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Rainbows displace Boy Scouts
Casper Star Tribune ^ | 6/24/08 | CHRIS MERRILL

Posted on 06/24/2008 10:29:33 AM PDT by girlangler

By CHRIS MERRILL Star-Tribune environment reporter Tuesday, June 24, 2008 > LANDER -- Since Rainbow Family participants have chosen to stay put at Big Sandy in Wyoming's Wind River Mountains, leaders with the Boy Scouts of America have decided to alter plans for a major service project that had been scheduled to take place in the same general area. > > Leaders with the Boy Scouts' Order of the Arrow have decided to cancel a long-planned forest restoration project near Dutch Joe Guard Station in the Wind Rivers, said Mary Cernicek, spokeswoman with the Bridger-Teton National Forest. > > The U.S. Forest Service was scrambling Monday to come up with a similar project in a different location in the Bridger-Teton, to serve as a substitute for the Scouts when they come July 26 through Aug. 2. > > ''We're heartbroken, but we're committed to giving the Boy Scouts a good experience and providing them with the education and leadership skills they're seeking,'' Cernicek said. > > About 1,000 Scouts from throughout the United States are scheduled to come to the Cowboy State in the latter half of July as part of a five-week project in five different national forests -- the largest national service project for the Boy Scouts since World War II, according to Ed Stewart, spokesman Boy Scouts of America in Dallas. > > The Order of the Arrow, which is the Boy Scouts' national honor society, anticipates 5,000 or so participants will provide more than a combined 250,000 hours of service this summer helping to restore portions of national forests in Missouri, Utah, Virginia, California and Wyoming, according Stewart. > > ''The Scouts have been committed for a long time with this particular project,'' Stewart said. ''Hundreds of these Scouts are raring to go. They're on their way to Virginia now, and that'll be forest number three. These are teenagers who can answer, 'What did you do this summer?' with the response that they went to five locations throughout the country and helped restore some national (forests).'' > > Representatives of the Bridger-Teton and the Scouts were scheduled to meet via teleconference late Monday to discuss their options, Cernicek said before the meeting. > > ''They'll still be doing a project in the Bridger-Teton, just not at Dutch Joe,'' she said. ''There will still be about 1,000 Scouts -- 700 on Teton Pass, and 150 at Goosewing Guard Station near the Gros Ventre Wilderness boundary.'' > > The Scouts will construct about 8,000 feet of trail on Teton Pass, and will remove a 10-foot-high exclusion fence at Goosewing. They had planned to remove about a quarter mile of wooden and sheep wire fence near Dutch Joe Guard Station, as well. > > The Rainbow Family has chosen that same general area for its annual national Rainbow Gathering of Living Light, a counterculture celebration of peace, love and a gentle existence. > > Last week Mark Rey, the federal undersecretary who oversees the U.S. Forest Service, came to Pinedale from Washington, D.C., to meet with Rainbow Family participants and urge them to move their gathering to a different location so it wouldn't conflict with the Boy Scouts' project. > > Although the Rainbow event reaches its peak attendance July 4, and a mass exodus generally ensues the following day, all parties have agreed that a Rainbow cleanup crew will still be hard at work by the time the Boy Scouts are scheduled to begin their project at the end of July. > > The Rainbows who were already on site conferred about Rey's request, but decided it was already too late to shut down and clean up the Dutch Joe area, and choose another location to then reconstruct kitchens, latrines and water supplies before a potential 25,000 people arrived. > > Whose fault? > > Sue Bradford of Missoula, Mont., who has been attending Rainbow gatherings since 1992, said Rainbow participants notified the Forest Service of the location they'd decided on, and were not told it was a ''bad'' location until several days later, after it was already too late. > > ''I would hate to see the Boy Scouts have to move, but at this stage in the game the gathering starts to take on a life of its own,'' Bradford said. ''I used to be an Explorer Scout and a Girl Scout. A lot of people at the gathering were Boy Scouts. I think a lot of people there would have shared these concerns, if only they'd known sooner.'' > > There are already an estimated 1,100 campers set up in the area, and by the time the federal agency notified the Rainbow Family of the conflict, the group had already laid a mile of water pipe, she said. To start over would set the effort back at least 10 days, and the new site would be ill-prepared to handle the impacts of the sudden 10,000 to 20,000 participants expected just before July 4. > > ''I would expect that probably a majority of people out there would not have wanted to dislocate the Boy Scouts,'' she said. > > Garrick Beck of Santa Fe, N.M., who has attended almost all of the Rainbow gatherings since 1972, took part in several conference calls among the Forest Service, the Boy Scouts of America and the Rainbows during the past week, he said. > > He said he's one of many Rainbow participants who were in favor of changing the location once they heard of the Boy Scout conflict, but he wasn't on site when the decision was made to stay. > > ''It's a mess, and it's unfortunate, and there's plenty of blame to go around,'' Beck said. ''But this never would have happened, or could have happened, if the Forest Service at the very beginning had said, 'No, this is not a workable site.'" > > It wasn't until after more than 200 people had gathered at the site and begun digging in kitchens and other infrastructure that the Forest Service told them, "This is a real problem,'' he said. > > Rainbow participants had three or four meetings with Forest Service representatives after choosing the Big Sandy site, before the officials said anything about the Boy Scout conflict, he said. > > ''We never would have gotten in that position if the Forest Service had indicated from the get-go that this was not a workable site,'' Beck said. > > But District Ranger Tom Peters, the local official who has been attempting to work with the gathering participants, said the Rainbows' claims of ignorance about the Boy Scout conflict are not representative of what actually happened in the lead-up to their choice of location. > > ''The first time I was given an opportunity to talk to them wasn't all that long ago, and from the get-go I told them there was a conflict with the Scouts,'' Peters said. > > The first time Peters heard that the Rainbows had chosen the Big Sandy area was June 5, he said, when about six Rainbow participants came to his office unannounced. During that first meeting he told them there was a conflict with Scouts, he said, ''And I committed to giving them a written document for all the reasons Big Sandy was not a good site, which I did Monday the 9th of June.'' > > The Forest Service provided the Rainbow participants -- at the Rainbows' request -- with four sites that would have been suitable for the event at the end of March, Peters said, and his understanding was that they'd chose from among the four sites. > > The Rainbow Family instead chose Big Sandy, which was not on the list, he said. > > Environment reporter Chris Merrill can be reached at chris.merrill@trib.com or at (307) 267-6722. > > http://www.jacksonholestartrib.com/articles/2008/06/24/news/wyoming/doc4860f 76bb014d334583272.txt


