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Americans Migrate Back To The Cities
The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 6-19-2008

Posted on 06/19/2008 2:35:55 PM PDT by blam

Americans migrate back to the cities

By Tom Leonard in New York
Last Updated: 2:23AM BST 19/06/2008

Americans are choosing to abandon the suburban sprawl in favour of a more comfortable, cheaper and greener life in the city centre.

Americans flocked to the suburbs after the WWII. Soaring energy prices and the sub-prime crisis are driving them back to the cities

The mass migration of America's middle classes from urban areas to the suburbs amounted to a demographic revolution in the years after the Second World War.

But the so-called "driveable suburb" is becoming increasingly unfeasible as soaring fuel costs make a long commute too expensive for many.

Higher energy prices are also having a disproportionate impact on bigger homes, such as those found in the suburbs, as they inevitably cost much more to heat in winter and cool in America's often fiercely hot summers.

The sub-prime mortgage crisis has accelerated this flight to the cities – experts have christened it New Urbanism – as property prices have particularly collapsed in more remote areas.

According to a poll for Reuters, about 10 per cent of Americans said they were considering moving closer to work while roughly the same percentage said they were thinking about getting a job closer to home.

John Zogby, a political pollster, said the findings added up to a "broad cultural change" which translated into millions of people considering a major transformation in their lives.

He said: "Low energy costs and the availability of autos helped fuel suburbanisation."

But as people concluded that high energy prices were here to stay, "this is now one of those big changes in our lives that requires nothing short of dramatic lifestyle changes," he said.

Even before the latest economic downturn, demand for urban living had been rekindled among two generations – the so-called "baby boomers" in their fifties and "millenials", the latter born between the late 1970s and mid-1990s.

Both are already drifting away from the suburbs, the baby boomers because they want smaller homes and more accessible amenities, and the millenials to rebel against their cul-de-sac upbringing.

Transportation is now the second biggest household expense in the US after housing. Much of the new demand for city homes is in neighbourhoods close to light railway stations, hastening the move away from a car culture.

Some towns around cities have responded to this exodus by rejecting suburban status and working hard to reinvent their own centres.

Americans are not just reconsidering their living arrangements because of the latest economic downturn.

Nearly 39 per cent of those surveyed in the Reuters/Zogby poll said they were considering changing holiday plans, while 31 per cent plan fewer restaurant visits.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: americans; center; city; gasprices; housing; migration; suburbs; urban
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I've not seen any evidence of migrations back to the city. Has anyone else?
1 posted on 06/19/2008 2:35:56 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

Well, Seattle population has grown tremendously, in all colors. Interestingly, while the population has ballooned the number of children that are registered in the public school system has declined significantly (I want to say 20%, but I’m not sure of the numbers).

I wonder how do they explain that?


2 posted on 06/19/2008 2:39:19 PM PDT by Eva (ue)
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To: blam

Rochester, NY...They’re building big condos right in the heart of the town for business people...but turn the corner...And it’s a slum and VERY scarey.


3 posted on 06/19/2008 2:39:20 PM PDT by Sacajaweau (I'm planting corn...Have to feed my car...)
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To: blam

That’s alright by me,as long as I can keep my little piece of the country.

Once the work day is over I flee the city and I’m glad to leave.As far as i’m concerned there’s nothing there except pain,High taxes and misery.


4 posted on 06/19/2008 2:41:05 PM PDT by puppypusher (The world is going to the dogs.)
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To: blam

Media hype. Downtowns are ‘popular’ in some cities, but gross population numbers will tell you that large urban core cities are not growing as much as smaller ex-urban areas.


5 posted on 06/19/2008 2:41:16 PM PDT by WOSG (http://no-bama.blogspot.com/ - co-bloggers wanted!)
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To: blam
I've not seen any evidence of migrations back to the city. Has anyone else?

"According to a poll for Reuters, about 10 per cent of Americans said they were considering moving closer to work while roughly the same percentage said they were thinking about getting a job closer to home." (article)

Blam, 'considering' and 'thinking about' constitute a stampede for today's urinalists, if it's something they favor. If it's something they don't favor, it'll never see print.

