 Toyota Prius Plug-in Hybrid Prototype: Tokyo Test Drive
http://www.popularmechanics.com/automotive/new_cars/4227944.html

What will government do without collecting the taxes imposed on gasoline? I suspect we will pay those taxes in other forms.

Government makes a lot more money on the oil industry than the typical oil company does.

51 posted on 03/20/2008 5:56:41 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Neville72
They could use this in conjunction with the 200 mpg carburetor!
52 posted on 03/20/2008 5:56:49 AM PDT by anoldafvet (To liberals, building a wall across the Mexican border is a violation of the Voting Rights Act.)
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To: Sudetenland

Who pissed in your cereal this morning dickweed.


53 posted on 03/20/2008 6:02:23 AM PDT by BubbaJunebug
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To: BubbaJunebug

Sudetenland is a bit full of himself, I read is page, he offers more derogatory than useful information in his prose.


54 posted on 03/20/2008 6:14:04 AM PDT by existtoexcel
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To: Texas Mulerider
You realize, of course, that only a select minority here understand the meaning of "gee" and "haw."

That would be the about the same number of FReepers that know the word "grits" is a three syllable word.

55 posted on 03/20/2008 6:21:53 AM PDT by N. Theknow (Kennedys: Can't drive, can't fly, can't ski, can't skipper a boat; but they know what's best for us)
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To: existtoexcel

I only denegrate fools who spread idiotic lies which would better be expressed on sites like DU and Liberals who live their lives in a fantasy world. Which are you?


56 posted on 03/20/2008 6:28:16 AM PDT by Sudetenland (I (heart) "Big Oil!")
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To: paterfamilias

“Don’t be so quick to dismiss this: who would have predicted in the 1930’s that within 10-15 years we would be setting up huge fermentation vats on an industrial scale to produce life-saving drugs called “antibiotics”?”

My opinion of the technology was based on 30 years of industrial research experience in molecular genetics and microbiology. I have done a technical evaluation of the biofuels state of the art and know what is technically possible and what is practical. I can tell you the claims being made for this technology are utterly ridiculous.


57 posted on 03/20/2008 6:30:38 AM PDT by Hacklehead (Crush the liberals, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentation of the hippies.)
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To: Robert A. Cook, PE

Hey, it could happen...


58 posted on 03/20/2008 6:34:56 AM PDT by patton (cuiquam in sua arte credendum)
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To: spanalot
it will be immense fun wtching those russian thugs devolve back into the third world status they deserve

You're not suggesting that we use the bacteria to "devolve" the thugs into oil are you?
</false alarm>

59 posted on 03/20/2008 6:38:07 AM PDT by Theophilus (Nothing can make Americans safer than to stop aborting them.)
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To: Brilliant

Funny isn’t it? Something wonderful happens in a free socity, when the price of oil hits 100$ people start scrambling all over to find alternative fuel sources...

Unless the Carter years.

BTW Obama, Hillary and the dems in general think price controls and taxing oil companies is the way to solve the energy crisis in the world.


60 posted on 03/20/2008 6:38:32 AM PDT by nikos1121 (I'm voting for McCain...and fixin' to get excited about it.:)
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To: Texas Mulerider
You realize, of course, that only a select minority here understand the meaning of "gee" and "haw."

Anyone that has read, "Call of the Wild", recognizes those terms.

OK, OK, I admit that I don't know how many have read that book.

61 posted on 03/20/2008 6:48:01 AM PDT by Just another Joe (Warning: FReeping can be addictive and helpful to your mental health)
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To: BubbaJunebug
No doubt Exxon Mobile will be at his door step today with a buy out to bury this program

Or perhaps they'll invest in it. Profit is profit.

62 posted on 03/20/2008 6:52:55 AM PDT by BfloGuy (It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker, that we can expect . . .)
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To: 11th Commandment
Environmental wackos will fight this because it still burns carbon.