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Government; News/Current Events; US: Wyoming
KEYWORDS: boyscouts; bsa; conservation; environment; forest; paragraphs; rainbowfamily; summercamp
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Okay, this is a major outrage!!!

A bunch of hippies, claiming to be environmentalists, saving the earth, are going into public "fragile" land and building trences, water lines, and latrines, for 20,000 people -- and in the process stop a major project by Boy Scouts to help these forests.

Especially when the USFS is always claiming to be so strapped for money they are cutting back services, wildlife management programs on these lands.

If this group "The Rainbows," were wanting to build a gas or oil pipeline there the environmental groups would be raising *****

Something ain't right with this picture.Grrrrrrrrrrr

1 posted on 06/24/2008 10:29:33 AM PDT by girlangler
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To: girlangler

I’m sure this article is about something outrageous but it’s unreadable in it’s present form. Please reformat it.


2 posted on 06/24/2008 10:31:36 AM PDT by jalisco555 ("My 80% friend is not my 20% enemy" - Ronald Reagan)
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To: girlangler

“Something ain’t right with this picture.”

Maybe it’s the lack of paragraphs...


3 posted on 06/24/2008 10:32:27 AM PDT by PetroniusMaximus
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To: girlangler

Now they’ll NEVER get the hippie-stink out of the forest....


4 posted on 06/24/2008 10:32:42 AM PDT by WayneS (What the hell is wrong with these people?)
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To: girlangler

All I see is a wall of text...


5 posted on 06/24/2008 10:33:57 AM PDT by Doohickey (SSN: One ship, one crew, one screw.)
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To: Doohickey
All I see is a wall of text...

Not to be confused with Phil Specter and the "Wall of Sound."

6 posted on 06/24/2008 10:35:04 AM PDT by TexasNative2000 (Is this tagline governed by McCain-Feingold?)
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To: girlangler

Have it been to a gathering in years, but it was a great time a couple of decades ago. Always a bad element that gets drawn in with these groups, but in my time it was pretty small.

No reasons the Scouts and the Gathering can’t get along.


7 posted on 06/24/2008 10:36:02 AM PDT by Natchez Hawk (This is Sammy Israel III filling in for DB Cooper who will be returning next week,)
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To: girlangler

Okay, after I gritted my teeth, squinted and went through the story, I’m not seeing where anyone did anything uncivilized.


8 posted on 06/24/2008 10:37:47 AM PDT by Doohickey (SSN: One ship, one crew, one screw.)
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To: wintertime
ping for later.

By the way, I am the mother of an Eagle Scout. I am ***sooooo*** proud of him!

9 posted on 06/24/2008 10:38:08 AM PDT by wintertime (Quick find the RAID!)
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To: WayneS
They were here in the early 80s.

They are south of Lander on South Pass.

They would go into a grocery store and while some girl types started taking off their clothes to distract the store employees, the guy types would haul groceries out the back door to their hippy vans.

10 posted on 06/24/2008 10:38:24 AM PDT by Dan(9698)
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To: girlangler

There’s been so many, songs about rainbows...


11 posted on 06/24/2008 10:38:27 AM PDT by Clemenza (No Comment)
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To: girlangler

Back in my leftist, socialist, hippy, college days, I used to attend these gatherings. I recall meeting the most stoned dog on the face of the planet. I recall a guy selling tatoo services for food. I recall a lot of nudity that never should have been exposed. And finally, I recall the rainbows absolutely trashing the surrounding environment like a horde of pot-smoking, free-rutting locusts every time they descended on a pristine natural area.

Fortunately, as my daughter says, I used to be a hippy but I got better. Unfortunately, the rainbows just keep trucking.


12 posted on 06/24/2008 10:39:24 AM PDT by FateAmenableToChange
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To: jalisco555

I am unable to link to the article. I keep getting an error page


13 posted on 06/24/2008 10:40:27 AM PDT by Southerngurl
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To: girlangler
Owwwww!


14 posted on 06/24/2008 10:44:03 AM PDT by ladtx ( "Never miss a good chance to shut up." - - Will Rogers)
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To: girlangler
Random paragraphing added for readability: By CHRIS MERRILL Star-Tribune environment reporter Tuesday, June 24, 2008 >

LANDER -- Since Rainbow Family participants have chosen to stay put at Big Sandy in Wyoming's Wind River Mountains, leaders with the Boy Scouts of America have decided to alter plans for a major service project that had been scheduled to take place in the same general area.

