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NSU professor loses job in dispute over grades
PilotOnline.com ^ | May 4, 2008 | Bill Sizemore

Posted on 05/05/2008 6:18:42 PM PDT by brwnsuga

NORFOLK

At the end of this semester, Steven Aird will lose his job as an associate professor of biology at Norfolk State University for giving out too many F's.

He is not going quietly.

Aird says his termination is part of a dumbing-down of academic standards at NSU - a move by administrators to intimidate faculty members into passing undeserving students and rewarding inferior work.

Other faculty members in NSU's School of Science and Technology say they, too, have experienced pressure to bend their standards to pass more students, and more than a dozen current and former students in the school back up Aird's claim.

Because it is a personnel issue, NSU administrators declined to comment directly about Aird's case. But Sharon Hoggard, a university spokeswoman, flatly rejected Aird's accusation that the school has dumbed down its standards.

"It goes against our very mission, which is to provide an affordable high-quality education for an ethnically and culturally diverse student population," Hoggard said in an e-mail response. She pointed out that NSU is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, for which it must meet stringent standards.

Aird says he understands, and believes in, NSU's mission. But he insists that too many of the university's students are ill-prepared for college-level work. "I really care about my students," he said. "That's why I refuse to lower the bar. The objective should be competence, not grades."

For more than four years, Aird has carried on a running battle in which NSU administrators repeatedly pressed him to raise his pass rate and he steadfastly refused.

Twice, he was denied tenure and issued a one-year terminal contract, meaning he would have to leave at the end of the year. After the first denial, he filed a grievance. A faculty grievance committee found in his favor, ruling that the tenure decision was flawed by procedural violations and retaliatory actions by administrators.

He reapplied and was turned down again, despite a favorable recommendation by a departmental tenure review committee. Citing seven classes in which 83 to 95 percent of his students got a D or F, Sandra DeLoatch, dean of the School of Science and Technology, wrote that Aird's "core problem" was "the overwhelming failure of the vast majority of the students he teaches."

His bosses say it's the teacher's responsibility to make sure the lessons are getting through. Carol Simpson, provost at Old Dominion University, agreed that a professor's high failure rate would be an appropriate matter for some type of intervention.

"It would send a flag that something is amiss," she said. "What that something is - it could be all kinds of things, depending on the class and the students and the professor. But it does say that all is not well. You would expect a reasonable bell-shaped curve where the top part of the bell is maybe a middle C. You wouldn't expect to have huge numbers failing."

The problem could be the difficulty of the material, the students' level of preparation or the way the material is being presented, Simpson said.

"Not every professor is an expert in the classroom," she said, "although they may be terrific researchers or scholars."

Hoggard, the NSU spokeswoman, said the university uses a multifaceted assessment of teaching effectiveness based on faculty portfolios, student ratings, peer evaluations and comments from the department chair and dean.

This semester, his last, Aird has been removed from the classroom. He spends his time doing research and job-hunting. At 55, he faces the possible end of his academic career.

Aird grew up in the Maryland suburbs of Washington and earned a doctorate in zoology from Colorado State University. A published researcher, he specializes in the chemistry of poisonous snake venoms.

After four years as a university teacher and researcher in Brazil, he came to NSU in 2002 and was assigned to the chemistry department. His first semester, 22 of the 24 students in his biochemistry course got Ds, Fs or dropped the class. In a November 2003 memo, Associate Dean Larry Mattix warned him: "This low level of student success is unacceptable."

In 2004, Aird was reassigned to the biology department.

The issue surfaced again quickly. In a December 2004 memo, Camellia Okpodu, the biology department chair, expressed alarm about the grades in lab sections of the freshman-level biology course. Dean DeLoatch, in rejecting Aird's application for tenure in March 2007, reiterated the theme again.

Each time, Aird's response was unbending. "I believe that we serve our students and our country best when we help our students to discover and develop their abilities, and when we help them develop the intellectual tools and the strength of character to overcome the obstacles they will encounter in life," he wrote in reply to Okpodu. "That cannot be accomplished, as so many at NSU have tried, by pandering to them and to their parents with inflated grades and pass rates."

To support his allegations of grade inflation, Aird performed a statistical analysis of two common exams that were given to all students taking the freshman-level biology course in the fall of 2005. The median grade in all sections on both exams - taught by five different professors - was F.

