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Clinton's female fans wonder what if...and when
AP ^ | 5/17/2008 | Sara Kugler

Posted on 05/17/2008 5:35:19 PM PDT by Utah Girl

Philipina Heintzman, 81, drove 80 miles across the South Dakota prairie to experience history in the making: a woman running for president, something she never dreamed as a child that she would live to see.

That event, a Hillary Rodham Clinton rally in Bath on Thursday, also marked history unraveling.

As Clinton's prospects sink in the Democratic race, Heintzman and many women like her are feeling the poignant letdown of seeing the first woman with a strong chance at the presidency fall short.

"It would hurt my feelings a lot because I think she should be No. 1, she should be president," Heintzman said of Clinton's likely loss to Barack Obama. "Give a woman a chance to do something good."

From young feminist activists to the grandmothers who embrace Clinton along the rope line at her campaign events, many women who voted in large numbers for the former first lady during the primaries have begun mourning the turn of events. They know their dream of electing a female president this year probably will not come to pass — and wonder when it ever will.

"For us, getting a woman elected is major," said Laurine Glynn, 72, of New York City. "We've waited, fought a lot for this. I do worry that my generation won't see a female president."

"Women are feeling a lot of sadness, disappointment and some anger as they look back at what happened in this race," said Debbie Walsh, director of the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University.

And at least part of that anger, Walsh says, is directed at the sexism that some feel seriously harmed the former first lady's candidacy — from T-shirts bearing photos of Clinton and Obama with the slogan "Bros Before Hos" to Hillary Clinton nutcrackers sold in airports.

Women — especially older white women — have been at the center of Clinton's electoral base. During the primaries, she bested Obama among women overall 52-45 percent. Among women over 65, Clinton won by 61 percent to Obama's 34 percent.

Obama advisers note that he defeated Clinton among women in at least 12 states during the primary contest, in part because of overwhelming support for his candidacy among black women. Obama would be the first black president.

And among women under 30, Obama beat Clinton overall by a margin of 56-43 percent — suggesting that they were more inspired by Obama's message of hope and political change than they were by the prospect of electing one of their own.

Paula Horwitz, 84, of Pittsburgh, said some younger women "just don't understand. They'll elect a man, and the men will keep on telling the women what to do." Horwitz displayed a Clinton sign in her front yard for the Pennsylvania primary won by the New York senator.

The generational rift became even more apparent last week, when NARAL Pro-Choice America, a leading abortion rights advocacy organization dominated by white female activists, endorsed Obama over Clinton — producing an outcry among many in the women's movement who felt the group had betrayed one of its own.

Kate Michelman, the former president of NARAL who supports Obama, said Clinton didn't stand for the new direction that voters — including many women — now crave.

"Hillary Clinton represents the status quo at best, and keeps us rooted in a place we need to move from," Michelman said. "I've watched younger women come into their adult lives from a different set of experiences, and Hillary Clinton was not the president to make the transition to the newly inspired movement that we need."

For many women, Clinton's likely fate has also brought nagging questions for the future: Has the former first lady blazed a path, making it easier for the next wave of female candidates? Or has she merely shown how difficult it will be? And who might succeed her?

"What Hillary has done — win, lose or draw — has permanently changed the picture," says Marie Wilson, president of the White House Project, which trains women to run for office. "Next time, we're not going to have to prove that the public will vote for a woman. We won't have to prove competency. She has succeeded at that level."

Wilson pointed to several women with promising political futures who could one day seek the White House: Democratic Govs. Kathleen Sibelius of Kansas and Janet Napolitano of Arizona; Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota; and Republicans like Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and business executive Carly Fiorina. However, none has the name recognition, fundraising network or political connections Clinton was able to draw upon from the early days of her run.

Clinton's pioneering candidacy also won't necessarily mean the next female contender is going to have an easier time of it, warns Walsh.

"It will still be rough for women to come after her," she says. "They'll have to walk that balance of being strong and tough, compassionate and soft. When you're tough, you're called shrill, and the B-word. When you mist over, they say you're weeping."

To feminist writer Linda Hirshman, Clinton's likely defeat signals a harsh reality that future female candidates will need to consider.

"It shows how fragile the loyalty and commitment of women to a female candidate is. That's a pretty scary thing," says Hirshman. "She can count on the female electorate to divide badly and not be reliable."

