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Apologia pro redneck, Or: In defense of a word — and a people
Jewish World Review ^ | June 17, 2008 | Paul Greenberg

Posted on 06/17/2008 9:27:23 AM PDT by rhema

This time it's a duly certified, establishment-vetted, card-carrying member of the Mainstream Media who's been caught, tried and convicted by the always watchful PC Police. This time it was no Howard Stern or Don Imus, or even a football coach lettin' 'er rip at a press conference. This time it was NBC's own, always respectable if not downright pedestrian Andrea Mitchell, aka Mrs. Alan Greenspan. Goodness. What did she do? It seems the lady went and referred to an area of southwestern Virginia as "redneck, sort of bordering-on-Appalachia country."

Ooh-wee!The linguistically delicate of southwestern Virginia are still squealing. These easily offended types must be crying in their martinis — because the folks who prefer Schlitz couldn't care less. The real rednecks in southwestern Virginia must be wondering what all the fuss is about.

It happened when Ms. Mitchell was using her cultivated nasal tones to describe footage of a campaign stop by the Democratic presidential nominee presumptive and a former governor of Virginia in lovely Bristol, Va. And this is what she dared say:

"Interesting images today ... Barack Obama, Mark Warner in southwest Virginia. This is real redneck, sort of bordering-on-Appalachia country...."

You'd have thought she said Those Dumb Crackers. All overly sensitive heck broke loose on the poor woman.

The speech cops swooped down on her in an instant. How dare she use the R-word? The local paper got all uppity. To quote the Bristol Herald Courier: "To correct Mitchell, Bristol doesn't border 'Appalachia ... country.' It is part of the Appalachian Mountain region. While the region faces challenges, it doesn't deserve to be the butt of jokes."

The butt of jokes?

(Excerpt) Read more at jewishworldreview.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; US: Virginia
KEYWORDS: andreamitchell; apology; appalachia; markwarner; media; mitchell; obama; paulgreenberg; redneck; ruralvote; va2008; webb

1 posted on 06/17/2008 9:27:23 AM PDT by rhema
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To: rhema
This entire article is pure BS. The only reason any thing was made of the statement was because it was directed at a specific group of people.

Unlike all the other racist words, one can say Redneck or Cracker at will on TV, the movies etc. Might not be wise for a presidential candidate but using the word itself carries none of the baggage of any other ethnic slur.

Of course the fact that using it is exactly the same thing doesn't matter. Poor Whites, especially Southern ones are fair game for the media.

2 posted on 06/17/2008 9:33:30 AM PDT by yarddog
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To: yarddog

Whyyyy,fiddledeedee


3 posted on 06/17/2008 9:39:00 AM PDT by Whiplash (does anyone really, truly give a rip about this?)
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To: yarddog

Yep, a single word can get people in trouble.

Remember George Allen got in trouble for “macaca” and that was the beginning of the end for his campaign.

And remember a few years ago, somebody in Washington DC bureaucracy got fired because he said he wanted to be “niggardly” with the taxpayer’s money, and make sure it was spent properly. Because it sounded similar to a racial slur, he was summarily dismissed from his job.

Words only have meaning for Republicans, or if the words can be used by the politically correct crowd. Robert Byrd, formerly of the KKK, said something about “there are white N****rs, too” on a TV interview, and nothing was ever said again about that. Imagine the reaction if a white Republican had said something like that.


4 posted on 06/17/2008 9:39:38 AM PDT by Dilbert San Diego
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To: rhema

Ms. Mitchell doesn’t know squat about South Western Virginia, Bristol, or rednecks. To her, any place outstide of New York City is redneck country. In her honor I will be placing a sign on the highway outside my hometown: “Welcome to Virginia, Ms. Mitchell! Now ya’all turn around and git on home.”


5 posted on 06/17/2008 9:44:45 AM PDT by PowderMonkey (Will Work for Ammo)
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To: PowderMonkey
Ms. Mitchell doesn’t know squat about South Western Virginia, Bristol, or rednecks. To her, any place outstide of New York City is redneck country. In her honor I will be placing a sign on the highway outside my hometown: “Welcome to Virginia, Ms. Mitchell! Now ya’all turn around and git on home.”

