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Ugly black buzzards finding Texas buffet in young stock
chron.com ^ | 04/12/2008 | MICHAEL GRACZYK

Posted on 04/13/2008 9:15:17 AM PDT by devane617

COLLEGE STATION — Maybe if they were pretty, the ubiquitous buzzards that soar over Texas and elsewhere before landing to dine on some carcass wouldn't be viewed with such repugnance or considered a nuisance.

"Unquestionably, they're as ugly as sin," says Ian Tizard, a Texas A&M University professor of immunology and director of the school's Schubot Exotic Bird Center.

The birds range over much of the United States, and their March return to Hinckley, Ohio, for instance, is welcomed annually as a sure sign of spring.

But their proliferation as pests is making them unwelcome from high-rises in Florida to ranches in Texas, denying the misnamed buzzards — they're really vultures, and either turkey or black vultures — the respect as Mother Nature's vacuum cleaners that they might deserve.

Think roadkill.

"They're using up a useful food supply that would otherwise go to waste," said Tizard, who's studied birds for more than 40 years. "And you can make a case they tidy up the countryside too. We'd have a lot more smelly dead bodies around the place if they weren't there to clean it up."

Ranchers all around Texas increasingly are telling wildlife authorities that black vultures in particular, considered the more aggressive version of the bird and can reach 25 inches in length and have a wingspan of 5 feet, are responsible for killing young cows, sheep and goats.

"They're prospering," Tizard said. "Clearly if they're killing cows that otherwise would live, that indeed is a cause for some significant concern.

In Madisonville, about 100 miles north of Houston, city commissioners gave their blessing in January to shoot vultures blamed for destroying property as long as folks obtained the proper federal permits. Vultures, like virtually all birds, are federally protected.

Just last month, officials in Barstow, Fla., moved to include them in their Noxious Birds Ordinance of 2008, removing them from protection on a bird sanctuary island.

Randy Smith, a San Antonio-based biologist with the Texas Wildlife Services Program, said complaints about buzzards have soared.

"Ten years ago, it was a rarity, but it's pretty frequent nowadays," he said. "Usually we'll end up assisting the rancher. Nine times out of 10, we'll assist him getting a permit."

The permit allows the birds to be trapped or killed in addition to allow use of harassment to try to drive them away.

Harassment is what officials at the Halifax Health Medical Center outside Daytona Beach, Fla., have been using since early this year, apparently with some success. Metal spikes, sprinklers and a loud roof alarm are meant to discourage vultures from roosting.

It might not work forever.

"They're very smart," Smith said. "These vultures learn over time what you're doing doesn't hurt them."

That's when game officials recommend a shotgun might be more convincing.

In urban settings, the pesky birds are known to roost in high-rise buildings and peck at rubber seals around windows.

The turkey vulture's bald red head is the source of its name. Its cousin, the black vulture, has a gray head. They also differ in how they fly and hunt. The turkey vulture relies on the sense of smell, the black vulture sight, and frequently watches its turkey brethren find the food, then pushes its way into the roadside buffet.

Their featherless bald heads, though, are a remarkable evolutionary trait.

"You have a bare neck because you don't want your neck all matted with blood if you're sticking your head into a carcass," Tizard said. "The bare skins are an adaptation, but it sure makes for an ugly bird."

Poking around inside a dead animal for lunch also means they have a strong immune system. And add to that no real predators and an abundance of food, it's no wonder the population of one of the nation's more common birds has taken off.

Tizard said when he came to Texas A&M a quarter century ago, turkey vultures would have accounted for about 90 percent of the buzzard population, but the more aggressive black vultures have been moving steadily north and probably now make up about 70 percent.

He suggests it's because of the availability of more food.

"Imagine what Texas was like before cars," Tizard said. "There would have been dead critters around the place but never so obvious like the possums and skunks along the side of the road and roadkill deer. I strongly suspect there's a lot more food for them, and it's moving north too.

"And, on the whole, people don't bother them."

Both species are related to storks rather than buzzards, which are found in Africa. Buzzard is the old English name for hawks, which resemble vultures in flight.

"I think the early settlers saw a big black bird floating around in the sky and called them buzzards," he said.

But it's in the pasture where the serious damage happens.

Vultures "hang around when calves are being born on the pasture because there's a good meal there."

"My impression is that if the calf is weak, say it can't rise, and if mama is weak and she can't protect it, then they might not wait until it's dead," he said. "I've talked to a lot of ranchers and I do believe under some circumstances, black vultures are very aggressive and they're not going to wait until that animal is totally dead."

As far as the vultures being a threat to humans, he doesn't believe it's a problem.