For their part, Obama advisers said they believe that most of Clinton's female supporters will come their way eventually and won't throw their backing to Republican John McCain. The New York senator has already pledged to work actively on behalf of the Democratic nominee.

Many Clinton supporters hold out hope that Obama might consider choosing Clinton as his running mate. And since she is still relatively young at 60, some can envision another presidential bid.

Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill, who is supporting Obama, said his campaign was well aware of the disappointment Clinton's female supporters are likely to feel if she loses the race.

"I think the most important thing is that we stay focused on being incredibly respectful and admiring of who Hillary Clinton is as a person and what she represents as a leader," McCaskill said. "She's run a very strong race and deserves the passionate support she's received. I think the respect in the Obama campaign is genuine — we don't have any problem understanding why millions support Hillary Clinton."


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Government; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: 2008; hillary; womanpresident; womensvote
I am relieved that Hillary! is not going to be president. I am very worried about Obama being in that position. Both of them bode ill for this country if elected to the presidency.
1 posted on 05/17/2008 5:35:19 PM PDT by Utah Girl
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To: Utah Girl

They never called Margaret Thatcher a “B...”..Hillary deserves that name because she IS one!


2 posted on 05/17/2008 5:37:59 PM PDT by princess leah
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To: Utah Girl

well I sure hope she dies nice and quick. ANyone who drives 800 miles to see hillary shouldn’t be sucking up social security.


3 posted on 05/17/2008 5:38:17 PM PDT by utherdoul
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To: Utah Girl
"They'll elect a man, and the men will keep on telling the women what to do."

What a bitter old bag. She's obviously never seen what happens to men in divorce/custody cases.

4 posted on 05/17/2008 5:39:07 PM PDT by buccaneer81 (Bob Taft has soiled the family name for the next century.)
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To: Utah Girl

They come there wanting to feel estrogen. All they feel is testosterone. Must be global warming. Their sources could never be wrong.


5 posted on 05/17/2008 5:39:37 PM PDT by allmost
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To: Utah Girl

Identity politics AGAIN. Yes, she’s no Maggie Thatcher, but don’t write that obit just yet....


6 posted on 05/17/2008 5:40:12 PM PDT by Baladas (M)
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To: Utah Girl
"to experience history in the making: a woman running for president, something she never dreamed as a child that she would live to see." So this lady never heard of Elizabeth Dole? Hillary isn't the first female to run for prez.
7 posted on 05/17/2008 5:45:52 PM PDT by Mr. Blond
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Among the things I never dreamed as a child I’d see is me at my current age. I’m not disappointed that I have seen something that, at an early age, I never dreamed possible. I hope these poor women who didn’t get to see something they never dreamed possible can live with having not seen it become reality. It must be a real let down.


8 posted on 05/17/2008 5:47:45 PM PDT by KarinG1 (Opinions expressed in this post are my own and do not necessarily represent those of sane people.)
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To: Utah Girl
Philipina Heintzman, 81, drove 80 miles across the South Dakota prairie to experience history in the making: a woman running for president, something she never dreamed as a child that she would live to see.

Wow! If that's the high point of that woman's life, she must have had one hell of an uneventful life.

9 posted on 05/17/2008 5:52:39 PM PDT by appleharvey
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To: Utah Girl

There’s no fool like an old fool.


10 posted on 05/17/2008 6:01:08 PM PDT by Past Your Eyes (You knew the job was dangerous when you took it.)
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To: Utah Girl

>> And at least part of that anger, Walsh says, is directed at the sexism that some feel seriously harmed the former first lady’s candidacy

Yep, gotta be that ol’ “sexism”. Couldn’t possibly be the woman’s character or message. No way!


11 posted on 05/17/2008 6:12:27 PM PDT by Nervous Tick (La Raza hates white folks. And John McCain loves La Raza!)
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To: Nervous Tick

They will need to add a new scene to Vagina Monologues. Picture a vagina whining and complaining. A scorned vagina is a dangerous thing.


12 posted on 05/17/2008 6:19:50 PM PDT by doosee
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To: Utah Girl
Philipina Heintzman, 81, drove 80 miles across the South Dakota prairie to experience history in the making: a woman running for president, something she never dreamed as a child that she would live to see.

Did this 81-year-old never hear of Shirley Chisholm?