Ditto that. The only thing Andrea-Nicole Mitchell is good at is separating networks from their money while providing nothing of value in return.

6 posted on 06/17/2008 10:01:52 AM PDT by Niteranger68 (It would suck to be a white relative of Obama.)
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To: rhema
The real rednecks in southwestern Virginia must be wondering what all the fuss is about.

Speaking as a real redneck from Southwest Virginia I'm wondering how Paul Greenburg knows that we think?

I'm just askin'.

7 posted on 06/17/2008 10:03:48 AM PDT by Corin Stormhands
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To: rhema
Who are these rednecks anyway? One inadequate definition would be to say they're the descendants of the Scots-Irish who pushed the American frontier across first the Appalachians and then ever westward, spreading as far north as the hills of Pennsylvania and as far south and west as wide-open Texas, leaving their manners, speech and customs an indelible if often unremarked part of the American character.

Oh, yes,rednecks are also fighters. Which means that, ignored and snubbed in times of peace, or just patronized by those who think their very name an insult, they are always called on when the country's in real trouble. To this day, they are part of the backbone of the United States military. They are, in short, people to tie to. They will stand their ground, as America's enemies have discovered since 1776 and long before. They need no one to come to their defense, let alone shield them from their honest name. Yes, they can be touchy, but only about matters of honor.


8 posted on 06/17/2008 10:09:31 AM PDT by Donald Rumsfeld Fan ("Sincerity is everything. If you can fake that, youÂ’ve got it made." Groucho Marx)
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To: Corin Stormhands
Southerner Greenburg isn't thin-skinned; he wears what some consider an epithet as a badge of honor, I'm guessing. He's been a columnist for the Arkansas Democrat Gazette for decades.
9 posted on 06/17/2008 10:13:59 AM PDT by rhema ("Break the conventions; keep the commandments." -- G. K. Chesterton)
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To: Corin Stormhands

“Speaking as a real redneck from Southwest Virginia I’m wondering how Paul Greenburg knows that we think?

I’m just askin’. “

This is a common journalistic over-reach: claiming to be able to read other people’s minds for them, and report the results to their readership. Not only journalists have this failing, but they especially make real jackasses of themselves in print (or recording) whenever they presume to tell us what’s on someone else’s mind.


10 posted on 06/17/2008 10:15:14 AM PDT by Blue_Ridge_Mtn_Geek
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To: rhema

He ain’t from Virginia though, now is he?


11 posted on 06/17/2008 10:17:01 AM PDT by Corin Stormhands
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To: rhema
Redneck reparations:



A semi-tractor-trailer full of Coors and a Firebird in every driveway.
12 posted on 06/17/2008 10:18:49 AM PDT by Liberty Valance (Keep a simple manner for a happy life)
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To: Blue_Ridge_Mtn_Geek

See post 9. Arkansan Greenberg has probably had the appellation applied more often to him than have most Virginians.


13 posted on 06/17/2008 10:19:24 AM PDT by rhema ("Break the conventions; keep the commandments." -- G. K. Chesterton)
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To: rhema
Paul Greenberg misses the whole point of this episode.

Ms. Mitchell was simply reiterating the derogatory sense that these "Democratic strategists" have for the Appalachian region of the United States. She condescendingly described the town as if it was some type of an archeological oddity. This area is not some 'lost tribe' for goodness sakes! It was a vital part of building this country throughout its history.

14 posted on 06/17/2008 10:22:29 AM PDT by Ghengis (Of course freedom is free. If it wasn't, it would be called expensivedom. ~Cindy Sheehan 11/11/06)
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To: Liberty Valance

Lord knows they’re deserving, considering all the disdainful calumny they’ve endured.


15 posted on 06/17/2008 10:26:37 AM PDT by rhema ("Break the conventions; keep the commandments." -- G. K. Chesterton)
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To: rhema; Blue_Ridge_Mtn_Geek
Arkansan Greenberg has probably had the appellation applied more often to him than have most Virginians.