His final grades were an accurate reflection of students' performance on those two exams, Aird wrote the dean.

Hoggard said attributing the discrepancy between exam results and final grades to grade inflation is too simplistic.

"Every student doesn't learn in the same way," she said. "It becomes the duty of the faculty member to find ways to ensure that his or her students are understanding the material."

Student testimonials to Aird cite his passion for biology, his enthusiasm in the classroom and his willingness to help students who are struggling.

Natalie James, a senior biology major, took Aird's zoology class in 2006. "He told us at the beginning of the semester, 'It's going to hurt, and I'm going to really push you.'

"I was up at 2 o'clock many mornings e-mailing him with questions. It was a challenge the whole time."

James said Aird had a pleasant attitude and she learned more than she could have imagined in one semester. At the end of the course, she said, "I came out with an A by the skin of my teeth."

In contrast, James said, she easily received an A in another class. "Yes, it looks nice when you get out with a 4.0 GPA, but then you go to medical school and you know nothing."

Tiana Stephenson, a junior journalism major, took Aird's freshman biology class in 2005 and found it difficult, despite Aird's out-of-class assistance.

"I got a D - the only one I've ever gotten," she said. "If I had it to do over again, I wouldn't have taken his course. I was still in a high-school mindset, and he's not a high-school teacher."

Some of Aird's colleagues agree that professors feel pressure to pass more students.

At the School of Science and Technology, said Joseph Hall, a chemistry professor and president of the Faculty Senate, "faculty are - I'll use a nice word - encouraged to try and pass 70 percent of their students." If the rate drops below 70 percent, he said, "faculty are called in and asked to explain what they're going to do about it."

Aird thinks the phenomenon is due in part to the evolution of a "consumer culture" in higher education. He argues that administrators are tempted to placate students and parents with good grades to keep the tuition dollars flowing.

The financial pressure is particularly acute at NSU. Alone among Virginia state schools, most of which are experiencing significant growth, NSU's enrollment has declined by more than one-third over the past 15 years.

Hall echoed Aird's view that many NSU students come poorly prepared for college work.

Because so many have deficient study habits and poor writing skills, he said, "if you adhere to a certain standard, you would flunk a significant number of them, and you have to do something to try to get them to catch up." For instance, Hall said, he gives optional bonus quizzes to help students pull up their grades.

Hall said he counseled Aird to be more flexible, to no avail.

"I think what Steve decided was that the university should put programs in place to build up the background of the students, or admit better students. And he stuck to those guns."

Cassandra Newby-Alexander, an NSU history professor and vice president of the Faculty Senate, chaired the faculty committee that upheld Aird's grievance. She said there's always room for improving one's teaching technique, but she felt Aird deserved a chance to be mentored. "He didn't get the fair shake he should have had an opportunity to get."


TOPICS: Government; News/Current Events; US: Virginia
KEYWORDS: academia; dumbingdown; education; professors; university
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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1 posted on 05/05/2008 6:18:43 PM PDT by brwnsuga
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To: brwnsuga

If one student got an “A”....as cited here...then I think we’ve got a problem....I really don’t want any of the D and F students to be MY DOCTOR.


2 posted on 05/05/2008 6:22:40 PM PDT by goodnesswins (20 is the new 10)
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To: brwnsuga

“high-quality education for an ethnically and culturally diverse student population,”

Sigh. Quotas in grades based upon race and/or ethnicity.

My take, anyhow.


3 posted on 05/05/2008 6:24:10 PM PDT by dynachrome (Immigration without assimilation means the death of this nation~Captainpaintball)
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To: brwnsuga

Just damn....


4 posted on 05/05/2008 6:24:43 PM PDT by clee1 (We use 43 muscles to frown, 17 to smile, and 2 to pull a trigger. I'm lazy and I'm tired of smiling.)
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To: brwnsuga

I’m all for a professor who isn’t afraid to flunk a lousy student, but this is ridiculous: “Citing seven classes in which 83 to 95 percent of his students got a D or F...”

He’s not teaching at MIT.


5 posted on 05/05/2008 6:25:16 PM PDT by dangus
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To: brwnsuga
Gotta keep those tuition checks rolling in.
6 posted on 05/05/2008 6:25:38 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Islam is a religion of peace, and Muslims reserve the right to kill anyone who says otherwise.)
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To: brwnsuga; All

Posted just before this:

“Success Is Built On Work Ethic, Not Grievances (SOWELL)”

Dr. Sowell gets it.