> > Leaders with the Boy Scouts' Order of the Arrow have decided to cancel a long-planned forest restoration project near Dutch Joe Guard Station in the Wind Rivers, said Mary Cernicek, spokeswoman with the Bridger-Teton National Forest. > > The U.S. Forest Service was scrambling Monday to come up with a similar project in a different location in the Bridger-Teton, to serve as a substitute for the Scouts when they come July 26 through Aug. 2. > >

''We're heartbroken, but we're committed to giving the Boy Scouts a good experience and providing them with the education and leadership skills they're seeking,'' Cernicek said. > > About 1,000 Scouts from throughout the United States are scheduled to come to the Cowboy State in the latter half of July as part of a five-week project in five different national forests -- the largest national service project for the Boy Scouts since World War II, according to Ed Stewart, spokesman Boy Scouts of America in Dallas. > > The Order of the Arrow, which is the Boy Scouts' national honor society, anticipates 5,000 or so participants will provide more than a combined 250,000 hours of service this summer helping to restore portions of national forests in Missouri, Utah, Virginia, California and Wyoming, according Stewart. > >

''The Scouts have been committed for a long time with this particular project,'' Stewart said. ''Hundreds of these Scouts are raring to go. They're on their way to Virginia now, and that'll be forest number three. These are teenagers who can answer, 'What did you do this summer?' with the response that they went to five locations throughout the country and helped restore some national (forests).'' > > Representatives of the Bridger-Teton and the Scouts were scheduled to meet via teleconference late Monday to discuss their options, Cernicek said before the meeting. > > ''They'll still be doing a project in the Bridger-Teton, just not at Dutch Joe,'' she said. ''There will still be about 1,000 Scouts -- 700 on Teton Pass, and 150 at Goosewing Guard Station near the Gros Ventre Wilderness boundary.'' > >

The Scouts will construct about 8,000 feet of trail on Teton Pass, and will remove a 10-foot-high exclusion fence at Goosewing. They had planned to remove about a quarter mile of wooden and sheep wire fence near Dutch Joe Guard Station, as well. > >

The Rainbow Family has chosen that same general area for its annual national Rainbow Gathering of Living Light, a counterculture celebration of peace, love and a gentle existence. > > Last week Mark Rey, the federal undersecretary who oversees the U.S. Forest Service, came to Pinedale from Washington, D.C., to meet with Rainbow Family participants and urge them to move their gathering to a different location so it wouldn't conflict with the Boy Scouts' project. > > Although the Rainbow event reaches its peak attendance July 4, and a mass exodus generally ensues the following day, all parties have agreed that a Rainbow cleanup crew will still be hard at work by the time the Boy Scouts are scheduled to begin their project at the end of July. > >

The Rainbows who were already on site conferred about Rey's request, but decided it was already too late to shut down and clean up the Dutch Joe area, and choose another location to then reconstruct kitchens, latrines and water supplies before a potential 25,000 people arrived. > > Whose fault? > > Sue Bradford of Missoula, Mont., who has been attending Rainbow gatherings since 1992, said Rainbow participants notified the Forest Service of the location they'd decided on, and were not told it was a ''bad'' location until several days later, after it was already too late. > > ''I would hate to see the Boy Scouts have to move, but at this stage in the game the gathering starts to take on a life of its own,'' Bradford said. ''I used to be an Explorer Scout and a Girl Scout. A lot of people at the gathering were Boy Scouts. I think a lot of people there would have shared these concerns, if only they'd known sooner.'' > >

There are already an estimated 1,100 campers set up in the area, and by the time the federal agency notified the Rainbow Family of the conflict, the group had already laid a mile of water pipe, she said. To start over would set the effort back at least 10 days, and the new site would be ill-prepared to handle the impacts of the sudden 10,000 to 20,000 participants expected just before July 4. > > ''I would expect that probably a majority of people out there would not have wanted to dislocate the Boy Scouts,'' she said. > >

Garrick Beck of Santa Fe, N.M., who has attended almost all of the Rainbow gatherings since 1972, took part in several conference calls among the Forest Service, the Boy Scouts of America and the Rainbows during the past week, he said. > > He said he's one of many Rainbow participants who were in favor of changing the location once they heard of the Boy Scout conflict, but he wasn't on site when the decision was made to stay. > > ''It's a mess, and it's unfortunate, and there's plenty of blame to go around,'' Beck said. ''But this never would have happened, or could have happened, if the Forest Service at the very beginning had said, 'No, this is not a workable site.'" > > It wasn't until after more than 200 people had gathered at the site and begun digging in kitchens and other infrastructure that the Forest Service told them, "This is a real problem,'' he said. > >

Rainbow participants had three or four meetings with Forest Service representatives after choosing the Big Sandy site, before the officials said anything about the Boy Scout conflict, he said. > > ''We never would have gotten in that position if the Forest Service had indicated from the get-go that this was not a workable site,'' Beck said. > >

But District Ranger Tom Peters, the local official who has been attempting to work with the gathering participants, said the Rainbows' claims of ignorance about the Boy Scout conflict are not representative of what actually happened in the lead-up to their choice of location. > > ''The first time I was given an opportunity to talk to them wasn't all that long ago, and from the get-go I told them there was a conflict with the Scouts,'' Peters said. > >

The first time Peters heard that the Rainbows had chosen the Big Sandy area was June 5, he said, when about six Rainbow participants came to his office unannounced. During that first meeting he told them there was a conflict with Scouts, he said, ''And I committed to giving them a written document for all the reasons Big Sandy was not a good site, which I did Monday the 9th of June.'' > >

The Forest Service provided the Rainbow participants -- at the Rainbows' request -- with four sites that would have been suitable for the event at the end of March, Peters said, and his understanding was that they'd chose from among the four sites. > >

The Rainbow Family instead chose Big Sandy, which was not on the list, he said. > > Environment reporter Chris Merrill can be reached at chris.merrill@trib.com or at (307) 267-6722. > > http://www.jacksonholestartrib.com/articles/2008/06/24/news/wyoming/doc4860f 76bb014d334583272.txt

15 posted on 06/24/2008 10:44:34 AM PDT by FateAmenableToChange
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To: girlangler

Seems FR crashed the Casper Star Tribune website. Even domain http://www.jacksonholestartrib.com/ won’t come up


16 posted on 06/24/2008 10:44:47 AM PDT by Domandred (McCain's 'R' is a typo that has never been corrected)
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To: Natchez Hawk

LANDER — Since Rainbow Family participants have chosen to stay put at Big Sandy in Wyoming’s Wind River Mountains, leaders with the Boy Scouts of America have decided to alter plans for a major service project that had
been scheduled to take place in the same general area.