These Hillary-groupies are just pathetic and proof, I suppose, that there's no fool like an old fool.

13 posted on 05/17/2008 6:22:16 PM PDT by Rummyfan (Iraq: it's not about Iraq anymore, it's about the USA!)
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To: princess leah
Philipina Heintzman, 81, drove 80 miles across the South Dakota prairie to experience history in the making: a woman running for president, something she never dreamed as a child that she would live to see.

What a disappointment that must have been.

As they say "sometimes it's better to travel in hope than to arrive"

14 posted on 05/17/2008 6:22:42 PM PDT by Wil H
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To: appleharvey
Wow! If that's the high point of that woman's life, she must have had one hell of an uneventful life.

That's South Dakota for you...

15 posted on 05/17/2008 6:24:41 PM PDT by Wil H
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To: Utah Girl
Wilson pointed to several women with promising political futures who could one day seek the White House: Democratic Govs. Kathleen Sibelius of Kansas and Janet Napolitano of Arizona; Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota; and Republicans like Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and business executive Carly Fiorina.

Carly Fiorina? ROTFLMAO!!!!!!

16 posted on 05/17/2008 6:25:35 PM PDT by Rummyfan (Iraq: it's not about Iraq anymore, it's about the USA!)
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To: Utah Girl
"It would hurt my feelings a lot because I think she should be No. 1, she should be president," ... "Give a woman a chance to do something good."

That's typical female. Nothing about Hillary's agenda, accomplishments, nothing. Just feelings and give Hillary 'a chance.' because somehow she's supposed to deserve it because of her plumbing.

And lady, there have been plenty of women who've run for president, they've just been members of 3rd and 4th tier parties. I had lunch with one back in 1972. Shirley Chisholm also ran for president, I believe.

17 posted on 05/17/2008 6:29:59 PM PDT by radiohead (I stood up for Fred at the Iowa Caucus. Where were the rest of you so-called conservatives?)
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To: Utah Girl
Clinton's female fans wonder what if...

Hillary will divorce Bubba and begin looking anew in California?

18 posted on 05/17/2008 6:42:23 PM PDT by mikrofon (Huma's on her way out??)
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To: Rummyfan

Unfortunately, Carly Fiorina is one of the leaders of McCain’s campaign team!


19 posted on 05/17/2008 7:08:43 PM PDT by Seeking the truth (Queen Hillary faux postage stamps - 0cents.com)
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To: princess leah

I wasn’t paying much attention to politics when Lady Thatcher was in office, but from what I have read and heard about her, she could have thrown around the ‘sexist’ label to her opponents. That she didn’t shows that she is in a completely different class from Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton and many of her supporters.

I’m all for a female president, just not THIS one!


20 posted on 05/17/2008 7:17:01 PM PDT by Theresawithanh (..."I just said some things that weren't in keeping with what I knew to be the case." - HRC)
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To: Utah Girl
"We've waited, fought a lot for this. I do worry that my generation won't see a female president."

My generation would happily settle for a competent one in '08.

I just don't like any of these idiots. Sigh.
21 posted on 05/17/2008 7:27:04 PM PDT by Dominnae (When asked by a Persian emissary for his weapons, King Leonidas said "Come and take them.")
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To: Utah Girl
" history in the making: a woman running for president, something she never dreamed as a child that she would live to see."

What? The Hillbeast is not the first woman to run for president. Dems are such hypocrites.

22 posted on 05/17/2008 8:18:21 PM PDT by gedeon3
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To: Utah Girl

Before Elizabeth Dole and Shirley Chisholm, there was Margaret Chase Smith in 1964. She didn’t actually run, but her name was put in nomination at the Republican convention. And I think there was a suffragette/saloon wrecker type trying to run for pres way back before that. I’m not sure women could even vote yet; at least that one was before my time!


23 posted on 05/17/2008 8:52:06 PM PDT by CatDancer (I refuse to admit what I have to do until the Election Day I have to do it.)
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To: utherdoul

“well I sure hope she dies nice and quick. ANyone who drives 800 miles to see hillary shouldn’t be sucking up social security.’


It was 80 miles, not 800. Would you say this if she was your mother or grandmother? If my mother was living, she’d probably be supporting Hillary, too, with some of the same reasons, in spite of my arguments. We ARE still allowed to support who we wish to and not die for it, right? This year.