"They're going to run away from people," he said. "My impression is they're going to get close to an animal that can't respond. A dying animal, they're waiting. As they say, the vultures are closing in. And that's exactly what happens."


TOPICS: News/Current Events; US: Texas
KEYWORDS: texas; tx; vultures
Watch the kids, and kitties...
1 posted on 04/13/2008 9:15:17 AM PDT by devane617
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To: devane617

Send them to the border.


2 posted on 04/13/2008 9:18:06 AM PDT by BenLurkin
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To: devane617

The vultures are drawn to the cities by newspapers.


3 posted on 04/13/2008 9:18:13 AM PDT by MrEdd (Heck? Geewhiz Cripes, thats the place where people who don't believe in Gosh think they aint going.)
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To: devane617

I can see why a health center would not want buzzards roosting on it.


4 posted on 04/13/2008 9:20:50 AM PDT by Shanda
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To: devane617
"Unquestionably, they're as ugly as sin," says Ian Tizard, a Texas A&M University professor of immunology and director of the school's Schubot Exotic Bird Center.

Well, of course they are. Most scavenging animals are disgusting. The Lord designed them that way on purpose.
5 posted on 04/13/2008 9:21:32 AM PDT by arderkrag (Libertarian Nutcase (Political Compass Coordinates: 9.00, -2.62 - www.politicalcompass.org))
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To: Shanda

Yeh, they should roost on nursing homes instead.


6 posted on 04/13/2008 9:21:58 AM PDT by arderkrag (Libertarian Nutcase (Political Compass Coordinates: 9.00, -2.62 - www.politicalcompass.org))
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To: devane617

“Typical” black buzzards...


7 posted on 04/13/2008 9:23:46 AM PDT by KoRn (CTHULHU '08 - I won't settle for a lesser evil any longer!)
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To: devane617
These birds just have bad PR. Do what California does and call them "Condors".

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

8 posted on 04/13/2008 9:24:51 AM PDT by John Jorsett (scam never sleeps)
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To: MrEdd

Do they carry democrat party membership cards?


9 posted on 04/13/2008 9:24:53 AM PDT by 353FMG (Vote for the Candidate who will do the least damage to our country.)
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To: 353FMG
Do they carry democrat party membership cards?

Yes, as well as their "Trial Lawyers Association" card.
10 posted on 04/13/2008 9:30:26 AM PDT by wolfpat (If you don't like the Patriot Act, you're really gonna hate Sharia Law.)
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To: devane617

The old gag line on the cartoon with two buzzards sitting in a dead tree, “Patience Hell!!! Let’s kill something”, may be true.:D


11 posted on 04/13/2008 9:31:04 AM PDT by burroak
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To: devane617

True story from Arlington, TX.

I got a contract working for a company that, to be frank, was in its death throes. They seemed to think having me come in and add a financial aspect to their marketing presentations would overcome the fact their service really didn’t make financial sense for their prospective customers.

Shortly after I started, when they started getting sued by so many vendors I couldn’t even keep all the suits straight, a bunch of vultures started to hang out on a balcony attached to their offices.

It wasn’t long after that that I started requiring payment weekly for the next week, and cashed the check at lunch just to be sure it cleared.


12 posted on 04/13/2008 9:33:27 AM PDT by SlapHappyPappy
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To: devane617
And add to that no real predators ...

Understandable, when one considers that their defense strategy includes barfing on their attackers...

13 posted on 04/13/2008 9:33:46 AM PDT by LRS ( MommaObama = Barack; MommaObamaMomma = Mrs Obama; MommaObamaMa=his ma;MommaObamaMama=grandma)
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To: SlapHappyPappy

I used to work at the Savannah River Nuclear facility. I loved seeing the Black Vultures and the Turkey Vultures perched all over the nuclear cooling towers.


14 posted on 04/13/2008 9:39:21 AM PDT by gitmo (From now on, ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put.)
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To: devane617
Not only is this a good article ("Buzzard" means hawk/one hunts by eyesight and the other by smell/"Condors = protected vs. vulture = pest/etc.), it's also timeless.

"Ranchers all around Texas increasingly are telling wildlife authorities that black vultures in particular...are responsible for killing young cows, sheep and goats."

Could have come from any local paper south of Austin - oh, about sixty years ago.

PS: I'm pretty sure that both 'south of Austin' and 'sixty years' understate historic fact (just as 'killing sheep' overstates it) but I can only speak to experience.

15 posted on 04/13/2008 9:54:47 AM PDT by norton
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To: devane617

Great timing for this story, about a week ago there were 5 of them on my burn pile in my back field where I threw a dead coyote a couple of months past.