Perhaps. And my only snark at Greenberg was that he was tending to over-generalize, which is not unlike what Andrea Mitchell did.

But neither you, nor Greenburg, nor Andrea Mitchell understand the mindset of Southwestern Virginians. It was much the same mindset when George Allen welcomed "macaca" to "the real Virginia." (and that, as much of the made up word was what was used against him).

Those who are born, live and die in Southwest Virginia are in fact sensitive about those from the "outside" telling them what their lives are like. They recognize that Jonesville, Virginia is west of Detroit and closer to the capitals of 7 (I think 7) other states than it is to Richmond. They understand that Southwest Virginia only begins at Roanoke. That was what Allen meant (and understood) when he said "the real Virginia." These folks feel abandoned by Richmond and Washington.

Granted, that's also an overgeneralization. Not everyone feels that way. Not everyone gives a rip.

The flap with Andrea Mitchell was far less about the use of the term redneck than it was about someone from the "outside" trying to describe what Southwest Virginians are all about.

16 posted on 06/17/2008 10:32:49 AM PDT by Corin Stormhands
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To: Ghengis
Paul Greenberg misses the whole point of this episode.

I don't think so. He's a Southerner (he coined the term Slick Willie long before Bill ever slunk out of Arkansas) who knows all the nuances and applications of redneck.

17 posted on 06/17/2008 10:38:23 AM PDT by rhema ("Break the conventions; keep the commandments." -- G. K. Chesterton)
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To: rhema
Paul Greenberg misses the whole point of this episode.

I don't think so. He's a Southerner (he coined the term Slick Willie long before Bill ever slunk out of Arkansas) who knows all the nuances and applications of redneck.

I beg to differ. We can all compare our "Redneck" bona fides to varying levels of success. But, in this instance, Paul Greenberg is ignoring the fact that Andrea Mitchell was looking down her Washington D.C. nose at this region of the country. By her own admission, no less!

Obama's "Cling to their guns..." and Mitchell's "Redneck" comments reflect how they think very accurately.

18 posted on 06/17/2008 10:55:44 AM PDT by Ghengis (Of course freedom is free. If it wasn't, it would be called expensivedom. ~Cindy Sheehan 11/11/06)
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To: rhema
Redneck, in modern usage, predominantly refers to a particular stereotype of people who may be found in many regions of the United States and Canada. Originally limited to the Appalachians, and later the South, Ozarks and Rocky Mountains, this stereotype is now widespread in northern states and the Canadian provinces.

The National Covenant and The Solemn League and Covenant (a.k.a. Covenanters) signed documents stating that Scotland desired a Presbyterian Church government, and rejected the Church of England as their official church (no Anglican congregation was ever accepted as the official church in Scotland). What the Covenanters rejected was episcopacy — rule by bishops — the preferred form of church government in England. Many of the Covenanters signed these documents using their own blood, and many in the movement began wearing red pieces of cloth around their neck to signify their position to the public. They were referred to as rednecks.[1] Large numbers of these Scottish Presbyterians migrated from their lowland Scottish home to Ulster (the northern province of Ireland) and soon settled in considerable numbers in North America throughout the 18th century. Some emigrated directly from Scotland to the American colonies in the late 18th and early 19th-centuries as a result of the Lowland Clearances. This etymological theory holds that since many Scots-Irish Americans and Scottish Americans who settled in Appalachia and the South were Presbyterian, the term was bestowed upon them and their descendants.

Wikipedia

19 posted on 06/17/2008 11:05:40 AM PDT by Donald Rumsfeld Fan ("Sincerity is everything. If you can fake that, youÂ’ve got it made." Groucho Marx)
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To: Donald Rumsfeld Fan
The term “redneck” gained common usage in the US to refer to the WV coalminers that battled the mine owners in the battle of Blair Mountain in 1921.

10-15K of them wore red bandannas around their necks to show which side they were on.

