Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Shots heard 'round the world fired near Charleston
The Post and Courier ^ | Saturday, June 28, 2008 | By R.L. SCHREADLEY

Posted on 06/28/2008 4:40:54 AM PDT by PeaRidge

This is Carolina Day, the 232nd anniversary of the Battle of Fort Sullivan. If you are not a native of South Carolinian (and possibly even if you are), you likely have never heard of Fort Sullivan and the significance of this day.

Most American school children have heard stirring stories of the battles of Concord Bridge and Lexington Green, relatively minor skirmishes fought by the Minutemen of Revolutionary lore. These were fought in April 1775, and at Concord Bridge was fired the "shot heard 'round the world." But it was at an unfinished, palmetto-log fort on Sullivan's Island where the cannon shots heard 'round the world were fired. There, 425 Americans fought off a British invasion fleet of 20 ships, foiling an early attempt to occupy Charleston, then the largest and most important city in the colonies south of Philadelphia.

(Excerpt) Read more at charleston.net ...


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Government; US: South Carolina
KEYWORDS: britishinvasion; carolina; charleston; flag; godsgravesglyphs; independence; moultrie; palmetto; south

1 posted on 06/28/2008 4:40:54 AM PDT by PeaRidge
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: PeaRidge
Sadly the American Revolution has become another forgotten war. I do not remember the last time I saw a war special that wasn't about WWII or the Civil War.

All we got was a horrible Mel Gibson movie that was full of historical errors.

2 posted on 06/28/2008 4:43:18 AM PDT by LukeL (Yasser Arafat: "I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LukeL

The HBO series on John Adams was fantastic and is set to be released on DVD soon.


3 posted on 06/28/2008 4:53:45 AM PDT by Dacula (I never left the Republican party, they left me a long time ago.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: PeaRidge
"Another legend is that Sir Peter Parker, the British commander, was struck by a "splinter" on the quarterdeck of his flagship, HMS Bristol, and as a result lost his breeches, leaving "his posteriors quite bare."

Must have been an ancestor of John F'n Kerry. I wonder if he also got a purple heart for this?

4 posted on 06/28/2008 4:56:38 AM PDT by norwaypinesavage (Planting trees to offset carbon emissions is like drinking water to offset rising ocean levels)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: PeaRidge

the palmetto logs used in the walls of the fort were so spongey, they absorbed the shock of the cannonballs during the bombardment.


5 posted on 06/28/2008 4:56:57 AM PDT by gusopol3
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: norwaypinesavage

actually, he went on to achieve immortality as Spider Man.


6 posted on 06/28/2008 4:57:54 AM PDT by gusopol3
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: norwaypinesavage

Shot in the ass and we’re to blame,we give war a bad name.


7 posted on 06/28/2008 5:13:18 AM PDT by TLEIBY308 (I AM PRO CHOICE,I BELEIVE EVERYONE SHOULD CARRY WHAT EVER GUN THEY CHOOSE)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: PeaRidge
Most American school children have heard stirring stories of the battles

No, they haven't. :(

8 posted on 06/28/2008 5:14:10 AM PDT by 668 - Neighbor of the Beast (Only a Kennedy between us and tyranny.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dacula
The HBO series on John Adams was fantastic and is set to be released on DVD soon.

It is out now.

John Adams (HBO Miniseries)

9 posted on 06/28/2008 5:32:29 AM PDT by Pontiac (Your message here.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: 668 - Neighbor of the Beast
Most American school children have heard stirring stories of the battles

In the 50s, 60s and early 70s they did.

But not anymore.

A small part of the general dumbing down, doncha know.

10 posted on 06/28/2008 5:40:10 AM PDT by upchuck (As we doggedly march towards third-world status, my poor country is losing it's mind. God help us!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: PeaRidge; 2A Patriot; 2nd amendment mama; 4everontheRight; 77Jimmy; A Strict Constructionist; ...
South Carolina Ping

Add me to the list. / Remove me from the list.
11 posted on 06/28/2008 5:45:18 AM PDT by upchuck (As we doggedly march towards third-world status, my poor country is losing it's mind. God help us!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LukeL

History channel also has a long running series called “The Revolution”.