6 posted on 06/19/2008 2:42:02 PM PDT by polymuser (Those who believe in something eventually prevail over those who believe in nothing.)
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To: blam

Of course, the housing prices in the city are far, far lower than those in the ‘burbs, thereby making the savings on gas so worth it. (For libs, that’s a Kerryesque misinterpretation of reality.) I figure the payback will be in - say - about 500 years or so. Dream on, oh left-wing journalists.


7 posted on 06/19/2008 2:42:10 PM PDT by Da Coyote
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To: Eva

1. Gays

2. Cost of housing in Seattle makes it prohibitive to have both a house and kids.

radiohead (former Seattlelite)


8 posted on 06/19/2008 2:42:14 PM PDT by radiohead (God helps those who help themselves - pray for Iowans and donate to the Salvation Army.)
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To: blam

You won’t see any evidence of people migrating back to the cities, since most of the jobs moved out to the suburbs along with the people.


9 posted on 06/19/2008 2:42:37 PM PDT by Eva (ue)
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To: blam
this is truth to a degree in gen x and y yuppie areas

bodes poorly for conservatives

state loving young liberals flocking to cool areas where they can be activists like they were taught in school and expect the state to look out for them

their only pitfall are the goblins that await such delicious pickings on their perimeter

10 posted on 06/19/2008 2:43:29 PM PDT by wardaddy (if I could slap Obama will he fight back like a black man or bitch up like a metero white boy?)
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To: blam

Yeah, here in Atlanta several major projects and our notoriously bad traffic are creating a boom in intown living. Some of it very encouraging and I was amazed when I was in some areas recently that used to be just useless. Tearing out one of the worst housing projects certainly helped.


11 posted on 06/19/2008 2:44:06 PM PDT by doodad
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To: blam

I call it BS.


12 posted on 06/19/2008 2:44:45 PM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true.)
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To: blam

Lots of cities are building more condos within.
Wouldn’t call it a massive influx back. I don’t want to live
in the concrete jungle....want to go more rural if anything.


13 posted on 06/19/2008 2:44:55 PM PDT by tflabo (Truth or tyranny)
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To: blam
According to a poll for Reuters, about 10 per cent of Americans said they were considering moving closer to work while roughly the same percentage said they were thinking about getting a job closer to home.

Which means 80%+ are not. Do we have nothing but "green" PR agents in our "Journalist" organizations now? This story is so much absurd wishful thinking.

What did they do let the Summer Intern from the Journalist school write this? This story is so bad not even most college newspapers would run it. Note to Rotters. MOST jobs in the USA are no longer in the Urban areas. They too have moved to the suburbs. So "moving closer to work" does not necessarily mean moving into an Urban area.

F for the author for writing such drivel, F to the Editors for publishing this garbage.

14 posted on 06/19/2008 2:46:21 PM PDT by MNJohnnie (http://www.iraqvetsforcongress.com ---- Get involved, make a difference.)
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To: blam
Other than a few trendy downtown condo projects, I don't see a lot of people moving into cities. I hear people talk about how wonderful it is to have all the ammenities within walking distance and all the entertainment and I think "I'm supposed to give up my quiet suburban house for a place in the city to save a ten minute drive to some entertainment venue maybe once every other week? No thanks."

If I had my choice of housing, it would be further away from the city with a few acres of land.

15 posted on 06/19/2008 2:46:24 PM PDT by KarlInOhio (Whale oil: the renewable biofuel for the 21st century.)
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To: Eva

MoronMedia and Zogby poll have the credibility of ZERO.
It will take a lot more than high gas prices for any large no. of Americans to move back into the hellholes that are blue cities! Thanks to the lying Libs.


16 posted on 06/19/2008 2:46:33 PM PDT by iopscusa (El Vaquero. (SC Lowcountry Cowboy))
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To: Sacajaweau

That is like my neighborhood. houses range from $350,000 up to above a million and more. But go just a short distance and you are near the projects.


17 posted on 06/19/2008 2:46:42 PM PDT by mel
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To: blam

Nobody has moved anywhere in this town. Everybody is sitting tight while putting up ‘For Sale by Owner’ signs. Nobody buying, nobody selling. 100,000 population spread out over 50 mile radius.