20 posted on 06/17/2008 12:01:06 PM PDT by Beagle8U (FreeRepublic -- One stop shopping ....... Its the Conservative Super WalMart for news .)
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To: rhema
So what term are we enlightened. reconstructed, re-educated Americans of the thoroughly thought-reformed 21st century supposed to use instead of "redneck"

How about "Appalachian American?"

It has a nice ring to it, if I do say so myself.

21 posted on 06/17/2008 12:09:48 PM PDT by curiosity
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To: Ghengis
But, in this instance, Paul Greenberg is ignoring the fact that Andrea Mitchell was looking down her Washington D.C. nose at this region of the country. By her own admission, no less!

So what? Who cares what a media mannequin says? We Southerners know what we're made of. 

22 posted on 06/17/2008 12:46:01 PM PDT by JoJo Gunn (Help control the girly-man population. Have the McCainiacs spayed or neutered.)
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To: Beagle8U
The term “redneck” gained common usage in the US to refer to the WV coalminers that battled the mine owners in the battle of Blair Mountain in 1921.

I've done a little research into the etymology of the term and found that the earliest use of it was with the Scot-Irish wearing the red bandanna around their neck during the Scots-English Civil Wars.

They are descendants of the clans depicted in the movie Braveheart.

Also the term "hillbilly" has a similar etymology. Derived from a group dubbed the "Billy Boys" from northern Scotland who also fought the English.

They were all fiercely independent and valued freedom and honor. "Hillbilly" and "Redneck" have a common heritage.

Proud Redneck.

23 posted on 06/17/2008 1:23:41 PM PDT by Donald Rumsfeld Fan ("Sincerity is everything. If you can fake that, youÂ’ve got it made." Groucho Marx)
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To: JoJo Gunn
So what? Who cares what a media mannequin says? We Southerners know what we're made of.

Actually, I appreciate much of Paul Greenberg's work. I just take disagree that this is condescension is not worthy of noting.

Anyone who is raised in the Appalachian hills knows how to take the hit. There's just some times that I choose not to. When we being told why the 'Post Racial, all inclusive, Messiah' is campaigning somewhere because it is "Redneck"...Well, I think that worth pointing out when we're not supposed to mention his middle name. Or his wife's loony comments. Or his shady dealings with criminal characters. Or his close association with racists. And on and on.

24 posted on 06/17/2008 4:09:50 PM PDT by Ghengis (Of course freedom is free. If it wasn't, it would be called expensivedom. ~Cindy Sheehan 11/11/06)
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To: rhema
I used to read the Arkansas Democrat Gazette whenever I traveled through Arkansas. Despite the name, Greenburg was always pretty conservative.

Don't care for this article tho.

25 posted on 06/17/2008 6:28:47 PM PDT by yarddog
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To: Liberty Valance

Nice shot from Atlanta.


26 posted on 06/17/2008 6:43:47 PM PDT by Hilltop (Control the high ground. Control the battlefield.)
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To: Ghengis
What name can't we say?

Barack Hussein Obama?

27 posted on 06/17/2008 7:59:19 PM PDT by JoJo Gunn (Help control the girly-man population. Have the McCainiacs spayed or neutered.)
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To: Donald Rumsfeld Fan
Note that I said “In common usage in The US”.

Most of those miners in the Blair Mountain war were of Scot-Irish ancestry.

28 posted on 06/18/2008 4:08:44 AM PDT by Beagle8U (FreeRepublic -- One stop shopping ....... Its the Conservative Super WalMart for news .)
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To: Beagle8U
Most of those miners in the Blair Mountain war were of Scot-Irish ancestry.

Of course....it goes without saying.

29 posted on 06/18/2008 7:18:45 AM PDT by Donald Rumsfeld Fan ("Sincerity is everything. If you can fake that, youÂ’ve got it made." Groucho Marx)
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To: rhema
I find it funny!

We "Rednecks" "Crackers", and "Honkies", don't need to be defended against these insulated white north eastern types.