But even environmentalists recognize a difference between carbon that was recently incorporated into plant life and "ancient" carbon pumped from the ground.

63 posted on 03/20/2008 6:55:33 AM PDT by BlazingArizona
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To: Brilliant
"has spent the last four years, identifying the bacteria that produces hydrocarbon and then finding a way to..."

He just needs to ID the bacteria in Dino Crap.

64 posted on 03/20/2008 7:01:07 AM PDT by Deaf Smith
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To: Hacklehead

Thanks for your reply. It’s hard to tell when reading these postings who actually has adequate background to evaluate the subject and who is just blowing CH4.

What aspect(s) of the claim do you have issue with?


65 posted on 03/20/2008 7:01:15 AM PDT by paterfamilias
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To: vietvet67

The photo is funny, but I remember seeing an article on Sciencedaily about some midwestern researchers who’d found a way to engineer e coli to produce hydrogen. I am all in favor of using bacteria to produce energy, but I think it’s very dangerous to use e coli as the base bacteria. Your photo might come true. Might also have people doing the same thing.


66 posted on 03/20/2008 7:08:24 AM PDT by Brilliant
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To: Hacklehead

I’m not questioning your professional experience. If what you say is true,why would Shell invest millions in a plant in Hawaii?


67 posted on 03/20/2008 7:10:15 AM PDT by painter
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To: Texas Mulerider

What is a good stump broke mule fetching these days?


68 posted on 03/20/2008 7:12:42 AM PDT by MileHi ( "It's coming down to patriots vs the politicians." - ovrtaxt)
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To: Texas Mulerider

And we ain’t tellin’...


69 posted on 03/20/2008 7:13:41 AM PDT by HeadOn (The Second Amendment is in place in case the politicians ignore the others.)
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To: Brilliant

Even if it works, the world burn the equivalent of ten years growth of biomass every year.

However, every new source helps.


70 posted on 03/20/2008 7:14:49 AM PDT by js1138
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To: js1138

I don’t know about that. The world produces vast quantities of biomass even without cultivation. The problem is not so much where to get the biomass as it is how to convert it economically to a usable fuel.


71 posted on 03/20/2008 7:19:49 AM PDT by Brilliant
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To: BlazingArizona
But even environmentalists recognize a difference between carbon that was recently incorporated into plant life and "ancient" carbon pumped from the ground.

WAY TOO MUCH CREDIT BROTHER!

72 posted on 03/20/2008 7:42:32 AM PDT by 11th Commandment (Elect Conservatives- if you don't vote for McCain, at least work to elect conservatives!)
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To: Brilliant
The world produces vast quantities of biomass even without cultivation.

Half of all biomass is currently eaten or used. If every bit were available for fuel, it would represent about ten percent of our energy needs.

73 posted on 03/20/2008 7:42:48 AM PDT by js1138
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To: js1138

I can’t believe that number. The world produces vast quantities of forest growth, and other plant growth from algae to the weeds in your garden. We can’t be consuming 1/2 of that.


74 posted on 03/20/2008 7:50:08 AM PDT by Brilliant
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To: Texas Mulerider
"Gee, Haw, Whoa, Back."

You realize, of course, that only a select minority here understand the meaning of "gee" and "haw."Gee, Haw, Whoa, Back.

Only the truly educated!

75 posted on 03/20/2008 7:55:58 AM PDT by BwanaNdege
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To: mosaicwolf
Excellent! I will keep my big bore V-8 Tundra!

Damn! I coulda' had a V-8

76 posted on 03/20/2008 7:59:28 AM PDT by JewishRighter (Why, oh Why can't it be Hunter???)
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To: js1138
Half of all biomass is currently eaten or used. If every bit were available for fuel, it would represent about ten percent of our energy needs.

I, too, find that VERY hard to believe!

Tell that to the folks in Florida & on Lake Victoria battling water hyacinth, or the folks in the Southeast watching kudzu overcome everything in it's path.