18 posted on 06/19/2008 2:46:49 PM PDT by RightWhale (I will veto each and every beer)
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To: blam
Hell no!!! This is just some GANG-GREEN GovernMental EnvironMentalcase's wet dream!!! They are just orgasmic over these soaring prices which are making my rural home equity shrink like somebody forgot to "Sanforize*" it!!!

*"Sanforized" is an old process to keep one's clothing from shrinking in the wash. I'm not even sure it's still around... guess I'll have to Google that, too!!!

The only thing these self-annointed EnvironMentalists have ever accomplished is to make everything cost prohibitive!!!

19 posted on 06/19/2008 2:49:28 PM PDT by SierraWasp (No fool like an old fool! Juan McGore, the Republican McMaverick hates the media's challenging!!!)
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To: blam
I've not seen any evidence of migrations back to the city. Has anyone else?

No. Neither, apparently, has the story's author. The closest he comes to naming any basis in reality for this environmentalist fantasy is this:

According to a poll for Reuters, about 10 per cent of Americans said they were considering moving closer to work while roughly the same percentage said they were thinking about getting a job closer to home.

It's basically a piece of fiction, with no substantiation whatever.
20 posted on 06/19/2008 2:49:31 PM PDT by AnotherUnixGeek
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To: blam

“I’ve not seen any evidence of migrations back to the city. Has anyone else?”

....yes, but it depends on the neighborhood....when my daughter called me Sunday she mentioned that there had been an uptick in activity at her inside-the-beltway neighborhood in Maryland...she’s 7 miles from downtown Washington, DC....believe me, 14 miles a day roundtrip in that area ain’t bad....there’s plenty of people that do 100 and up, and I do mean up......around there, transportation costs can be second only to your house note in your monthly budget.


21 posted on 06/19/2008 2:50:31 PM PDT by STONEWALLS
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To: Eva

“I wonder how do they explain that?”

There are a lot of single/ no kids households out there. Those people like to live in urban cities.

This is a part of 2 Americas
Single / Urban / no kids / liberal / etc. America
Married / Suburban / kids / conservative America


22 posted on 06/19/2008 2:50:48 PM PDT by WOSG (http://no-bama.blogspot.com/ - co-bloggers wanted!)
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To: blam

Chicago.


23 posted on 06/19/2008 2:51:30 PM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: blam

I live in the heart of the city of San Diego.
More people are selling their homes going into condos.
In the downtown area, over 30 high rise condo bldgs have been built and more are under way, many up to 43 stories high. Over 30,000 have moved downtown recently.
They range from near million dollars a unit to 12 million a unit on up.

I am just up from downtown and condo bldgs also built in recent yrs and still going up. Most of these run from half a million to 4 million+ a unit
Many units are being sold before the bldgs are built.


24 posted on 06/19/2008 2:52:18 PM PDT by SoCalPol (Don't Blame Me - I Supported Duncan Hunter)
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To: iopscusa

The media is in a frenzy, trying to write a new meta narrative concerning the high price of oil. There was a front page article in the WSJ with a headline, saying that the high cost of fuel was resulting in the return of jobs to the US. Then when you read the article, it didn’t really say that at all. It did say that a manufacturer said that he would rethink sending any more jobs to China.


25 posted on 06/19/2008 2:53:30 PM PDT by Eva (ue)
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To: blam
He's a Brit living in a gentrified section of BROOKLYN!!! He knows NOTHING about America.

I was stuck in the Apple because of my job. Once I retired I moved to America! I'm now in the “ex-urbs” of a bustling town of 7,000 (when the college is in session)

26 posted on 06/19/2008 2:55:11 PM PDT by Roccus (The ruling class WILL have its way.)
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To: blam

Well, the article is from the UK, and they’re easily led Sheep, so if their Handlers tell them that life is better in the city, in a box, that’s where they’ll go.

It’s most likely closer to the Dole Office, or whatever they call it in the UK, LOL!

The “downtown” of many blue, mid-sized (200K or so) Midwest cities are decaying from within. (Think Madison, and then for an even better example, Milwaukee, WI.)