We know who we are, and find it amusing that while we don't look down our noses at them; For all their preconceived notions and their puffed up cultured sensibilities, they still manage to parade their self indulgent stupidity of a class A fool to the world, by looking down their's, at us.

How typical.

30 posted on 06/18/2008 10:21:19 PM PDT by Hillarys nightmare (So Proud to be living in "Jesus Land" ! Don't you wish everyone did?)
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To: Caipirabob

Ping for international caipirahood or redneckness or whatever the generic term may be.


31 posted on 06/18/2008 10:50:16 PM PDT by aposiopetic
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To: aposiopetic
We just spent a week in TN getting in touch with "my inner redneck". We were in Pigeon Forge on the East side (I was born in Memphis but we moved early on.)

The family loved it!

Cabin was beautiful...here's a shot with the bottle of "moonshine" we had to try. YEEHAW!

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Thanks for the ping!

32 posted on 06/19/2008 1:48:27 AM PDT by Caipirabob (Communists... Socialists... Democrats...Traitors... Who can tell the difference?)
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To: Hillarys nightmare
We know who we are, and find it amusing that while we don't look down our noses at them; For all their preconceived notions and their puffed up cultured sensibilities, they still manage to parade their self indulgent stupidity of a class A fool to the world, by looking down their's, at us.

I've been targeted with more words and looks of disdain, harrumphing, sneering, and superciliousness than I can count. Big deal. Goes with the territory. A Man I admire and try to emulate said, "Woe to you if the whole world speaks well of you."

33 posted on 06/19/2008 2:01:07 PM PDT by rhema ("Break the conventions; keep the commandments." -- G. K. Chesterton)
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To: rhema
"A Man I admire and try to emulate said, "Woe to you if the whole world speaks well of you."

I know of whom you speak, and bless his name!

Hang in there brother. I believe they're astounded when we don't react as they would, when they try to label us with their derogatory names,

They are the ones who don't realize that we were all formed from the same dust; and the little bit of difference they perceive, is merely an illusion.

34 posted on 06/19/2008 9:26:21 PM PDT by Hillarys nightmare (So Proud to be living in "Jesus Land" ! Don't you wish everyone did?)
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To: Corin Stormhands

I live near Archie’s Knob, on the NC side, an afternoon stroll away from Claudeville. We moved here in 1998, and spend recreational time along the Blue Ridge Parkway, and the counties north and west in Virginia. Maybe after a few decades of working, worshipping, and making music with the neighbors we will get to know them better, and by the time our grandchildren are starting their families, people may start to think they are “from around here”.

I play the fiddle and sing, and crunch financial models in Winston-Salem for a living. When they put me out to pasture in a few years, I will have more time to read, write, fiddle, sing, and hang out nearby. In the meantime I do a lot of reading of local history online and, decreasingly, in the local libraries, and take my time building memories of the mountain scenery when I pass through on the way to visits to relatives in the Midwest (Iowa, Wisconsin). Over the past decade, the roads between Danville, Martinsville, and points west (58) and connectors from Abingdon north into Kentucky have been improved and widened, and I prefer them to I81 and I77, except when I have business in PA or Washington, when I cut north through Floyd County to I81, and then take 81 if it’s PA, or exit at Luray and go through Shenandoah National Park if the destination is the Washington area.

If Richmond, Raleigh, and Rome-on-the-Potomac leave us and our neighbors to fend for ourselves, the area will be even more appealing. I have my doubts that events will lead to such an outcome, though it’s possible I suppose. Meanwhile, through growing home educator networks, and access to high speed internet connections to the rest of the world, we can bypass these centers and tap into the resources needed to raise a generation of heirs who can navigate their way through the world that will grow out of the successors to the printing press and the institutions which emerged from its impact on the diffusion of knowledge. As was the case in the 15th to 18th centuries the existing institutions will probably never figure out what’s happening to them before they are superceded by whatever comes next. It probably won’t take that many centuries either, though we are only a little more than half a century into the digital age, so it’s still too early to tell.


35 posted on 06/24/2008 5:50:26 PM PDT by Blue_Ridge_Mtn_Geek
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