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To: PsyOp

I didn’t miss the point. VDH’s ASSUMPTION is probably correct. But the FACT is the British gave as their SOLE reason for going to war the German invasion of Poland. And if Hanson can [rightly] challenge Buchanan’s factual errors [as well as Buchanan’s asuumptions], I can feel free to point out his.


37 posted on 06/16/2008 8:37:51 AM PDT by PzLdr ("The Emperor is not as forgiving as I am" - Darth Vader)
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To: PzLdr
I didn’t miss the point. VDH’s ASSUMPTION is probably correct. But the FACT is the British gave as their SOLE reason for going to war the German invasion of Poland. And if Hanson can [rightly] challenge Buchanan’s factual errors [as well as Buchanan’s asuumptions], I can feel free to point out his.

That would be because the invasion was the triggering event. And if you had been alive and paying attention in 1939, no one would have had to explain this to you because it would have been taken for granted as common knowledge.

Again... I the reason for the treaty with Poland was to end the German violations of the treaty of Versailles (a fact that was understood by people at that time). It was thought that such a declaration would bring the Germans up short and stop further aggression and violations of the treaty. It did not, because it was too little, too late.

And while I am sure you are very competent on WWII as relates to battles and such, you seem to know nothing of the inter-war politics that led up to the war other than the basic superficial stuff they teach in school. The invasion of Poland was the only public reason uttered, because it was the last and final event in a long train of events.

So, yes, you did miss the point.

43 posted on 06/16/2008 8:55:47 AM PDT by PsyOp (Truth in itself is rarely sufficient to make men act. - Clauswitz, On War, 1832.)
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To: PzLdr
Communication from the German Government to the British Government, Handed by Joachim von Ribbentrop, Minister for Foreign Affairs, to the British Ambassador (Sir Neville Henderson) at 11:20 A.M., September 3, 1939

"The German Government have received the British Government's ultimatum of the 3rd September, 1939. They have the honour to reply as follows: -

"1. The German Government and the German people refuse to receive, accept, let alone to fulfill, demands in the nature of ultimata made by the British Government.

"2. On our eastern frontier there has for many months already reigned a condition of war. Since the time when the Versailles Treaty first tore Germany to pieces, all and every peaceful settlement was refused to all German Governments. The National Socialist Government also has since the year 1933 tried again and again to remove by peaceful negotiations the worst rapes and breaches of justice of this treaty. The British Government have been among those who, by their intransigent attitude, took the chief part in frustrating every practical revision. Without the intervention of the British Government - of this the German Government and German people are fully conscious - a reasonable solution doing justice to both sides would certainly have been found between Germany and Poland. For Germany did not have the intention nor had she raised the demands of annihilating Poland. The Reich demanded only the revision of those articles of the Versailles Treaty which already at the time of the formulation of that Dictate had been described by understanding statesmen of all nations as being in the long run unbearable, and therefore impossible for a great nation and also for the entire political and economic interests of Eastern Europe. British statesmen, too, declared the solution in the East which was then forced upon Germany as containing the germ of future wars. To remove this danger was the desire of all German Governments and especially the intention of the new National Socialist People's Government. The blame for having prevented this peaceful revision lies with the British Cabinet policy."

Thought you might be interested in reading this. No doubt this is one of the documents referred to by Buchannan in his book. What you should note, however, is the references to the treaty of Versailles. Even the Germans understood the reason for the British-French-Polish treaty.

47 posted on 06/16/2008 9:08:50 AM PDT by PsyOp (Truth in itself is rarely sufficient to make men act. - Clauswitz, On War, 1832.)
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