Leaders with the Boy Scouts’ Order of the Arrow have decided to cancel a long-planned forest restoration project near Dutch Joe Guard Station in the Wind Rivers, said Mary Cernicek, spokeswoman with the Bridger-Teton
National Forest.
>
The U.S. Forest Service was scrambling Monday to come up with a similar project in a different location in the Bridger-Teton, to serve as a substitute for the Scouts when they come July 26 through Aug. 2.
>
‘’We’re heartbroken, but we’re committed to giving the Boy Scouts a good experience and providing them with the education and leadership skills they’re seeking,’’ Cernicek said.
>
About 1,000 Scouts from throughout the United States are scheduled to come to the Cowboy State in the latter half of July as part of a five-week project in five different national forests — the largest national service project for the Boy Scouts since World War II, according to Ed Stewart, spokesman Boy Scouts of America in Dallas.
>
The Order of the Arrow, which is the Boy Scouts’ national honor society,anticipates 5,000 or so participants will provide more than a combined 250,000 hours of service this summer helping to restore portions of national forests in Missouri, Utah, Virginia, California and Wyoming, according Stewart.
>
‘’The Scouts have been committed for a long time with this particular project,’’ Stewart said. ‘’Hundreds of these Scouts are raring to go. They’re on their way to Virginia now, and that’ll be forest number three.

These are teenagers who can answer, ‘What did you do this summer?’ with the response that they went to five locations throughout the country and helped restore some national (forests).’’
>
Representatives of the Bridger-Teton and the Scouts were scheduled to meet via teleconference late Monday to discuss their options, Cernicek said before the meeting.
>
‘’They’ll still be doing a project in the Bridger-Teton, just not at Dutch Joe,’’ she said. ‘’There will still be about 1,000 Scouts — 700 on Teton Pass, and 150 at Goosewing Guard Station near the Gros Ventre
Wilderness boundary.’’
>
The Scouts will construct about 8,000 feet of trail on Teton Pass, and will remove a 10-foot-high exclusion fence at Goosewing. They had planned to remove about a quarter mile of wooden and sheep wire fence near Dutch Joe Guard Station, as well.
>
> The Rainbow Family has chosen that same general area for its annual national Rainbow Gathering of Living Light, a counterculture celebration of peace, love and a gentle existence.
>
> Last week Mark Rey, the federal undersecretary who oversees the U.S. Forest Service, came to Pinedale from Washington, D.C., to meet with Rainbow Family participants and urge them to move their gathering to a different location so it wouldn’t conflict with the Boy Scouts’ project.
>
> Although the Rainbow event reaches its peak attendance July 4, and a mass exodus generally ensues the following day, all parties have agreed that a Rainbow cleanup crew will still be hard at work by the time the Boy Scouts
are scheduled to begin their project at the end of July.
>
> The Rainbows who were already on site conferred about Rey’s request, but decided it was already too late to shut down and clean up the Dutch Joe area, and choose another location to then reconstruct kitchens, latrines
and water supplies before a potential 25,000 people arrived.
>
> Whose fault?
>
> Sue Bradford of Missoula, Mont., who has been attending Rainbow gatherings since 1992, said Rainbow participants notified the Forest Service of the location they’d decided on, and were not told it was a ‘’bad’’ location until several days later, after it was already too late.
>
> ‘’I would hate to see the Boy Scouts have to move, but at this stage in the game the gathering starts to take on a life of its own,’’ Bradford said. ‘’I used to be an Explorer Scout and a Girl Scout. A lot of people at
the gathering were Boy Scouts. I think a lot of people there would have shared these concerns, if only they’d known sooner.’’
>
> There are already an estimated 1,100 campers set up in the area, and by the time the federal agency notified the Rainbow Family of the conflict, the group had already laid a mile of water pipe, she said. To start over would set the effort back at least 10 days, and the new site would be
ill-prepared to handle the impacts of the sudden 10,000 to 20,000 participants expected just before July 4.
>
> ‘’I would expect that probably a majority of people out there would not have wanted to dislocate the Boy Scouts,’’ she said.
>
> Garrick Beck of Santa Fe, N.M., who has attended almost all of the Rainbow gatherings since 1972, took part in several conference calls among the Forest Service, the Boy Scouts of America and the Rainbows during the past week, he said.
>
> He said he’s one of many Rainbow participants who were in favor of changing the location once they heard of the Boy Scout conflict, but he wasn’t on site when the decision was made to stay.
>
> ‘’It’s a mess, and it’s unfortunate, and there’s plenty of blame to go around,’’ Beck said. ‘’But this never would have happened, or could have happened, if the Forest Service at the very beginning had said, ‘No, this
is not a workable site.’”
>
> It wasn’t until after more than 200 people had gathered at the site and begun digging in kitchens and other infrastructure that the Forest Service told them, “This is a real problem,’’ he said.
>
> Rainbow participants had three or four meetings with Forest Service representatives after choosing the Big Sandy site, before the officials said anything about the Boy Scout conflict, he said.
>
> ‘’We never would have gotten in that position if the Forest Service had indicated from the get-go that this was not a workable site,’’ Beck said.
>
> But District Ranger Tom Peters, the local official who has been attempting to work with the gathering participants, said the Rainbows’ claims of ignorance about the Boy Scout conflict are not representative of
what actually happened in the lead-up to their choice of location.
>
> ‘’The first time I was given an opportunity to talk to them wasn’t all that long ago, and from the get-go I told them there was a conflict with the Scouts,’’ Peters said.
>
> The first time Peters heard that the Rainbows had chosen the Big Sandy area was June 5, he said, when about six Rainbow participants came to his office unannounced. During that first meeting he told them there was a
conflict with Scouts, he said, ‘’And I committed to giving them a written document for all the reasons Big Sandy was not a good site, which I did Monday the 9th of June.’’
>
> The Forest Service provided the Rainbow participants — at the Rainbows’ request — with four sites that would have been suitable for the event at the end of March, Peters said, and his understanding was that they’d chose
from among the four sites.
>
> The Rainbow Family instead chose Big Sandy, which was not on the list, he said.
>
> Environment reporter Chris Merrill can be reached at
chris.merrill@trib.com or at (307) 267-6722.
>
>
http://www.jacksonholestartrib.com/articles/2008/06/24/news/wyoming/doc4860f
76bb014d334583272.txt