77 posted on 03/20/2008 8:07:13 AM PDT by BwanaNdege
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To: paterfamilias

“What aspect(s) of the claim do you have issue with?”

There are many but I will address just a couple.

They basically claim that their process can use any type of plant material and convert it to oil. There is no single organism known that can efficiently break down more than a few forms of plant material. This is a major roadblock in the production of ethanol from plant waste or grasses. You need a preprocessing step to break down the fibers to get to the cellulose. They currently use an enzyme cocktail that is expensive, time consuming, and inefficient.

Once the plant material is broken down, it must be coverted to oil. In cows the grass material is ultimately converted to cow pies and methane after the nutrients are extracted. Methane is the simplest hydrocarbon and very different from oil or even gasoline. The organisms that generate methane (called methanogens) cannot convert grass to oil, nor can any naturally occuring bacteria (and they cant be made to do so by simple genetic manipulation). There is also the problem that the organisms that make methane are very difficult to work with and are killed by the presence of oxygen so his reactions would have to be oxygen free environment (not possible on a large scale reactor).

I wont even get into the problems of collecting, transporting, handling and processing 2 billion tons of plant material. Even if the miracle organisms exist, the number and size of the reactors needed to do this conversion would make your average alcohol brewery plant look like a kiddie pool.

The techical hurdles that would have to be overcome are enormous.


78 posted on 03/20/2008 8:10:29 AM PDT by Hacklehead (Crush the liberals, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentation of the hippies.)
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To: Neville72
"The hydrocarbon fuel ...will require no modification to automobiles, oil pipelines or refineries as they exist today and could forever end the United States’ dependence on foreign oil..."

However, the federal government will continue to waste billions of dollars to develop hydrogen cars, fuel cell cars and make corn ethanol all of which require modifications to pipelines, refineries and even whole new auto technologies instead of pursuing this more rational approach.

79 posted on 03/20/2008 8:11:00 AM PDT by The Great RJ ("Mir we bleiwen wat mir sin" or "We want to remain what we are." ..Luxembourg motto)
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To: painter

“If what you say is true,why would Shell invest millions in a plant in Hawaii?”

No offense, I am happy to answer questions on this. What shell is doing is completely different from the process described in the article. Certain varieties of algae naturally produce and contain a high oil content. They use light energy to convert CO2 to oil. All you have to do is grow them and extract the oil after harvesting (which can be challenging). Its a relatively simple process as opposed to the technical nightmare Bell’s company would require.
BTW, I strongly suspect Shell is doing this as a stunt to show they are doing something green and carbon neutral.


80 posted on 03/20/2008 8:30:32 AM PDT by Hacklehead (Crush the liberals, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentation of the hippies.)
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To: BwanaNdege

You really don’t have to get to that level of detail in calculating biomass. We know how much energy the earth receives in sunlight, we know what percentage is converted to biomass by plants, and we know the quantity used.

What’s left over includes your kudzu and water weeds. I’m not including ocean biomass, which is not available for energy conversion. Maybe in some future time.

Plants convert about one tenth of one percent of solar energy into usable biomass. Even the worst solsr cells are a hundred times more efficient. I have seen arguments that genetic engineering could produce more productive plants.

I’m just saying that with current technology, biomass could not replace more than ten percent of fossil fuel.


81 posted on 03/20/2008 8:34:38 AM PDT by js1138
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To: Normandy; saganite
"Here’s the company that does that:

http://www.changingworldtech.com"

Changing World Technologies has been around for going on a decade. They do have a pilot plant in Carthage Missouri that takes in turkey offal. It uses a totally different method though than the one described here. It uses thermal conversion process, or TCP. The method is described below:

The Thermal Conversion Process, or TCP, mimics the earth’s natural geothermal process by using water, heat and pressure to transform organic and inorganic wastes into oils, gases, carbons, metals and ash. Even heavy metals are transformed into harmless oxides.

