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To: COBOL2Java

Personally, I think the story behind this book can probably be traced from looking at each of the drafts.

I bet he secured a deal and then turned in his manuscript, only to have it returned with the comment “there’s nothing here, you need to spice it up if you want a best seller”

this led him down a path to more and more outrageous assertions until the publishers were happy with the product.

This would explain why his former colleagues are saying “this isn’t the Scott McClellan we knew”.


21 posted on 05/28/2008 7:57:50 PM PDT by Wil H
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To: Wil H
I can't imagine him burning all of his bridges just for a best seller. It's possible that there is some major financial incentive (beyond the book sales) which led to this, or maybe someone has some dirt on him like photo's of a Scott Ritter moment with some internet friends.

In any case, he never came off as a quick thinker even it was his job, so now he'll probably talk himself into legal trouble.

23 posted on 05/28/2008 8:20:08 PM PDT by kaboom
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To: Wil H

McClellan writes: “History appears poised to confirm what most Americans today have decided — that the decision to invade Iraq was a serious strategic blunder.”

In fact, “history” is poised to do no such thing. Al-Qaida is on the run, and the U.S. is on the cusp of victory in Iraq (for another view of our success in the War on Terror, see “Verbatim,” page A11). Years from now we think Americans will see this as a turning point in history, a time when an American leader stood up to protect Western Civilization following the barbarous attacks of 9/11.

We don’t have space here to refute everything. But one charge in McClellan’s 341-page tome stands out, so we’ll focus on that: The Bush White House conducted a dishonest “political propaganda campaign” to sell the war to the American people.

Start with the obvious: Wasn’t it McClellan’s job to resign in protest if he thought the American people were being misled? If so, this was his own failing, not Bush’s.

Moreover, contrary to the common wisdom, Bush’s rationale for taking out Saddam Hussein was about many things — not just one.

Yes, he expressed concern Saddam would get a nuclear weapon with which to blackmail both his neighbors and the West.

But Bush also wanted to halt the spread of terror, deny a possible haven for al-Qaida, and promote democracy in the Mideast, among other things. As ex-Pentagon official Doug Feith recently noted, Bush delivered 24 major speeches on Iraq from Sept. 2002 to Sept. 2004. In them, he made a wide-ranging, nuanced case for getting rid of Saddam. It wasn’t only about WMD.

Yet, McClellan claims Bush was “shading the truth.” Well, what truth did he shade? WMD? In fact, the CIA assessment of Iraq that Bush used was made during President Clinton’s final year in office. It said that Saddam had a WMD program and, quite possibly, a nuclear weapon. Every major intelligence agency — Britain’s, France’s, Russia’s, Germany’s, Israel’s, even the U.N.’s — agreed.

Yes, as it turns out, some of that intelligence was wrong. Even so, reasons for getting rid of Saddam were too numerous to ignore. In October of 2002, Congress cited no fewer than 23 reasons when it overwhelmingly gave Bush the right to remove Saddam.

Bush was clear from the start, and dead honest: This was about defending our nation from the insane jihadists who had declared war on us from their safe-havens in the Mideast. McClellan, blinded by his anger, can’t see this. The American people someday will.

http://www.ibdeditorials.com/IBDArticles.aspx?id=296866878266430


24 posted on 05/28/2008 8:24:33 PM PDT by roses of sharon ( (Who will be McCain's maverick?))
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