I heard that “John Adams” series on HBO was pretty damn incredible. I can’t wait to see it.


12 posted on 06/28/2008 6:01:02 AM PDT by submarinerswife ("If I win I can't 't be stopped! If I lose I shall be dead." - George S. Patton)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: upchuck; Pharmboy
This one ?


13 posted on 06/28/2008 6:04:15 AM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: george76

That picture would date from the Civil War showing the guns at Fort Moultrie firing on the Union Ships. It was built on the site of Fort Sullivan but Fort Sullivan was constructed of the logs of Palmetto trees, not brick like the fort shown. That is why the Palmetto tree is shown on the SC state flag.


14 posted on 06/28/2008 6:09:22 AM PDT by ops33 (Senior Master Sergeant, USAF (Retired))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: LukeL
All we got was a horrible Mel Gibson movie that was full of historical errors.

It was good entertainment -- IT WAS NOT INTENDED, AND NEVER CLAIMED, TO BE A DOCUMENTARY.

15 posted on 06/28/2008 6:13:49 AM PDT by Turret Gunner A20 (Sure I wave the American flag. Do you know a better flag to wave? John Wayne)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ops33

Thanks


16 posted on 06/28/2008 6:25:58 AM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Pontiac

Thank you. I was able to tape it and then convert it to DVD. I am having my 14 year old son watch it this summer and write a report on each episode.


17 posted on 06/28/2008 6:33:20 AM PDT by Dacula (I never left the Republican party, they left me a long time ago.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: submarinerswife

The History channel series was very good.


18 posted on 06/28/2008 6:35:24 AM PDT by Andy'smom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: upchuck

A small part of the general dumbing down, doncha know.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

And a truly fine job of dumbing down is what they have done! I recently had a conversation with a young man in his mid-twenties who (as seems to be fairly typical now) is working at a job that could have been done in the fifties by a high school dropout had there been computers to operate in the fifties. He is a fine young fellow and holds a degree from a local “University”. I asked him a few questions about government and history and most of them were beyond his knowledge, some he answered correctly but seemed to be guessing. I then indulged in a great cruelty! I informed him that everything I asked him about involved what were elementary school studies in the fifties and were all things I had to know to advance beyond the seventh grade and they were so drilled into me that I could not possibly forget most of them if I tried to. I doubt that anything less than the final stages of alzheimer’s could make me forget yet college graduates do not know these things now! Young people who know nothing of the history of the country may be expected to vote for Obamalamadingdong because they have no way of knowing better.


19 posted on 06/28/2008 6:50:45 AM PDT by RipSawyer (Does anyone still believe this is a free country?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: PeaRidge

My childhood home, I grew up right next to the fort and lived there 10 years.

One of my favorite places in the world, though I haven’t been there in 8 years.

Saw a very small house listed there for 800k recently, most homes there are in the 1.5-3+ million dollar range now.

Thanks for posting!


20 posted on 06/28/2008 6:59:52 AM PDT by wolficatZ (Please don't feed the Croco-Stimpy!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: george76; indcons; Chani; thefactor; blam; aculeus; ELS; Doctor Raoul; mainepatsfan; timpad; ...
Thanks to george76 for the ping.

'Sfunny, I was going to post a thread about this when I saw your ping. As I have mentioned before, the RevWar in the South has, IMO, gotten short shrift for several reasons, not the least being that the battles The General took part in have traditionally gotten more ink. The only battle in the Southland that he was at was Yorktown. Otherwise, the rest were in the North (e.g., Brooklyn, Harlem Heights, White Plains, Trenton, Princeton, Brandywine, Germantown, Monmouth).