7 posted on 05/05/2008 6:26:13 PM PDT by dynachrome (Immigration without assimilation means the death of this nation~Captainpaintball)
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To: brwnsuga
And what did they say to or do about the flunking students?

Actually go look at the school work that failed? I doubt it. It's all the teachers fault.

That colleges actually offer remedial math and English AND accept students who need those classes still astounds me.

8 posted on 05/05/2008 6:26:37 PM PDT by Lizavetta
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To: brwnsuga
What happens in a world where everyone is told they are experts in everything (i.e. they are passed when they actually failed) when in fact, no one in the world is an expert in anything? I don't think I want to live in that world.

- JoMa

9 posted on 05/05/2008 6:27:43 PM PDT by joma89
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To: dangus

>> For instance, Hall said, he gives optional bonus quizzes to help students pull up their grades. <<

Flunking 9 out of 10 students isn’t the answer. Bonus quizzes aren’t. Remedial instruction, maybe? Nah, that might COST something.


10 posted on 05/05/2008 6:27:59 PM PDT by dangus
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To: brwnsuga

I feel for the guy, having gone through the same thing when I taught in an inner city public school in Dallas several years ago. The first 6 weeks I first taught ended and I had to prepare my grades—not a single one of my 30 or so students passed! (Bear in mind that many of them were illegal immigrants.)

I went to my mentor who totally freaked out—turns out I was required by DISTRICT POLICY to pass EVERY single student. I was totally shocked!! I was to substitute their real grade if they weren’t passing with a 70, which was passing. This was even for students who came into my classroom (4th graders) with no school supplies (although many had Air Jordan sneakers and lovely Raiders coats) and would stick their feet up on the desk and not do a darn thing the whole day (except for get in trouble) and never turned in a single piece of work—to this day it still galls me that those children were cheated like that. It just reinforced their ‘entitlements’ mindset. :-(


11 posted on 05/05/2008 6:28:13 PM PDT by pillut48 (CJ in TX --Soccer Mom and proud Rush Conservative with no dog in the presidential race now *sigh*)
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To: brwnsuga

There is something wrong when the majority of students flunk a course. Either the professor stinks, or more stringent prerequisites should be applied so that only students who are likely to pass enroll in the first place, or the material of the course needs to be split up into two or more courses. Or some combination of the above


12 posted on 05/05/2008 6:30:07 PM PDT by PapaBear3625 ("In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act." — George Orwell)
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To: brwnsuga
Five students have left their opinions at ratemyprofessors.com:


13 posted on 05/05/2008 6:37:01 PM PDT by FoxInSocks (B. Hussein Obama: The Paucity of Hope)
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To: PapaBear3625

Or the students got this far without learning very much.

A likely scenario, imo.

Goes back to “teaching the test” so your graduation rates look good, and to hell with actually learning the subjects.

When these students get to higher level schools, they are screwed. They haven’t got a clue.

Wait until they get into the work force...


14 posted on 05/05/2008 6:37:09 PM PDT by ltc8k6
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To: FoxInSocks

I just read your post about the opinions on ratemyprofessors.com. Is it just me or do these students need grammar lessons too?


15 posted on 05/05/2008 6:41:05 PM PDT by brwnsuga (Proud, Black, Sexy Conservative!!!)
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To: PapaBear3625

“”..To support his allegations of grade inflation, Aird performed a statistical analysis of two common exams that were given to all students taking the freshman-level biology course in the fall of 2005. The median grade in all sections on both exams - taught by five different professors - was F...””

If true this part here seems to support the inflated grade part.


16 posted on 05/05/2008 6:44:48 PM PDT by Edison (I don't know what irks me more, the lying or the incompetence.)
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To: PapaBear3625
There is something wrong when the majority of students flunk a course.

I took a notoriously difficult first-semester chemistry course in the UVA engineering school. The highest scores on tests were routinely in the 30 to 40 percent range.

The professor used some sort of curve system, though, so everyone didn't necessarily fail. I did learn a lot, despite the low test scores. I guess a lot of the problems were simply very hard to solve -- correctly, that is.

17 posted on 05/05/2008 6:45:21 PM PDT by FoxInSocks (B. Hussein Obama: The Paucity of Hope)
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To: brwnsuga

Go read more reviews at the Web site. Words will fail you.