My kids were fascinated watching them jump around the pile tearing at the carcass, and I could tell my son was just itching to mess with them somehow.

I told him to go get his Red Ryder BB gun (he’s nine) and I would pay him $10 if he brought me one he shot. His eyes lit up and I never saw him run so fast to get his shoes on, or look so disappointed when they scattered before he could get close enough to even see them clearly.


16 posted on 04/13/2008 9:56:30 AM PDT by Abathar (Proudly posting without reading the article carefully since 2004)
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To: devane617

Good article.I’ve never seen a buzzard/vulture go after a live animal,but i would not be surprised if it’s true-especially a small animal(ex cat,small dog).They are very large-with formidable claws.Every winter(in my area-urban-a couple miles outside downtown Tampa)almost overnight my area goes from a handfull of buzzards-to hundreds.Statewide-i assume thousands.Just like their(northern)human counter parts-it must be the warm weather:)Anyways-i’ve always wondered what they(vultures-not humans)eat to survive while on “vacation” from wherever?Only so much road kill out there.


17 posted on 04/13/2008 9:57:00 AM PDT by Thombo2
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To: devane617

“I strongly suspect there’s a lot more food for them, and it’s moving north too.”

A few illegals consumed by buzzards down here.


18 posted on 04/13/2008 10:02:32 AM PDT by SwinneySwitch (US Constitution Article 4 Section 4..shall protect each of them against Invasion...domestic Violence)
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To: devane617
Vultures, like virtually all birds, are federally protected.

I've googled and can't seem to find anything that says vultures are federally protected. They aren't in Texas. If someone finds it, let me know. As long as they go after roadkill I don't have a problem. However, any rancher who's livestock is being picked off should shoot, shovel, and shut up. There's a prick here who shoots coyotes and hangs them at his front gate in view of everyone driving down the road. Personally, I suspect he's trying to compensate for his short comings. http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/species/endang/animals/birds/#raptors

19 posted on 04/13/2008 10:07:38 AM PDT by mtbopfuyn (The fence is "absolutely not the answer" - Gov. Rick Perry (R, TX))
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To: gitmo
I loved seeing the Black Vultures and the Turkey Vultures perched all over the nuclear cooling towers.

One day there were 5 turkey buzzards perched on the church sign. If I'd only had my camera.

20 posted on 04/13/2008 10:10:57 AM PDT by mtbopfuyn (The fence is "absolutely not the answer" - Gov. Rick Perry (R, TX))
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To: burroak; All

My bird book says that vultures and birds of prey (Eagles, Hawks, etc) are members of the same family. I guess that means that the eagles and such are the ones without any patience!


21 posted on 04/13/2008 10:20:34 AM PDT by ROLF of the HILL COUNTRY ( Terrorism is a symptom, ISLAM IS THE DISEASE!)
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To: devane617
hmmm - the claim that the buzzards actually do the killing is suspect. It's not their nature. They may attack an animal, person that is already down and dying to a point of not being able to provide any struggle, but I'd like to see some actual proof of them attacking a healthy animal.

Sounds more like an excuse to kill them. They are nature's clean-up crew. They have their place in the scheme of things

22 posted on 04/13/2008 10:27:36 AM PDT by maine-iac7 (Just a Typical White, gun-toting, Jesus-loving Gramma)
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To: maine-iac7

I don’t think vultures can digest fresh meat.

They have very little in the way of stomach/intestines to process fresh meat.

They have to wait until it is decomposing. Then they can digest it.

That’s why this article is way off.


23 posted on 04/13/2008 10:36:14 AM PDT by squarebarb
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To: devane617
While I was reading the description of these vultures for some strange reason the picture of the closely cropped head of Hussein Oboma popped into my mind. It was not pleasant
24 posted on 04/13/2008 10:37:04 AM PDT by fella (Is he al-taquiya or is he murtadd? Only his iman knows for sure.)
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To: devane617

They’re awesome animals. The first time I saw them with a roadkill deer I was like a kid on his first visit to the zoo.


25 posted on 04/13/2008 10:49:55 AM PDT by denydenydeny (Expel the priest and you don't inaugurate the age of reason, you get the witch doctor--Paul Johnson)
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To: mtbopfuyn; devane617

We have mostly black vultures here, and I’m rather glad we have them to clean up the dead stuff. They use the updrafts that develop over the water and the cliff our road is on to float around and look for food-I have also seen them pounce on lizards and small snakes on the deck, carry them up onto the upstairs balcony and eat them.