The RevWar/Colonial History/Gen. Washington ping list

FreepMail me to get on or off this list.

21 posted on 06/28/2008 7:23:46 AM PDT by Pharmboy (Democrats lie because they must.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: LukeL

“I do not remember the last time I saw a war special that wasn’t about WWII or the Civil War. “

The History Channel has been running the multipart “The Revolution” for months.


22 posted on 06/28/2008 7:31:07 AM PDT by CodeToad
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: PeaRidge
The National and State Flag of South Carolina

The Jenerette family has a long history of service to South Carolina and to the nation, from the American Revolution thru the Persian Gulf War. Our flag's history is an important part of our family and our heritiage
ELIAS JEANERETTE is listed on the roster of American troops who served during the Revolutionary War at Fort Sullivan, which was later re-named Fort Moultrie. He enlisted in Georgetown in 1776 and was a Sergeant in the 4th South Carolina Regiment of Artillery, commanded by Col Beekman, in the Company of Capt James Mitchell. Elias was later wounded in the battle of Stono, and was taken as a prisoner of war when Charleston was captured by the British in May 1780. The father of twenty-six children, Elias died in 1833 in North Carolina.

Samuel Thomas Jenerette, Elias and Margaret's youngest son, served in the Confederate Army during the War of Southern Independence in Company "B" Manigault's Battalion of South Carolina Artillery and Samuel's oldest son, Wilson, who served with the 14th South Carolina Volunteer Infantry was captured by the Federals in battle and died in Point Lookout prisoner of war camp in Maryland on September 8, 1862. Wilson was 16 years-old when he enlisted; he was born in Horry County April 11, 1845.

The history of South Carolina's flag
Colonel William Moultrie was asked by the Revolutionary Council of Safety in the fall of 1775 to design a flag for the use of South Carolina troops in preparation for the hostilities with England. He chose a blue that was the color of the Carolina soldiers uniforms and a crescent moon that matched the emblem worn on the front of their caps.

On March 26, 1776 in Charleston, the Second Provincial Congress of South Carolina set up an independent government, ending British rule in the colony and elected John Rutledge as President. It reconvened the same day as the South Carolina General Assembly.

Years later, on December 20, 1860, when South Carolina again declared its right of Independence, this time from the Federal Union, a national flag was needed. The General Assembly considered a wide range of designs and on January 28, 1861 added the palmetto tree to Col. Moultrie's original Revolutionary War flag. The tree symbolized the colonial victory of Sullivan's Island palmetto-log fort against the British in June 1776 and the new design became the National Flag of the Republic of South Carolina.

The 21st Century
Van Jenerette, Major, Infantry, U.S.Army(Ret); is Samuel Thomas Jenerette's great-great-grandson. Van and Katherine's youngest child is named Wilson Jenerette. Katherine Jenerette is a U.S. Army veteran of the Persian Gulf War Operation Desert Storm. She currently is a Commissioned Officer serving in the U.S. Army Reserve and is an Army Paratrooper. She is a graduate of the U.S. Army's Airborne school at Ft. Benning, Georgia and is assigned to the U.S. Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command (Airborne) at Fort Bragg, N.C. and was a Republican candidate for the U.S. Congress, 1st Congressional District, South Carolina in the 2008 primary elections.


23 posted on 06/28/2008 7:40:01 AM PDT by kjenerette (www.jenerette.org - U.S. Army Paratrooper - Operation Desert Storm)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dacula
I am having my 14 year old son watch it this summer and write a report on each episode.

Way to go!

Either you have an extraordinary son or you are an extraordinary parent.

Getting a teenager to do scholarly work like that at all and particularly in the summer is remarkable. You have my utmost respect.

24 posted on 06/28/2008 7:40:40 AM PDT by Pontiac (Your message here.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: PeaRidge; dixie sass
Oh nooooo!