17 posted on 06/24/2008 10:44:55 AM PDT by girlangler (Fish Fear Me)
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To: girlangler

By CHRIS MERRILL Star-Tribune environment reporter Tuesday, June 24, 2008

LANDER — Since Rainbow Family participants have chosen to stay put at Big Sandy in Wyoming’s Wind River Mountains, leaders with the Boy Scouts of America have decided to alter plans for a major service project that had been scheduled to take place in the same general area. Leaders with the Boy Scouts’ Order of the Arrow have decided to cancel a long-planned forest restoration project near Dutch Joe Guard Station in the Wind Rivers, said Mary Cernicek, spokeswoman with the Bridger-Teton National Forest. The U.S. Forest Service was scrambling Monday to come up with a similar project in a different location in the Bridger-Teton, to serve as a substitute for the Scouts when they come July 26 through Aug. 2.

‘’We’re heartbroken, but we’re committed to giving the Boy Scouts a good experience and providing them with the education and leadership skills they’re seeking,’’ Cernicek said.

About 1,000 Scouts from throughout the United States are scheduled to come to the Cowboy State in the latter half of July as part of a five-week project in five different national forests — the largest national service project for the Boy Scouts since World War II, according to Ed Stewart, spokesman Boy Scouts of America in Dallas. The Order of the Arrow, which is the Boy Scouts’ national honor society, anticipates 5,000 or so participants will provide more than a combined 250,000 hours of service this summer helping to restore portions of national forests in Missouri, Utah, Virginia, California and Wyoming, according Stewart.

‘’The Scouts have been committed for a long time with this particular project,’’ Stewart said. ‘’Hundreds of these Scouts are raring to go. They’re on their way to Virginia now, and that’ll be forest number three. These are teenagers who can answer, ‘What did you do this summer?’ with the response that they went to five locations throughout the country and helped restore some national (forests).’’

Representatives of the Bridger-Teton and the Scouts were scheduled to meet via teleconference late Monday to discuss their options, Cernicek said before the meeting. ‘’They’ll still be doing a project in the Bridger-Teton, just not at Dutch Joe,’’ she said. ‘’There will still be about 1,000 Scouts — 700 on Teton Pass, and 150 at Goosewing Guard Station near the Gros Ventre Wilderness boundary.’’

The Scouts will construct about 8,000 feet of trail on Teton Pass, and will remove a 10-foot-high exclusion fence at Goosewing. They had planned to remove about a quarter mile of wooden and sheep wire fence near Dutch Joe Guard Station, as well.

The Rainbow Family has chosen that same general area for its annual national Rainbow Gathering of Living Light, a counterculture celebration of peace, love and a gentle existence. Last week Mark Rey, the federal undersecretary who oversees the U.S. Forest Service, came to Pinedale from Washington, D.C., to meet with Rainbow Family participants and urge them to move their gathering to a different location so it wouldn’t conflict with the Boy Scouts’ project.

Although the Rainbow event reaches its peak attendance July 4, and a mass exodus generally ensues the following day, all parties have agreed that a Rainbow cleanup crew will still be hard at work by the time the Boy Scouts are scheduled to begin their project at the end of July. The Rainbows who were already on site conferred about Rey’s request, but decided it was already too late to shut down and clean up the Dutch Joe area, and choose another location to then reconstruct kitchens, latrines and water supplies before a potential 25,000 people arrived.

Whose fault?

Sue Bradford of Missoula, Mont., who has been attending Rainbow gatherings since 1992, said Rainbow participants notified the Forest Service of the location they’d decided on, and were not told it was a ‘’bad’’ location until several days later, after it was already too late.

‘’I would hate to see the Boy Scouts have to move, but at this stage in the game the gathering starts to take on a life of its own,’’ Bradford said. ‘’I used to be an Explorer Scout and a Girl Scout. A lot of people at the gathering were Boy Scouts. I think a lot of people there would have shared these concerns, if only they’d known sooner.’’

There are already an estimated 1,100 campers set up in the area, and by the time the federal agency notified the Rainbow Family of the conflict, the group had already laid a mile of water pipe, she said. To start over would set the effort back at least 10 days, and the new site would be ill-prepared to handle the impacts of the sudden 10,000 to 20,000 participants expected just before July 4.

‘’I would expect that probably a majority of people out there would not have wanted to dislocate the Boy Scouts,’’ she said.

Garrick Beck of Santa Fe, N.M., who has attended almost all of the Rainbow gatherings since 1972, took part in several conference calls among the Forest Service, the Boy Scouts of America and the Rainbows during the past week, he said.

He said he’s one of many Rainbow participants who were in favor of changing the location once they heard of the Boy Scout conflict, but he wasn’t on site when the decision was made to stay.