They have not been overly successful with this plant, I think primarily due to the amount of complaints and fines due to the overwhelming stench that is emitted by the plant. They've really been hamstrung by regulators in the state of Missouri and have been shut down several times and been threatened with very substantial fines.

Anyhow, they don't use any bacteria to accomplish their conversion process, just lots of heat and pressure.

82 posted on 03/20/2008 8:38:29 AM PDT by rednesss (Fred Thompson - 2008)
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To: Hacklehead

There had been a another thread on FR dealing with one of the large oil companies looking at algae to produce biodiesel - do you see the same obstacles with that type of system?


83 posted on 03/20/2008 8:46:04 AM PDT by paterfamilias
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To: paterfamilias

“There had been a another thread on FR dealing with one of the large oil companies looking at algae to produce biodiesel - do you see the same obstacles with that type of system?”

Not at all. See response 80.


84 posted on 03/20/2008 9:02:32 AM PDT by Hacklehead (Crush the liberals, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentation of the hippies.)
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To: omega4179
Does your toyota burn rice or gasoline?

Rice (imported from China)

85 posted on 03/20/2008 9:04:58 AM PDT by Anticommie
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To: Hacklehead

Sorry, I missed that. Thanks


86 posted on 03/20/2008 9:36:50 AM PDT by paterfamilias
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To: 11th Commandment
True; however, the government is against plug ins because electrical generation capacity. Californika can't produce enough electricity for air conditioners which cost LIVES, you think the government want dead old people in hot houses while people are plugging in their cars? (PHEV)which is basically an electric car with combustion engine back-up, yet no car manufacturer dares to produce one (you can buy a conversion kit though making your hybrid into a PHEV). A little off basis. Current Hybrid are parallel systems in which the gas and electric work in unison. Series system like the Chevy Volt are as how you describe. The problem is battery technology. Lithium Ion batteries are still in development for large size motors.

California can not produce enough power cause their environazi agenda crippled them for years, to bad for them, it does not mean the rest of the union has to follow those socialists losers. We can produce enough electricity (clean coal and clean nuclear) to power electric cars, if not why the excuses about "not enough battery capacity" to power practical electric car?

Secondly I am not " a little off basic" do your homework before you get into details of PHEV.

They are two systems now (Honda and Toyota), Honda has gas and electric working in unison, Toyota has a system where a hybrid is powered by electric motor only, up to 40 mph.

It only takes to add another pack of batteries to make it an electric car with gasoline back up capable of driving about 40 miles on purely electric power, thats what average American drives in 1 day around a town.
There is an American company producing kits for Toyota Prious and other hybrids which make it possible.

The kit is expensive, but the price would come down if the car manufacturers got to it, they just DON'T WANT TO, CAUSE THEY ARE IN BED WITH OIL COMPANIES. This is not a fantasy google PHEV and find it yourself.

Most of the public falls for the government, car and oil companies propaganda, being fed with utopia of biofuels, hydrogen cells and similar promises which are pure bs.

As far as GM they are will go bankrupt 3 times before they develop anything useful unless Governement bails them out.

87 posted on 03/20/2008 9:49:05 AM PDT by Anticommie
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To: Anticommie

How much does it cost to Convert a Prius to a plug in?


88 posted on 03/20/2008 9:55:20 AM PDT by 11th Commandment (Elect Conservatives- if you don't vote for McCain, at least work to elect conservatives!)
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To: 11th Commandment
$10~40k plus the value of your warranty

http://www.eaa-phev.org/wiki/Prius_PHEV#Kits_and_Conversions

89 posted on 03/20/2008 10:02:02 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney
Does that make sense economically?

I believe the electric car is a real product of the future. I think the series system is better than the parallel. However, Telsa motors has shown that the Lithium Ion technololgy is viable but still expensive. I don't think GM is going to come close to the $30K (ops, just announce $35k) for the Chevy Volt unless they sell at a loss. Toyota has announced it is sticking with the proven Nickel Cad.