27 posted on 06/19/2008 2:56:06 PM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
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To: All

This is crap. “Let’s be green by moving to the cities and half million dollar hovels in high crime neighborhoods.” They wish.


28 posted on 06/19/2008 2:57:45 PM PDT by Luke21
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To: blam
American cities attract illegal aliens, slums, retired, and college grads. Suburbs attract families fleeing the cities. The growth of the former has outpaced the latter. I don't see a decrease in suburban population. But, I don't see any British journalists asking questions here either. It's a stupid made-up story from over the pond, especially the part about the green cities.
29 posted on 06/19/2008 3:02:42 PM PDT by LoneRangerMassachusetts
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To: blam

This is just sour grapes. This Brit is just sore about the last “mass migration” when all of the really able people left Europe for America.


30 posted on 06/19/2008 3:06:05 PM PDT by WorkingClassFilth (Don't cheer for Obama too hard - the krinton syndicate is moving back into the WH.)
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To: blam

You can buy a nice three bedroom Victorian in Detroit for $2,000, complete with crooked politicians, crumbling streets, thieving bureaucrats, burglars, rapists and a communist governor. Go for it, libs.


31 posted on 06/19/2008 3:07:54 PM PDT by sergeantdave (er the extra spears you made?)
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To: Eva

People who have already put down roots are less likely to move. Those who haven’t started families yet find it easier to relocate.


32 posted on 06/19/2008 3:09:18 PM PDT by kms61
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To: blam
"I've not seen any evidence of migrations back to the city. Has anyone else?"

There is a fair amount of it in Atlanta. It isn't new, it has been going on for at least ten years. Part of it is new condos and small houses in new mixed-use developments, and part of it is gentrification of old neighborhoods.

33 posted on 06/19/2008 3:11:19 PM PDT by magellan
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To: blam; wardaddy

Along the lakefront of Chicago, I know quite a few empty-nesters who migrated to the city, mostly for the amenities. This migration started over 10 years ago, before the current oil price increase.

Most of these folks hardly fit the demographics of Ohio or Madison, Wisconsin. The aforementioned couples were earning in excess of $250,000 back then so two-bedroom condos were not a big deal.

A weekend visit to some of the shops in Bucktown or along Mayor Daley’s neighborhood (between South Lake Shore Drive and South Michigan Ave.) reveals a surprising number of older Boomer couples.


34 posted on 06/19/2008 3:11:24 PM PDT by 12Gauge687 (Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice)
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To: LoneRangerMassachusetts

That’s true, but if enough unattached, but otherwise normal people move back to the cities, the quality of life will improve, which will in turn will bring back families.


35 posted on 06/19/2008 3:11:47 PM PDT by kms61
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To: blam

“...the millenials to rebel against their cul-de-sac upbringing. “

Oh the horror of living in a cul-de-sac! What am I doing to my kids! Probably scarring them for life having to play with all the other kids here, riding bikes, jumping on tramolines, begging to sleep over and running the 1/4 mile to the park.

To be fair, I probably lean more toward the greeny-weeny side personally which is why when I was offered the chance to become a ‘virtual worker’, I jumped at it. Working from home is great.....it allows me to hear the screams of agony from my kids as they suffer out front with all the other kids.

‘TEC’ : typical evil conservative.


36 posted on 06/19/2008 3:12:15 PM PDT by mad puppy (Never have I felt so politically radical and I swear I didn't move an inch.)
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To: kalee

well, we are considering it. Hubby is going to be working in Crystal City, and would really like to live somewhere near the Metrorail, even though we could afford much more further out of the DC area. He wants to actually see us during the week. Right now though, we are keeping all options open.
Gas prices aren’t the main deciding factor though...it’s commute time. Who knows, we will see how bad it is when we get there I guess. lol


37 posted on 06/19/2008 3:14:24 PM PDT by Cailleach
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To: blam

“Moving closer to work” is now seen as “moving into socialist cities”.


38 posted on 06/19/2008 3:17:46 PM PDT by CodeToad
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To: blam

New York City, the safest and richest of the big cities, has not seen its population increase. It was about 8m in the 1940’s. It’s about 8m today. Most of our other cities would not be considered cities in the European sense - they’re too spread out for efficient mass transit.