‘’It’s a mess, and it’s unfortunate, and there’s plenty of blame to go around,’’ Beck said. ‘’But this never would have happened, or could have happened, if the Forest Service at the very beginning had said, ‘No, this is not a workable site.’”

It wasn’t until after more than 200 people had gathered at the site and begun digging in kitchens and other infrastructure that the Forest Service told them, “This is a real problem,’’ he said.

Rainbow participants had three or four meetings with Forest Service representatives after choosing the Big Sandy site, before the officials said anything about the Boy Scout conflict, he said.

‘’We never would have gotten in that position if the Forest Service had indicated from the get-go that this was not a workable site,’’ Beck said.

But District Ranger Tom Peters, the local official who has been attempting to work with the gathering participants, said the Rainbows’ claims of ignorance about the Boy Scout conflict are not representative of what actually happened in the lead-up to their choice of location.

‘’The first time I was given an opportunity to talk to them wasn’t all that long ago, and from the get-go I told them there was a conflict with the Scouts,’’ Peters said.

The first time Peters heard that the Rainbows had chosen the Big Sandy area was June 5, he said, when about six Rainbow participants came to his office unannounced. During that first meeting he told them there was a conflict with Scouts, he said, ‘’And I committed to giving them a written document for all the reasons Big Sandy was not a good site, which I did Monday the 9th of June.’’

The Forest Service provided the Rainbow participants — at the Rainbows’ request — with four sites that would have been suitable for the event at the end of March, Peters said, and his understanding was that they’d chose from among the four sites.

The Rainbow Family instead chose Big Sandy, which was not on the list, he said.

Environment reporter Chris Merrill can be reached at chris.merrill@trib.com or at (307) 267-6722.

http://www.jacksonholestartrib.com/articles/2008/06/24/news/wyoming/doc4860f 76bb014d334583272.txt


18 posted on 06/24/2008 10:48:34 AM PDT by RonF
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To: Doohickey
"Although the Rainbow event reaches its peak attendance July 4, and a mass exodus generally ensues the following day, all parties have agreed that a Rainbow cleanup crew will still be hard at work by the time the Boy Scouts are scheduled to begin their project at the end of July."

From July 5 to July 31 is almost 4 weeks. 4 weeks to clean up after a bunch of environmentalists isn't enough time? I would think they would clean up after themselves before they left, like the Boy Scouts do.

"The Forest Service provided the Rainbow participants -- at the Rainbows' request -- with four sites that would have been suitable for the event at the end of March, Peters said, and his understanding was that they'd chose from among the four sites. The Rainbow Family instead chose Big Sandy, which was not on the list, he said."

Pick a site that wasn't offered and then claim that the Forest Service didn't give them enough notice that there was a conflict?

At least these self-absorbed, disrespectful weenies are consistently self-absorbed and disrespectful.

Obama worshippers, no doubt.

19 posted on 06/24/2008 10:48:41 AM PDT by GourmetDan (Eccl 10:2 - The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of the fool to the left.)
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To: girlangler

a big c.f.


20 posted on 06/24/2008 10:50:00 AM PDT by Natchez Hawk (This is Sammy Israel III filling in for DB Cooper who will be returning next week,)
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To: Southerngurl
I am unable to link to the article. I keep getting an error page

Ditto.

21 posted on 06/24/2008 10:51:45 AM PDT by jalisco555 ("My 80% friend is not my 20% enemy" - Ronald Reagan)
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To: girlangler

Here’s what everyones looking for:

http://www.jacksonholestartrib.com/articles/2008/06/24/news/wyoming/doc4860f76bb014d334583272.txt

There was an added space in the URL


22 posted on 06/24/2008 10:52:29 AM PDT by The Tin Foil Hat
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To: All; george76; SJackson; jazusamo; Diana in Wisconsin; Grammy

I apologize for posting this in this form. I did the same thing accidentally a few weeks ago and several freepers were nice enough to show me how to straighten it up.

I have reposted it.

My point with posting this is the Rainbows are bringing in 25,000 people at one time, laying pipes, destroying no telling how much fawna and flora to build infrastructure for an entire city.

What do you think environmentalists would say if an Oil or gas company did this?

Be sure to read the sentence where the USFS guy said he gave the Rainbows plenty of time to reconsider the location.

So, we have a virtual “city” of people (I’d be willing to bet most of which claim to love the Mother Earth and want to save it) preventing the Boy Scouts from going in there and Really doing something beneficial for the forest.

Am I the only one that sees a double standard here?

What really ticked me off is right before posting this I just read about environmentalists suing to stop a gas pipeline in another public land out west that would impact a couple of square miles.


23 posted on 06/24/2008 10:54:01 AM PDT by girlangler (Fish Fear Me)
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To: girlangler
Something ain't right with this picture.Grrrrrrrrrrr

Judging from the story it sounds like the hippies had the reservation first and that the Forest Service asked them to change their plans to accomodate the Scouts. And since people had already started showing up for their event, the hippies decided they couldn't change as such late date. Sorry, Scouts. The hippies have dibs on the site.

24 posted on 06/24/2008 10:56:36 AM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: Non-Sequitur

Is it redundant to call hippies “dirty, smelly hippies?”


25 posted on 06/24/2008 11:03:13 AM PDT by quark
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To: Non-Sequitur
The Forest Service provided the Rainbow participants -- at the Rainbows' request -- with four sites that would have been suitable for the event at the end of March, Peters said, and his understanding was that they'd chose from among the four sites. The Rainbow Family instead chose Big Sandy, which was not on the list, he said.

Sounds more like the Rainbow folks did some claim-jumping.