18 posted on 05/05/2008 6:45:28 PM PDT by Lord Basil
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To: goodnesswins

My mother is a college comp sci professor. This is spot on. Schools are graduating students who I wouldn’t let clean my pool, let alone write code.


19 posted on 05/05/2008 6:46:20 PM PDT by steel_resolve (Operation Chaos is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.)
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To: brwnsuga

20 posted on 05/05/2008 6:46:35 PM PDT by MarineBrat (My wife and I took an AIDS vaccination that the Church offers.)
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To: Lizavetta
Image hosted by Photobucket.com the first day of college english i was exposed to a basketball bozo who told the class (during the required stand up and introduce yourself)and i quote... "I lites bassetball, girls, i be lawyer."

a fight nearly broke out when i told him "you NEED lawyer before you ever be one... i had to take a test to get into this class, how the hell did you ever get in here???"

needless to say he never came back to class but... i did see his worthless azz couple days later in the commons with an english 100 textbook.

See dopey. See dopey run with a bassetball!!! 8^)

21 posted on 05/05/2008 6:46:45 PM PDT by Chode (American Hedonist ©®)
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To: brwnsuga

Links to the course materials:

http://sst.nsu.edu/coursematerials.php

Click on the name of a course to see course requirements.

At the top of each course page are links to Chapters, Syllabus, Objectives, Labs, Practice Area, Lecture Notes, Sample Tests.

For some courses, the links are to extensive material on the textbook’s Web site. Other courses link to the prof’s own materials.

I’m guessing that the students have poor reading comprehension, did not take challenging science courses in high school, and sailed through K-12.


22 posted on 05/05/2008 6:48:18 PM PDT by LibFreeOrDie
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Comment #23 Removed by Moderator

To: brwnsuga
In contrast, James said, she easily received an A in another class. "Yes, it looks nice when you get out with a 4.0 GPA, but then you go to medical school and you know nothing."

someone gets it.
24 posted on 05/05/2008 7:02:31 PM PDT by stylin19a
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To: brwnsuga
Every student doesn't learn in the same way

I was willing to consider the possibility that the guy is just too tough on them but the above statement from the university is telling. When they pull this one out, it is ALWAYS a dodge. A cheap and disingenuous way to say, "Shut up and trust us. We're experts."

25 posted on 05/05/2008 7:05:03 PM PDT by irv
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Comment #26 Removed by Moderator

To: ltc8k6

Wait until they get into the work force...”

a government job awaits, rest assured.


27 posted on 05/05/2008 7:11:43 PM PDT by tired1 (responsibility without authority is slavery!)
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To: dynachrome

What’s really sad now is that I hesitate going to a “minority” doctor.....


28 posted on 05/05/2008 7:13:49 PM PDT by goodnesswins (20 is the new 10)
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To: brwnsuga

Is it just me?””

who cares, and what’s your problem?


29 posted on 05/05/2008 7:14:08 PM PDT by tired1 (responsibility without authority is slavery!)
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To: tired1

As a former teacher, I also found the lack of correct grammar/grammatical skills appalling. :-( Unfortunately, ebonics passes for passing nowadays!!


30 posted on 05/05/2008 7:21:17 PM PDT by pillut48 (CJ in TX --Soccer Mom and proud Rush Conservative with no dog in the presidential race now *sigh*)
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To: pillut48

relax, you’re in bad company. to quote our Pres: “Chilrn does lern”.


31 posted on 05/05/2008 7:24:10 PM PDT by tired1 (responsibility without authority is slavery!)
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Comment #32 Removed by Moderator

To: PapaBear3625

Your suggestion that there be either a course with more stringent prerequisites or that the course be split into two or more courses has a lot of merit.

When I entered Temple Un. in Sept. 1962, I had just come out of a good high school biology class with an A. Upon signing up for basic Biology to meet my science requirements, we were told (about 300 of us) that “Look your left and look to your right, because most of them won’t be back next semester”. We weren’t.

I learned from one of my lab partners (who was about 6 years older than me and a pre-med student) that this Biology 101 was a Med School wash-out class. If they had told us that earlier, I wouldn’t have wasted the time and money that I did.

A non-pre-Med school biology course could have been devised for those of us who were just mere mortals.