That shot happened on a mo'nin' in April o' eigtheen an' sixty-one! When a group o' fine, fine young suthuhn gentlemen, stationed at Fote Mooltrie, loaded up dey howitzahs an' commenced ta open fiah at th' Yankee devils occupyin' Fote Sumptah in th' middle o' Chaaaastin Habbah! Thus commencin' the fuhst battle in what became known as 'Th' Wah of Nawthuhn Aggrissin'!

25 posted on 06/28/2008 8:01:42 AM PDT by uglybiker (I do not suffer from mental illness. I quite enjoy it, actually.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: RipSawyer
And a truly fine job of dumbing down is what they have done!

Young people who know nothing of the history of the country may be expected to vote for Obamalamadingdong because they have no way of knowing better.

I have long suspected that institutionalizing ignorance is a strategy of the left to easy the country down the road to ever deepening socialism.

But on the other hand education majors are typically failed science and engineering majors (or other more academically rigorous majors). The rest are those looking for an easy job that makes decent buck with summers off and a government pension.

So I do have to wonder as to the future of this country.

26 posted on 06/28/2008 8:03:36 AM PDT by Pontiac (Your message here.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: uglybiker

For some reason, when I read your post I heard James Carville’s voice. YIKES! lol


27 posted on 06/28/2008 8:04:28 AM PDT by kalee (The offenses we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we write in marble. JHuett)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: upchuck

I believe a majority of our HS grads believe we lost the Revolutionary War and that our enemy was North Vietnam.


28 posted on 06/28/2008 8:14:42 AM PDT by PISANO
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: kalee
Actually, I pattern it after Ernest Hollings.

Or, ahem..."Uhnist Hollins: Youuuu-nited Stits Senatah!"

29 posted on 06/28/2008 8:15:32 AM PDT by uglybiker (I do not suffer from mental illness. I quite enjoy it, actually.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Pharmboy
Historians note the courage and marksmanship of the defenders at Fort Sullivan. The steadfastness of Gov. John Rutledge and Col. William Moultrie in the face of such daunting odds was remarkable.

The John Rutledge house in Charleston as it stands today...

30 posted on 06/28/2008 8:18:35 AM PDT by Dr. Scarpetta
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: Pontiac

I have long suspected that institutionalizing ignorance is a strategy of the left to easy the country down the road to ever deepening socialism.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

No doubt about it, it is an accomplished fact at this point. Those who DO study history are fed the marxist version of American history bearing little resemblance to the facts.


31 posted on 06/28/2008 8:19:58 AM PDT by RipSawyer (Does anyone still believe this is a free country?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: RipSawyer

Nice, and very true rant.


32 posted on 06/28/2008 10:00:49 AM PDT by upchuck (As we doggedly march towards third-world status, my poor country is losing it's mind. God help us!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: PISANO
I believe a majority of our HS grads believe we lost the Revolutionary War...

I believe a majority of our HS grads know nothing about the Revolutionary War!

33 posted on 06/28/2008 10:02:28 AM PDT by upchuck (As we doggedly march towards third-world status, my poor country is losing it's mind. God help us!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: PeaRidge
I recommend reading the book “The Southern Strategy” by a buddy of mine named David K. Wilson. It is a great history of the Revolution in the South from the start until the fall of Charleston. I am hoping that he writes about what happened next soon.

Any old board wargamers might be interested in “Savannah 1779” and “Guilford/Eutaw Springs” from GMT. Same time period as the fall of Charleston (within a year anyway).

34 posted on 06/28/2008 10:09:41 AM PDT by Conan the Librarian (The Best in Life is to crush my enemies, see them driven before me, and the Dewey Decimal System)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pharmboy

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·

 
Gods
Graves
Glyphs
Thanks Pharmboy. Just adding to the catalog, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are Blam, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

· Google · Archaeologica · ArchaeoBlog · Archaeology magazine · Biblical Archaeology Society ·
· Mirabilis · Texas AM Anthropology News · Yahoo Anthro & Archaeo ·
· History or Science & Nature Podcasts · Excerpt, or Link only? · cgk's list of ping lists ·


35 posted on 06/28/2008 10:31:25 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_________________________Profile updated Friday, May 30, 2008)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: gusopol3

That’s why the Palmetto Tree is in the SC state flag.