26 posted on 06/24/2008 11:04:13 AM PDT by Jonah Hex ("Never underestimate the hungover side of the Force.")
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To: quark
I haven't seen this bunch so I wouldn't know. But if you're going to blame someone in all this, blame the Park Service. They screwed up the scheduling, not the Rainbows or the Scouts.
27 posted on 06/24/2008 11:04:53 AM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: Jonah Hex
Rainbow participants had three or four meetings with Forest Service representatives after choosing the Big Sandy site, before the officials said anything about the Boy Scout conflict, he said. ''We never would have gotten in that position if the Forest Service had indicated from the get-go that this was not a workable site,'' Beck said.

Sounds like someone, somewhere approved their choice.

28 posted on 06/24/2008 11:07:54 AM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: Non-Sequitur
Sue Bradford of Missoula, Mont., who has been attending Rainbow gatherings since 1992, said Rainbow participants notified the Forest Service of the location they’d decided on, and were not told it was a ‘’bad’’ location until several days later, after it was already too late.

Sounds like the Rainbow folks assumed silence equaled consent.

29 posted on 06/24/2008 11:15:58 AM PDT by Jonah Hex ("Never underestimate the hungover side of the Force.")
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To: girlangler

the Rainbows claim to be for the envirnoment, but are not.

They trash the public lands and the communities nearby. Not just drugs, but also tons of waste. The media is quiet as a fellow traveler.

Every year.


30 posted on 06/24/2008 11:21:47 AM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: girlangler

I agree with the destruction that the Rainbows will (and probably already have) cause(d).

One of the creeds of the Boy Scouts is to leave an area better than you found it. When I was a Scoutmaster, the last thing i would have my Scouts do when leaving a campsite, was to check every square inch for anything that didn’t belong there. If we packed it in, we packed it out.

I would dread to see that place after the Rainbows get done, even after the cleanup.


31 posted on 06/24/2008 11:25:42 AM PDT by fredhead (4-cylinder, air cooled, horizontally opposed......THE REAL VW!!!)
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To: Clemenza
There’s been so many, songs about rainbows.

And about what's on the other side....

32 posted on 06/24/2008 11:31:08 AM PDT by thulldud (Congress does not want answers. They want scapegoats. (andy58-in-nh))
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To: Natchez Hawk
No reasons the Scouts and the Gathering can’t get along.

I suppose it has something to do with 20,000 hippies doing their 'things' while 5,000 Boy Scouts try to carry out a reforestation project in the same area. Wouldn't work very well.

33 posted on 06/24/2008 11:35:58 AM PDT by MEGoody (Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall cause you to vote against the Democrats.)
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To: FateAmenableToChange
> > It wasn't until after more than 200 people had gathered at the site and begun digging in kitchens and other infrastructure that the Forest Service told them, "This is a real problem,'' he said. > >

It seems that the Rainbow Family doesn't adhere to the "Leave no trace behind" philosophy of the Boy Scouts of America!

34 posted on 06/24/2008 11:36:40 AM PDT by Redleg Duke ("All gave some, and some gave all!")
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To: girlangler

Some background about Rainbow Family gatherings:

1) The US government, no way, no how, wants gatherings in national parks, ever. So they refuse to issue permits and make pretty ridiculous and expensive demands.

2) For their part, the RF response to the feds is to be as vague as possible about the location of their gatherings, until the last minute, when the word goes out indirectly.

3) The RF are very careful to *not* have leaders that can be, and will be arrested, because there is no way for the government to interact with a crowd. At the end of the gathering, an individual volunteers to drive the garbage truck, knowing that they will be arrested as a “leader” and can get up to six months in jail. He is a sacrifice to the government, and knows it.

4) Gatherings are subdivided into themed camps, which helps to keep the peace. For example, there is usually a camp just for heavy alcohol drinkers, which keeps them away from everybody else.

5) Individuals volunteer to be the equivalent of peacekeepers, carrying two way radios to keep things from getting out of hand. When there is a fight or attempted rape, or things like that, they yell out with a “Hey Rube!” type call. Participants then swarm the offender with a “group hug”. If they are violent, drunk, or deranged they may then be duct taped to a tree until they settle down.

6) Gatherings vary considerably in character. Some have problems with individuals who want to sell goods, or too many people who want things for free. Because individual decisions are frowned upon, often good ideas are ignored in favor of bad group decisions.

7) At the conclusion of gatherings, there are efforts to clean up the area, repair damages, and even to reseed ground with native plants.

8) Uniformed and undercover policemen do try to interfere at times, but are at a disadvantage because of the superior numbers of RF, so usually back off instead of making petty arrests. I have never heard of a large assembly of police assaulting a gathering.

9) Petty crimes in nearby towns and cities do jump up during a gathering, ranging from shoplifting to trespassing, as well as panhandling. Often the problem is water theft, if the gathering has no potable water on site.

There have been a lot of gatherings in past with little or no problem, and most of the time they are not reported in the news.


35 posted on 06/24/2008 11:42:27 AM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy
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To: MEGoody

Still confused about the article. Seems contradictory in places. I thought the service project began in late July and the gathering was over after July 4th. It seemed to say that only clean-up crews would be left after the gathering.


36 posted on 06/24/2008 11:43:59 AM PDT by Natchez Hawk (This is Sammy Israel III filling in for DB Cooper who will be returning next week,)
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To: george76

They’ve been to my neck of the woods twice. They stink. They sh^t in the woods(en mass). Woodstock all over again. Such a waste of humanity.
It seems they believe everyone owes them something, wether it’s a ride to the store or “are you going to the west” when you’re trying to pump gas and get surrounded.


37 posted on 06/24/2008 11:45:09 AM PDT by devistate one four (H I V Homophobia Is Vindicated)
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To: GSWarrior

38 posted on 06/24/2008 11:47:29 AM PDT by GSWarrior
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To: girlangler

Learn to format HTML.


