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To: Dinsdale
Lee on the other hand doesn’t deserve the praise he gets. Granting he was tactically a genius that doesn’t give him a pass on his lack of insight into the effective range issue. He could have blitzed Washington DC.

Lee blew it several times, but he was able to adjust his ways, although it was way too late and way too many of his men had to die before he did. What he started to do at the end of the war in regards to trench warfare would be seen again in France in the first World War. Unfortunately trench warfare itself is a horrible way to fight and die, but he was recognized for his contributions (and it was not due to any kind of tactical genius of his, but more to his engineering and analytical side).
35 posted on 05/22/2008 1:40:45 PM PDT by af_vet_rr
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To: af_vet_rr
Lee's major failing, IMHO, was as a strategist. At the operational level, he had few peers, but as a senior general, whose advice was sought, and listened to, by one of the most difficult chief executives of any country in history [Davis]; his lack of strategic insight was mind boggling.

I don't know if he considered the Confederacy an appendage, or an ally of Virginia, but he doesn't seem to have seen it as a polity superior to his native state.

Case in point, the run up to the Gettysburg campaign. There were major discussions in Richmond about sending Lee and two Corps of his army to the West, which was the critical theater of operations in the Civil War, to help Bragg.
Lee did NOT want to go. So he proposed the raid into Pennsylvania in its stead. That is strategic myopia to the level of near blindness. And the South paid.

49 posted on 05/23/2008 7:20:43 AM PDT by PzLdr ("The Emperor is not as forgiving as I am" - Darth Vader)
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