39 posted on 06/19/2008 3:18:09 PM PDT by Zhang Fei
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To: blam

Yes, it’s happening. And for those who choose to stay in the suburbs, the ghetto is coming out to join you - forced out of the city centers by rising property values. Antioch and Palmdale in California are two good examples.


40 posted on 06/19/2008 3:20:35 PM PDT by Mr. Jeeves ("One man's 'magic' is another man's engineering. 'Supernatural' is a null word." -- Robert Heinlein)
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To: blam

Philly, especially downtown (”Center City”) has been in the midst of a residential building boom for at least the past 5 years. SEPTA public transportation ridership is at its highest levels since the 1970’s.

High fuel costs will definitely change the way Americans think about living in urban areas.


41 posted on 06/19/2008 3:27:56 PM PDT by abercrombie_guy_38
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To: blam
There is a bit of truth to that for So. Cal.

In Southern California they built up the Inland Empire, Riverside and San Bernardino all the way out into the deserts. Now, few can afford to live their, due to the expensive commutes into Orange County and LA as so expensive. Not to mention the traffic.

People living in those areas are being beat like a drum over these fuel prices, and now all prices.

Those suburbs on the coastal plain, surrounding OC and LA, are much better off.

42 posted on 06/19/2008 3:33:49 PM PDT by dragnet2
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To: radiohead
2. Cost of housing in Seattle makes it prohibitive to have both a house and kids.

Add and a wife!

43 posted on 06/19/2008 3:35:08 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: dragnet2
Er... In Southern California they built up the Inland Empire, Riverside and San Bernardino all the way out into the deserts. Now, few can afford to live there, due to the expensive commutes into Orange County and LA as so expensive. Not to mention the traffic.

People living in those areas are being beat like a drum over these fuel prices, and now all prices.

Those suburbs on the coastal plain, surrounding OC and LA, are much better off.

I really feel for those that bought way inland in the past 15 years or so. Most of those that did it, just wanted an affordable home. If these fuel prices continue, they'll be left twisting in the wind.

44 posted on 06/19/2008 3:38:47 PM PDT by dragnet2
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To: Mr. Jeeves

“Yes, it’s happening. And for those who choose to stay in the suburbs, the ghetto is coming out to join you”

That’s exactly what’s happened in the suburbs south of Boston.


45 posted on 06/19/2008 3:40:13 PM PDT by Andy'smom
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To: blam
Once Plazas started to be built in the suburbs, it was all over. EVERYONE shopped downtown when I was a kid....AND RODE THE BUS to get there.

Now, everything necessary for survival is within a two mile radius....bank, stores, restaurant, post office, Kmart, super market and there's absolutely nothing downtown for the average suburbian.

46 posted on 06/19/2008 3:40:33 PM PDT by Sacajaweau (I'm planting corn...Have to feed my car...)
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To: Diana in Wisconsin

Sort of reminds me of DT Saint Paul in Minnesota. The DT area’s become a money pit for the better part of 2 decades save for the hockey arena.


47 posted on 06/19/2008 3:40:48 PM PDT by TypeZoNegative (Barak Obama: An American African, Not An African-American. (There is a Difference.))
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To: TypeZoNegative

My brother in law and his family are moving from Minneapolis to Beaver Dam, WI. His wife is a “Hospital Cost Cutter” and she’s been hired at the hospital in BD.

They are VERY happy to get out of there, and though they’re much more liberal than I am, Beaver Dam is going to seem like Mayberry, RFD to them, LOL!


48 posted on 06/19/2008 3:45:42 PM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
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To: SoCalPol
Many units arewere being sold before the bldgs are were built.
49 posted on 06/19/2008 4:00:34 PM PDT by glorgau
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To: dragnet2
Er... In Southern California they built up the Inland Empire, Riverside and San Bernardino all the way out into the deserts. Now, few can afford to live there, due to the expensive commutes into Orange County and LA as so expensive. Not to mention the traffic.

Perhaps jobs will come to them. Why is it necessary for information workers to physically commute long distances to central cities?

50 posted on 06/19/2008 4:02:25 PM PDT by Paleo Conservative (1984 was supposed to be a warning not an instruction manual!)
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