As for math, which I only passed in high school because my math teacher was a saint who had mercy on me, Temple had a “Finite Math” course and the regular Trig/Calculus courses (which I had either flunked or barely passed in high school - advanced courses). I passed Finite Math with very good grades and my soul intact.

I still use the principles of “Finite Sets” for my work and was using them to explain a political principle tonight to a colleague who is a national columnist/media analyst. And it made sense, too.

However, my high school advanced courses allowed me to cruise thru history (same book), and other courses before I got to the challenging ones.

Kids today are basically illiterate, both verbally and in writing, cannot form concise statement of fact to explain something, nor can they enunciate principles in a clear and articulate manner.

Hey, dude, duh, you know, like, you have to understand what I mean, etc. just doesn’t cut it in the real world.


33 posted on 05/05/2008 7:47:18 PM PDT by MadMax, the Grinning Reaper
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To: dynachrome
Dr. Sowell gets it.

I wonder what grade he would have gotten in the class.

34 posted on 05/05/2008 7:50:24 PM PDT by Last Dakotan
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To: PapaBear3625
Many years ago, when I took Organic Chem, my class had 15 students. The results: one A, one B, three C's, one D and 9 F's. This was common at the time (late 60s). (I earned the B).
I am now an Adjunct Math Prof (retired) and just finished the grades for my Intro to Alg for this Spring Semester. The results: one A, 13 B's, 13 C's, one D and 20 F's. Eighteen of the F's were really FA (failure to attend); the students just stopped coming to class for whatever reason.
BTW my student evals are among the highest in the dept.
35 posted on 05/05/2008 7:53:13 PM PDT by quantar
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To: brwnsuga
Dude, I wish I were in school now. With my motivation, advanced techiniques of slacking off, and drinking habits, I'd earn a Ph.D in no time! "Doctor Revolting cat! will be your surgeon today."
36 posted on 05/05/2008 7:58:15 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (You're gonna cry 96 Tears on my Pillow!)
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To: MadMax, the Grinning Reaper
Hey, dude, duh, you know, like, you have to understand what I mean, etc. just doesn’t cut it in the real world.

Unless you are B. Hussein Ubama, LOL! :-)
37 posted on 05/05/2008 7:59:56 PM PDT by pillut48 (CJ in TX --Soccer Mom and proud Rush Conservative with no dog in the presidential race now *sigh*)
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To: goodnesswins
"I really don’t want any of the D and F students to be MY DOCTOR"

And oh boy am I glad that I don't have a doctor!

38 posted on 05/05/2008 8:00:38 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Jimmy Carter is the skidmark in the panties of American History)
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To: brwnsuga; FoxInSocks
I just read your post about the opinions on ratemyprofessors.com. Is it just me or do these students need grammar lessons too?

Yogi Bear:

"Hey, hey! F*ck literacy, Boo-Boo!"

39 posted on 05/05/2008 8:04:36 PM PDT by an amused spectator (Spitzer would have used the Mann Act against an enemy in a New York minute.)
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To: brwnsuga

I am not going to look up Norfolk State (but probably should) however I can probably make an guess as to the adminstration’s motivation.

Norfolk State is probably not in the top 20 of the U.S. News & World Report rankings. One of the killers for lower tier schools is “retention.” That is code for the percentage of first-time, full-time freshman that graduate in six years. My guess is that NSU isn’t close to the 80% or so of top tier schools. You can’t retain students who flunk out.


40 posted on 05/05/2008 8:06:35 PM PDT by PrincessB ("I am an expert on my own opinion." - Dave Ramsey)
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To: Lizavetta
"That colleges actually offer remedial math and English AND accept students who need those classes still astounds me."

If they didn't, they'd have to close their doors. I recently received a resume from a UC Berzerkeley grad, with a B.S. in Civil Engineering. One of the qualifications about which he bragged:
"I no AutoCAD 2008 and have passed there level three sertication."

I've had it framed! :o)

41 posted on 05/05/2008 8:09:34 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Jimmy Carter is the skidmark in the panties of American History)
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To: MadMax, the Grinning Reaper
Kids today are basically illiterate, both verbally and in writing, cannot form concise statement of fact to explain something, nor can they enunciate principles in a clear and articulate manner.

The easier to peel tax dollars from, my Pretties!

42 posted on 05/05/2008 8:14:45 PM PDT by an amused spectator (Spitzer would have used the Mann Act against an enemy in a New York minute.)
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To: brwnsuga

“Aird thinks the phenomenon is due in part to the evolution of a “consumer culture” in higher education.”

....the attitude is “I am the customer, you must please me”...the kid turns their work in late, cuts class, takes cell phone calls in class, flunks the mid term ect. and then bitches when they get a D....we gotta bring the draft back.


43 posted on 05/05/2008 8:27:04 PM PDT by STONEWALLS
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To: Lizavetta

“That colleges actually offer remedial math and English AND accept students who need those classes still astounds me.”

....I get exactly where you’re coming from Lizavetta but please, we can’t use the term “remedial” OK?....it might lower some one’s self esteem ;-) ...the appropriate term is “developmental English and Math”....my wife used to be a “developmental English” professor and it’s guaranteed job insurance for life....the supply of high school screw ups who can’t write a simple declarative sentence is endless....problem is, many of them are also lazy and indifferent and no fun to teach....five years was enough for my wife...


44 posted on 05/05/2008 8:41:32 PM PDT by STONEWALLS
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To: goodnesswins

“What’s really sad now is that I hesitate going to a “minority” doctor.....”

....I don’t hesitate at all...I don’t go to a minority doctor because they have the lowest MCAT scores*....med schools overlook that, and race norm the admittance standards to have “diversity” in the freshman class....this is just another way political correctness hurts society.

*MCAT is the med school aptitude test....just like the GRE for grad school


45 posted on 05/05/2008 8:52:47 PM PDT by STONEWALLS
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To: stylin19a
this grade inflation is rampant in HS.....one year, our medium size HS had 7 valedictorians....the kids stay away from the hard classes just so they can pad their gpa...

that same year,though, I was pleased to find out that a kid that was way down the list at #17 who had taken all the hard science courses got a full academic ride to Notre Dame....

46 posted on 05/05/2008 9:04:11 PM PDT by cherry
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To: goodnesswins
What’s really sad now is that I hesitate going to a “minority” doctor.....

That minority doctor still has to pass the medical boards. If that person was passed through school due to minority status, they'd get caught at the boards. In fact, I think they'd have problems in med school and wouldn't be able to coast on grade-inflated As and Bs received in undergrad.

I'm a minority and have a JD as well as a PhD. I am getting sick to death of the anti-minority bashing that seems to be more frequent on these boards. Obama hatred seems to have brought out the worst in my FReeper brothers and sisters lately. (I'm not an Obama supporter, nor a soldier in Operation Chaos. See the tagline; I don't vote for Dims.)

btw - White kids cry and moan about their grades all the time. They threaten to have their parents call, their parents' lawyer call, to go to the Dean, and everything else. It's NOT a minority issue, it's a 'students as customers' mindset held by the universities and colleges.

47 posted on 05/05/2008 9:15:32 PM PDT by radiohead (I stood up for Fred at the Iowa Caucus. Where were the rest of you so-called conservatives?)
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To: brwnsuga
Academia is selling America into the trash heap of “thirdworldism” by failing to demand academic performance from perfectly capable students.

Why - because teachers and professors are almost universally liberal and not working for what they get is a religion to them!

48 posted on 05/05/2008 9:16:01 PM PDT by HardStarboard (Take No Prisoners - We're Out Of Qurans)
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To: dangus
He’s not teaching at MIT.

Do the laws of chemistry or biology change at MIT? Facts are facts. Why not make NSU as good as MIT rather just another school for shirkers?

49 posted on 05/05/2008 9:18:04 PM PDT by Mind-numbed Robot (Not all that needs to be done, needs to be done by the government.)
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To: brwnsuga

It’s not possible to fully evaluate such student failures without looking at the course materials, exams and assignments, etc. to see if the instructor expectatons seem reasonable for an introductory course in that subject. It does sound like he is facing classrooms full of unprepared and non-performing students, but it is possible to crush just about any group of freshmen in the country if you make the exams hard enough and/or present so much material and such a difficult level that few freshmen anywhere would pass. Still, it doesn’t sound to me like that’s what is happening here — from the administrator comments it sounds to me as though they probably do have an extremely unprepared and ill-performing group of students, and the administration simply wants to keep passing bodies through the mill to keep the $$$ flowing.


50 posted on 05/05/2008 9:59:08 PM PDT by Enchante (Obama: My 1930s Foreign Policy Goes Well With My 1960s Social Policy!)
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