24 posted on 05/17/2008 8:53:50 PM PDT by CatDancer (I refuse to admit what I have to do until the Election Day I have to do it.)
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To: buccaneer81

“What a bitter old bag. ...”


Bitter?? Been listening to B.Hussein O.?

That lady is simply part of a generation of women who did expect men to tell them what to do, but mostly who had sense enough to see “womens’ lib” for what it was and never became feminists. Unlike their daughters - Hillary’s generation.


25 posted on 05/17/2008 8:57:31 PM PDT by CatDancer (I refuse to admit what I have to do until the Election Day I have to do it.)
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To: CatDancer
As with the NAACP, which is really the NAA(L)CP. Non liberals are rarely accorded an acknowledgement of their existence, let alone recognition of their accomplishments as presidential candidates.

HF

26 posted on 05/17/2008 9:23:20 PM PDT by holden
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To: CatDancer

my grandparents are still living thank you and my Paternal grandmother at least would agree with me. She probably hates Hillary more than I do.


27 posted on 05/17/2008 9:30:03 PM PDT by utherdoul
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To: Utah Girl

It would hurt my feelings a lot because I think she should be No. 1, she should be president,”

Can you see a quote from a guy that would say... “ it will hurt my feelings if my candidate isnt elected...”

or this one...

“For us, getting a woman elected is major,”

So anyone with a Vagina should be the number one factor in choosing your president....

uhmm yeah okay


28 posted on 05/17/2008 10:26:50 PM PDT by Walkingfeather
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To: radiohead
/That's typical female.

Now you've hurt my feelings! Don't you understand? The all-important qualification in the coming election is that the winner be a WOMAN! Any woman. (sarc, obviously)

The brainless, sadly, have the right to vote, even if it takes the Dems dragging them out of their houses, apartments, etc. to cast their ignorant ballots.

29 posted on 05/17/2008 10:32:13 PM PDT by IIntense (o)
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To: radiohead
Give a woman a chance to do something good.

What an inane comment that is! The woman is saying, in essence, that women have no opportunity to "do good"; that a woman has to be president in order to "do somthing good".

This woman was behind the door when God was handing out brains.

Just ask any man if he could, or would want to, take over all the responsibilities of his wife. Ha!

30 posted on 05/17/2008 10:44:44 PM PDT by IIntense (o)
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To: IIntense
even if it takes the Dems dragging them out of their houses, apartments, etc. to cast their ignorant ballots.

I see you've been to Philadelphia. : )

31 posted on 05/18/2008 12:13:08 AM PDT by radiohead (I stood up for Fred at the Iowa Caucus. Where were the rest of you so-called conservatives?)
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To: Utah Girl

I do have some liberal friends..... a couple of them are professional (retired) women, one in her 60s, one in her 70s..... those two heartily despise Hillary but are both big Obama fans. Go figure. We can’t talk politics much or it would hurt our friendships, but I gather that they both regard Hillary as a compulsive liar and fraud, so there are at least some liberal women who are not gaga over Hillary. Now if only I could disabuse them of their high regard for Obama......


32 posted on 05/18/2008 12:20:25 AM PDT by Enchante (Barack Chamberlain: My 1930s Appeasement Policy Goes Well With My 1960s Socialist Policies!)
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To: buccaneer81; Mr. Blonde; Utah Girl

“I just sensed a great disturbance in the force. It was as if millions of femininists cried out as one voice and were then silenced.”


33 posted on 05/18/2008 2:51:14 AM PDT by The Ghost of Rudy McRomney (Using Hillary to nip Obama's heels is like beating a dead horse with an armed nuclear bomb.)
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To: radiohead
I see you've been to Philadelphia.

Not only BEEN to the "City of Brotherly Love"...spent most of my young years in southwest Philly. It's most likely accurate to say that kids who grew up in the various neighborhoods have memories of their fun-filled childhood days.

We lived in rowhouses, walked to school, walked home for lunch, walked back and, and end of school day, did the same.

School buses? What are they???

The buses were introduced when my youngest brother (8 yrs. younger) was in grade school~early 50s.

Due to the "white exodus" to suburbia, many Philly neighborhoods rapidly deteriorated.

Shall we put the blame on the whites who abandoned the city because they could afford, and preferred, single homes in the suburbs?

34 posted on 05/20/2008 12:18:04 AM PDT by IIntense (o)
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