39 posted on 06/24/2008 11:47:32 AM PDT by bmwcyle (If God wanted us to be Socialist, Karl Marx would have been born in America.)
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To: girlangler

Years ago there was a Rainbow gathering WNC near the Smokies and large numbers of the participants came down with giardia from drinking local spring water.


40 posted on 06/24/2008 12:01:45 PM PDT by Rebelbase
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To: girlangler
A bunch of hippies, claiming to be environmentalists, saving the earth, are going into public "fragile" land and building trences, water lines, and latrines, for 20,000 people -- and in the process stop a major project by Boy Scouts to help these forests.

We have the relatively conservative Boy Scouts restoring the forests to their natural condition, and the far left liberal Rainbows trashing the forest so there's no room for the Scouts to come. I doubt that many who have seen the Scouts and the hippies in action are surprised by the contrast.

41 posted on 06/24/2008 12:31:51 PM PDT by RogerD (Educaiton Profesionul)
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To: thulldud

Thanks for providing “the rainbow connection.” ;-)


42 posted on 06/24/2008 12:37:59 PM PDT by Clemenza (No Comment)
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To: Redleg Duke
It seems that the Rainbow Family doesn't adhere to the "Leave no trace behind" philosophy of the Boy Scouts of America!

A Rainbow Family reunion can range from 8000 to 50000 people. (More recent ones are smaller because after 1995 or so they started splitting into different regional gatherings). Advance groups show up and start preparing the location, putting in extremely rudimentary facilities such as pit latrines, etc. Essentially, they build a poor-quality, 18th century infrastructure for a small city that occupies the site for 1-2 weeks. They make some small efforts at cleanup, but there is no way to hide the sewage, erosion, timber cutting, and so on that these people create while occupying their city in the woods.

43 posted on 06/24/2008 12:56:14 PM PDT by FateAmenableToChange
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To: Redleg Duke; george76; jazusamo

“> It wasn’t until after more than 200 people had gathered at the site and begun digging in kitchens and other infrastructure that the Forest Service told them, “This is a real problem,’’ he said. > >”

Yea.

Go to any national forest in the country and get caught digging up a Rhoderdenron, a native plant, or even moving around (or taking) rocks or anything else, and see how fast that gets you a $10,000 federal fine.

Did you know outdoor photographers/writers are now being charged a permit to take photos (if they are to be used for commercial purposes) in national parks?

If I ever get caught photographing in a national park and they try to fine me I am just going to tell them I got lost when the Rainbows had their last meeting there.

Scenario: Park ranger writing ticket for not having photographer’s permit.

Me: “Wow DUDE, this is a national park? I thought it was a national forest DUDE. You mean they didn’t have the Rainbow meeting here? Wow, man, no wonder I couldn’t find my friends. That was some really good **** we smoked.


44 posted on 06/24/2008 1:04:26 PM PDT by girlangler (Fish Fear Me)
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To: girlangler; silent_jonny
Wasn't this an episode of King of the Hill?

BOBBY: I ate hippie gumbo!

There are a ton of great quotes from that episode.

RANGER BRADLEY: Did you know that hippies are the number-one source of airborne and waterborne pollution, right in front of Dow Chemical and Mexican trucks?
HANK: Uh... I'm not sure about that, but those hippies have got to go. What if Bobby and I took care of them ourselves?
RANGER BRADLEY: Great! How many firehoses do you need? I've got some pepper spray that could take down a bear.

KofH Phish and Wildlife

45 posted on 06/24/2008 1:10:33 PM PDT by retrokitten (Kenny, face it, girls don't wanna eat pop-tarts for dinner every night when they get married!)
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To: girlangler
I have reposted it.

Six years from now you will still be getting pings telling you messed up the html on this article. ;-)

46 posted on 06/24/2008 1:13:47 PM PDT by retrokitten (Kenny, face it, girls don't wanna eat pop-tarts for dinner every night when they get married!)
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To: girlangler
Go to any national forest in the country and get caught digging up a Rhoderdenron, a native plant, or even moving around (or taking) rocks or anything else, and see how fast that gets you a $10,000 federal fine.

Exactly...My eyes bugged when I saw in the article they were digging to make facilities for 25,000 people, I didn't think anyone could do that.

47 posted on 06/24/2008 1:45:22 PM PDT by jazusamo (DefendOurMarines.org | DefendOurTroops.org)
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To: retrokitten

LOL. I know. This is NO good excuse, but I am sometimes in a hurry, like today, when I decide to do a quick post.

I am on a deadline today, really rushed. I have posted LOTS of articles on FR with no problems, and this always happens when I need it to the least. I wanted to post this story before I forgot about it.

VERY soon I am going to give myself a home course on posting threads.


48 posted on 06/24/2008 1:46:17 PM PDT by girlangler (Fish Fear Me)
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To: jazusamo; CrappieLuck; george76

Remember Jaz, that article I posted a while back about the environmentalists suing the BLM over a tiny little gas pipeline in Colorado? BTW, I read today the courts allowed that company to start the pipeline.

Where the heck are the Center for Biological Diversity, Sierra Clubbers, and all these people that should be mad over this Rainbow stuff?

Oh, I know, they are all at the Rainbow gathering (GRIN).


49 posted on 06/24/2008 1:53:01 PM PDT by girlangler (Fish Fear Me)
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To: girlangler
VERY soon I am going to give myself a home course on posting threads.

LMAO!!

Video Professor should make "The Video Professor's Guide to Free Republic." It could include sections on formatting posts, how to post a picture, posting LOLcats, ORLY owls and the "I Beat Anorexia" guy, and posting a well-received Opus.

BTW, I'm totally suing the Video Professor if he takes my idea and doesn't give me a cut.

50 posted on 06/24/2008 1:55:54 PM PDT by retrokitten (Kenny, face it, girls don't wanna eat pop-tarts for dinner every night when they get married!)
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