36 posted on 06/28/2008 11:51:35 AM PDT by MissEdie (On the Sixth Day God created Spurrier)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: PeaRidge

Duhhhhhhhhh, I mean to say Sgt. Jasper? Ft. Moultrie WAS Ft. Sullivan. The SC flag is based on the battle. Before the tourists discovered it and the park service took over, we played there. Oceola died there. I guess what I trying to say is this - we grew up knowing about this fort and it’s history before we were taught about it in school.


37 posted on 06/28/2008 5:22:02 PM PDT by dixie sass
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LukeL

THE PATRIOT was not meant to be a true story. The main characters was based on three very different historical figures, Francis Marion being on of them. Also the major battle, while not accurate was based on the Battle of Cowpens. The two main british antagonists were based on Bloody Tarleton and I can’t remember the other. Most movies and books take events and people and base characters and actions on them.

The movie was good and interested a lot of people in South Carolina, the Revolution in the southern states. For your information, one of the best movies that Disney made was based on the capture of Charleston and Francis Marion. It was called, I believe, the Swamp Fox.


38 posted on 06/28/2008 5:55:24 PM PDT by dixie sass
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Pontiac

Oh, of course, lets redirect everything to the North. Bull! If it hadn’t been for the battles fought in SC, Cornwallis might have won. It was the southern states and the battles fought there that saved this country. Also the first president was a South Carolinian. A Virginian was the one who gave us the Bill of Rights or rather the first 10 Amendments of the Constitution. The Constitution was written by a majority of Southerners. Shocked?


39 posted on 06/28/2008 6:08:25 PM PDT by dixie sass
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: dixie sass

Oh, of course, lets redirect everything to the North. Bull!

Indeed Suh! ‘Twas the Northerners who first had the gumption to DO SOMETHING against the British. The brave Minutemen who stood their ground at Concord’s old North Bridge in April of ‘75 are the first real and true American patriots. You sully their good name and deeds with these ‘sectional’ implications.


40 posted on 06/29/2008 8:05:29 AM PDT by Paisan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: PeaRidge

Second Carolina’s Colors

A poem of Colonel Moultrie, Francis Marion, Sergeant William Jasper, the Second South Carolina Regiment, and the Colors that led them into battle.


A fleet of British Men O’ War assaulted Charleston’s port;
Colonel Moultrie’s men defended from a half-completed fort.
And the people on the mainland knew their city would be saved,
So long as Second Carolina’s Colors o’er Sullivan’s Island waved.

Then a chance shot hit the flagstaff, and the flag began to fall;
William Jasper saw it, and to Francis Marion called,
“I’ll get them, Captain; cover me,” he shouted o’er the battle sound;
“Second Carolina’s Colors must not lie upon the ground.”

He climbed upon the parapet and scrambled down its length;
Then lifted up the flagpole using all his strength;
And tied the colors to a sponge staff and lifted them up high;
And Second Carolina’s Colors, waved proudly ‘gainst the sky.

He tipped his hat in mock salute, as he turned to face the ships;
“Hip, Hip, Huzzah,” thrice repeated, roared from Jasper’s lips;
Then he dropped down behind the ramparts, to fire a round or two;
As o’er the fort, for all to see, Second Carolina’s Colors flew.

The British ships came sailing by, firing broadsides stem to stern,
But each was receiving fire, from Sullivan’s Island in return;
And when the Brits had turned to run, and sail for friendlier seas,
Second Carolina’s Colors still flew defiantly in the breeze.

A hundred battles later, and a hundred miles away;
Marion and his men were near Savannah, come to save the day;
General Lincoln gave the briefing; attack Spring Hill Redoubt;
Five columns in assault; Second Carolina’s Colors leading out.