I’ve never seen them catch a live mammal, but if my dog or one of my cats is sitting by the door the balcony, they will walk right up and peck at it or spread their wings, which makes the cats fall over themselves to get under the bed while the dog jumps at the door barking. They also perch on the peak of the roof and peck and claw the caulking from around the vent pipes and chimney flashings so that has to be redone every year. Other than that, they are not a bother.


26 posted on 04/13/2008 11:08:55 AM PDT by Texan5 (You've got to saddle up your boys, you've got to draw a hard line...)
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To: wolfpat
“Do they carry democrat party membership cards?

Yes, as well as their “Trial Lawyers Association” card.”

In Miami, the crapital city of the Sheeples republic of FloriDUH, vultures roost on the court house roof.

The accepted consensus of legal opinion is that they are NOT reincarnated trial lawyers. They are reincarnated divorce lawyers.

27 posted on 04/13/2008 11:10:19 AM PDT by GladesGuru (In a society predicated upon freedom, it is essential to examine principle)
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To: maine-iac7

In NJ the black vultures are relatively new - I first saw them about five years ago. They attack newborn calves, lambs, kids. I wonder if they get fawns but the fawns are darn nigh invisible. I’ve been within six feet of one before seeing it.

USDA report on the vultures here.
http://www.aphis.usda.gov/ws/statereports/NJ/vulturenj.pdf

Sounds like the biggest problem is roosting - some people in the next town had about 50 on their roof every evening - can you imagine the damage from the guano and the reek of it?

A few, not many, have picked my pine trees, to judge from the white streaks on the rhodondrons. I try to discourage them when I see them sweeping in low - they’ll make twenty circles before landing. I’m a lousy rock thrower, so will invest in a beebee gun or slingshot if the numbers increase.


28 posted on 04/13/2008 11:17:10 AM PDT by heartwood
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To: squarebarb

The Raptor Trust was feeding their vultures dead rats the same as they were feeding owls, hawks, eagles when I visited.


29 posted on 04/13/2008 11:21:44 AM PDT by heartwood
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To: Abathar
I told him to go get his Red Ryder BB gun

oh my. Memories.

Last year, for my big brother's 74th birthday, I gave him his Red Ryder BB gun that he had carved his initials in when a boy - (My aunt had it stored away in a closet and I got it at her passing) - and that gun STILL has all it's power!

We grew up on a farm in northern Maine - and instead of snowmen, I would make snow-horses with a little snow "Little Beaver" sitting on the back - and away I would "ride"

30 posted on 04/13/2008 11:43:14 AM PDT by maine-iac7 (Just a Typical White, gun-toting, Jesus-loving Gramma)
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To: heartwood
can you imagine the damage from the guano and the reek of it?

Hey! Where's your entrepreneurial spirit!

The Spanish made a fortune shipping guano from Central America back to Spain!

31 posted on 04/13/2008 11:47:40 AM PDT by maine-iac7 (Just a Typical White, gun-toting, Jesus-loving Gramma)
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To: maine-iac7

I grew up in the country without a lot of kids around, so I had my trusty BB gun and literally square miles of places to find something to shoot at. I would rig up my gun with a rope sling (tied to tape around the barrel so I could still see the front sight), stuff about half of the big 5000 size box of BB’s in my pouch with some snacks and water and would not be seen again until dark.

I was Soooo disappointed when I bought my son his first Red Ryder, the cocking handle is now cheap plastic that bends when you use it, and it just feels like a piece of crap compared to what you and I had when we were young.

Might have the same spring and power, but they cheapened it up so bad I was almost tempted to not give it to him and search for a used original one somewhere.

I swear I got so good at sighting that thing after about 30K BB’s I could hit d*mn near anything I aimed for. When I got a real gun I kept missing clays and game because I didn’t have to lead everything moving by 2-1/2’....


32 posted on 04/13/2008 12:19:23 PM PDT by Abathar (Proudly posting without reading the article carefully since 2004)
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To: maine-iac7
"...They have their place in the scheme of things..."

That's what I've come to realize. This Floridian has never seen so many turkey buzzards as are soaring over the Florida Keys. On occasion, a whale carcass has washed up on State Parks, so they're good to have around.

My theory (as a birdwatcher living in Florida since 1958) is that until the Interstate—with its increased speeds—there were very fewer buzzards than today.

33 posted on 04/13/2008 4:17:46 PM PDT by Does so (...against all enemies, DOMESTIC and foreign...)
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To: devane617

I did an article search for Texas, because I was posting on the latest developments after the raid, and when I saw that headline, I thought it was another article about the polygamy cult.


34 posted on 04/14/2008 8:34:53 PM PDT by BlackVeil
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