90 posted on 03/20/2008 10:09:24 AM PDT by 11th Commandment (Elect Conservatives- if you don't vote for McCain, at least work to elect conservatives!)
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To: 11th Commandment
If they were after an economical decision ($/mile instead of gallons/mile), they wouldn't be buying a Prius in the first place.

http://209.157.64.200/focus/f-news/1974976/posts?page=76#76

91 posted on 03/20/2008 10:17:29 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney
Good Point- short fall in the example: First, Federal Tax Credit: Second, is that a Prius system is the equilevant of six cylinder power. So compare the auto cost and fuel ocst apples to apples and the tax credit, Prius is pretty competitve. And don't forget the cool toy factor....
92 posted on 03/20/2008 10:31:39 AM PDT by 11th Commandment (Elect Conservatives- if you don't vote for McCain, at least work to elect conservatives!)
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To: 11th Commandment

Federal Tax Credits for Prius have already been phased out.

http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/tax_hybrid.shtml


93 posted on 03/20/2008 10:50:38 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: 11th Commandment
How much does it cost to Convert a Prius to a plug in?

Last time I checked it a while ago it was about $6000, but it may have changed by now.

94 posted on 03/20/2008 12:19:43 PM PDT by Anticommie
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To: ontap
Yea! just us oldtimers who have actually plowed a row or two behind one of these gas passers.

"Gas passers?"

I prefer to think of my saddle mule as "jet-propelled."

95 posted on 03/20/2008 2:03:18 PM PDT by Texas Mulerider
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To: MileHi
What is a good stump broke mule fetching these days?

I'm told you can't find an owner willing to part with one.

A good saddle mule, however, will run you between $3,000 and $5,000, unless it's gaited, in which case add a couple grand.

No, I'm not kidding!

96 posted on 03/20/2008 2:13:10 PM PDT by Texas Mulerider
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To: Texas Mulerider

Fer a mule? I have thought that when I get moved out of town I might like one for getting around the mountains. But I don’t know much about horses or mules.

I s’pose you’re right about broke ones. {:0)


97 posted on 03/20/2008 2:38:36 PM PDT by MileHi ( "It's coming down to patriots vs the politicians." - ovrtaxt)
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To: Hacklehead

I have been closely monitoring the developments at Bell Bio-Energy, Inc. They have recently put up their web site. At last we have more detail about possibly the most important discovery in alternative energy ever.

I believe that it is of crucial importance information about their work be spread immediately everywhere. . If they are successful we will be able at one stroke to sever once and for all our dependence on foreign oil.

EVERYONE, please go to: http://www.bellbioenergy.com. For those who specialize in biochemistry and energy from Biomass, pay particular attention to their FAQ section. There you will find out specific details on how they intend to convert literally “Anything that grows” into oil.


98 posted on 06/20/2008 9:41:58 PM PDT by VLDdeSan (Reply to "most people who are called ‘crackpots’ really ARE crackpots")
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To: VLDdeSan

I reviewed the Faq as well as the “roadmap”. According to the original article, they (you?) expect to be in full production within a year or 2. From the web site it looks like the research has barely begun. From my several decades experience in microbiology and molecular biology, I estimate that it will take a team of 20 at least 10 years to accomplish a fraction of the goals.
The roadmap also states that a genomic library will be screened for enzyme activity. Apparently the researchers at Auburn don’t know the difference between DNA and enzymes.


99 posted on 06/21/2008 7:14:01 AM PDT by Hacklehead (Crush the liberals, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentation of the hippies.)
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To: Neville72

J.C. Bell Interviewed on Iowa’s WHO Radio yesterday afternoon - podcast:
http://www.whoradio.com/cc-common/podcast/single_page.html?podcast=simonconway&selected_podcast=WHO-05-12-1700.mp3


100 posted on 05/13/2011 10:37:39 AM PDT by Keith in Iowa (FR Class of 1998 | TV News is an oxymoron. | MSNBC = Moonbats Spouting Nothing But Crap.)
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