Now Marion didn’t like it; He could see a trap was laid;
But he’d obey his orders, though a price in blood be paid;
And his men would follow Marion, wherever he would lead,
And tales of Second Carolina’s Colors could never match the deed.

Spring Hill was thrice defended, because their plan had been betrayed;
Still, this was Second Carolina and the sacrifice was made;
They broke the British line, with a fearsome battle shout,
And planted Second Carolina’s Colors on Spring Hill Redoubt.

Just when it seemed they had the vict’ry; Brit defenses they did quell;
Came Maitland’s Seventy-first Highlanders, sounding pipes from hell;
Fresh British reinforcements, attacking men half dead;
Second Carolina’s Colors stood in puddles, of blood already shed.

The attack was truly hopeless, and Marion had to call retreat;
His men were dead and dying but would ne’er admit defeat
“You save the men; I’ll get the Colors.” Jasper’s final words and final hope;
But Second Carolina’s Colors were made Holy, by blood spilt on Spring Hill’s slope.

Like a body in a casket, is not the person that we knew;
So the cloth in Britain’s trophy room, is not the flag we flew;
And as Jasper’s spirit soared to heaven, for he’d earned the martyr’s fate;
He bore Second Carolina’s Colors to fly o’er the Pearly Gates.


41 posted on 06/29/2008 5:44:56 PM PDT by night reader (NRA Life Member since 1962)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: PeaRidge
"Most American school children have heard stirring stories of the battles of Concord Bridge and Lexington Green, relatively minor skirmishes fought by the Minutemen of Revolutionary lore."

Most American school children have not heard stirring stories of the battles of Concord Bridge and Lexington Green because their communazi public school teacher's agenda does not permit it. Whether these "minor skirmishes" are really minor is a matter of debate. In the very least, they helped convince English Citizens that they could stand up to the Empire forces.

42 posted on 06/30/2008 2:43:07 AM PDT by RushLake (Typical, and proud, White person.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: submarinerswife

The History Channel was once a favorite stop for me on many an evening. Talk about mush now.


43 posted on 06/30/2008 2:54:47 AM PDT by RushLake (Typical, and proud, White person.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: RushLake
Whether these "minor skirmishes" are really minor is a matter of debate.

I'd say it's not a matter of debate at all---Lexington and Concord were hardly "minor skirmishes" to be resigned to the dustbin of history, except for that they were the first. At Lexington and Concord, the British suffered over 250 casualties. Had not Pickering delayed in coming down from Salem, and had not Percy been able to re-enforce the stragglers with cannon, it is entirely possible that not a single member of the British expeditionary force would have returned from that little jaunt into the countryside with his ghost fully encased in his body.

As it was, the British barely escaped back to the island of Boston. They were pent up there by the Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Connecticut militias for months, and after they failed miserably in their attempt to break out to the north (Breed's Hill), the British were rendered 100% impotent in New England.

"Minor" skirmishes were things like the Powderhouse Alarm or the Salem/Marblehead Alarm. Lexington and Concord and Bunker Hill were major engagements that convinced the British that it was futile to fight in New England.

44 posted on 06/30/2008 11:22:06 AM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost (Spirit of '75)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: LukeL

Be grateful there WAS anything remotely realistic about the RevWar in a major motion picture.

At least all the soldiers (regulars) weren’t wearing those silly white wigs.


45 posted on 06/30/2008 6:24:23 PM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Pharmboy

Agreed, but also probably because of the “Civil War”. The victor writes the history, and in this case they’d want to play down what their “enemy” ever did in the earlier civil war.


46 posted on 06/30/2008 6:26:59 PM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: the OlLine Rebel

Never thought of that...you make an excellent point. The demonization of the South by the North took many forms.


47 posted on 06/30/2008 7:51:00 PM PDT by Pharmboy (Democrats lie because they must.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson