Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Spontaneous Discharge of a Firearm in an MR Imaging Environment
American Journal of Roentgenology ^ | 6 November, 2001 | Anton Oscar Beitia1, Steven P. Meyers, Emanuel Kanal and William Bartell

Posted on 07/11/2008 4:23:55 AM PDT by marktwain

An incident recently occurred at an outpatient imaging center in western New York State, in which a firearm spontaneously discharged in a 1.5-T MR imaging environment with active shielding. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of such an occurrence.

------cut---------

An off-duty police officer went to an outpatient imaging center (not affiliated with our institution) in western New York State to have an MR imaging examination. The facility housed a 1.5-T MR unit (Signa; General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) with active shielding. The officer was carrying a model 1991 A-1 compact.45 caliber semiautomatic pistol (Colt's Manufacturing, Hartford, CT).

The officer notified the technologist that he was carrying the weapon before entering the MR dressing room. The technologist told the officer to take the gun with him. The technologist intended to meet the officer in the MR patient waiting area before the examination and secure the weapon in that room, where he felt it would be safe. However, the officer apparently misunderstood and took the gun into the MR suite. The technologist was entering the officer's personal data into the computer and did not see him entering the MR suite.

Once the officer was inside the MR suite, the gun was pulled from his hand as he attempted to place the gun on top of a cabinet 3 ft (0.9 m) away from the magnet bore. The gun was immediately pulled into the bore, where it struck the left side and spontaneously discharged a round into the wall of the room at the rear of the magnet. Fortunately, no one was injured.

---------cut----------

The weapon's thumb safety was reportedly engaged when the gun discharged.

(Excerpt) Read more at ajronline.org ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Technical
KEYWORDS: bang; banglist; discharge; gun; healthcare; mri
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-96 last
To: PowderMonkey
Phew! Never would happen to me. I carry a Glock...nyuk,nyuk,nyuk. OK, an admittedly cheap shot at all you 1911 guys. Sorry.

I was going to mouth off, but had the good sense to check my MKIV Stainless with a magnet first!

Hmm. Must be Type 400.

What are the Glock barrells made of?

51 posted on 07/11/2008 6:20:00 AM PDT by Gorzaloon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Shooter 2.5
Beware the man who only has one gun. He probably knows how to use it.

Good one. Because when I take the "Hardware Store" to the range, I have to stop and think and remember each one's peculiarities.

52 posted on 07/11/2008 6:23:31 AM PDT by Gorzaloon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: tarheelswamprat
Actually “Technologist” is a term being used now in several technical areas. Sounds snappier than a simple “Technician”, and is designed to reflect the higher level of knowledge and education needed in some of these disciplines, say verses just being a screwdriver jockey.

It's crap, but makes them feel better, and I understand where they are coming from.

53 posted on 07/11/2008 6:28:20 AM PDT by ejonesie22 (Haley Barbour 2012, Because he has experience in Disaster Recovery.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: CrazyIvan; P8riot

“A 1911 should not fire unless the thumb safety is off and the grip safety depressed prior to squeezing the trigger. Unless the MRI unit released these safeties, or the gun was in an unsafe condition; either worn parts or kept unlocked with the hammer down on a chambered round, or a combination of both, I don’t see how this could happen.”

If you read the article it explains that the inertial firing pin block was moved out of position by the magnetic field and the impact of the pistol hitting the magnet caused the he firing pin to hit the primer. Firing during drop tests with the muzzle down was why they started using the inertial pin block in the series 80 colt 1911s.


54 posted on 07/11/2008 6:28:49 AM PDT by Hacklehead (Crush the liberals, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentation of the hippies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: P8riot
A 1911 should not fire unless the thumb safety is off and the grip safety depressed prior to squeezing the trigger. Unless the MRI unit released these safeties, or the gun was in an unsafe condition; either worn parts or kept unlocked with the hammer down on a chambered round, or a combination of both, I don’t see how this could happen.................................................................. The 1911 can and will shear the cock notch off the hammer if the hammer is struck with sufficient force while cocked (locked or not). The safety does not block the hammer, it only keeps the sear locked into the cock notch of the hammer. The hald cock notck will shear off as well.
55 posted on 07/11/2008 6:31:08 AM PDT by wrench
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Gorzaloon

LOL, I am the same way. The gun I use the most in my Walther P99, but when I go shooting I take everything, and have to think about where the safeties are and such.

I liken it to going to the gas station in one of my cars, I have to think which side the filler is on...


56 posted on 07/11/2008 6:32:18 AM PDT by ejonesie22 (Haley Barbour 2012, Because he has experience in Disaster Recovery.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 52 | View Replies]

To: WayneS

I had two MRI’s, one on my stomach and one on my brain, with a surgical steel earring in place because it was the captive-bead style and neither I nor the nurse could figure out how to remove it, and she eventually asked me what it was made of and said that if it was surgical steel it shouldn’t be an issue, and surprisingly enough, it wasn’t. I did make sure to wear stuff like sweatpants and slip-on tennis shoes, though.


57 posted on 07/11/2008 6:37:01 AM PDT by Hyzenthlay (I aim to misbehave.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: ejonesie22
LOL, I am the same way. The gun I use the most in my Walther P99, but when I go shooting I take everything, and have to think about where the safeties are and such.

Try switching form the Colt MKIV to the Mitchell P-08 Luger to the S&W wheelguns to the High Standard to the PPK. It's like taking an exam. THEN there is picking up and separating all the brass...

That's why I have been carrying lighter range cases in recent years, sticking to one caliber a day.

I notice I hit less on the days I bring many of them.

58 posted on 07/11/2008 6:39:42 AM PDT by Gorzaloon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 56 | View Replies]

To: tarheelswamprat
The correct term for someone who operates technical equipment is "technician".

Perhaps you should contact the American Society of Radiologic Technologists or the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists about the improper use of the word "technologists".

59 posted on 07/11/2008 6:40:13 AM PDT by politicalwit (AKA... A Tradition Continues...Now a Hoosier Freeper)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: MarkL

it will also erase the magnetic strip on your credit cards and drivers license


60 posted on 07/11/2008 6:44:58 AM PDT by Mom MD (The scorn of fools is music to the ears of the wise)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Vaquero

“enjoy your big fat mostly plastic tinker toy.”

Since you are looking to start a fight, i’ll point out that the Glock will still be firing when that 1911 relic you have is lying jammed, broken or empty. I will admit that the 1911s have it over glock in the looks department. Does your RR have matching or mismatched parts?


61 posted on 07/11/2008 6:46:09 AM PDT by Hacklehead (Crush the liberals, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentation of the hippies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother

If they have been in for more than a couple of mos the are OK, but they will degrade the image. The worry about metal is something small (ie fragment) that will move to somwhere that it can cause big trouble

For example, welders should not have MRIs - there is a high liklihood of fragments of metal in the eyes that could shift and cause problems with visions. And of course, pacemakers are big no no’s


62 posted on 07/11/2008 6:48:21 AM PDT by Mom MD (The scorn of fools is music to the ears of the wise)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: marktwain

Wow!


63 posted on 07/11/2008 6:49:13 AM PDT by BunnySlippers (Made on a Mac)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sevinufnine

It sounds like he wasn’t listening to the technician.


64 posted on 07/11/2008 6:50:49 AM PDT by caver (Yes, I did crawl out of a hole in the ground.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 50 | View Replies]

To: WayneS
“My fathers 1940’s vintage 1911 was made by the Singer sewing machine company.”

It may be very collectible, and worth a lot of money!
65 posted on 07/11/2008 7:01:04 AM PDT by marktwain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: marktwain

66 posted on 07/11/2008 7:11:53 AM PDT by toast
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother; P8riot; marktwain

IF you’d bother to read the story at the link, you’d find 1) all safeties were engaged, 2) the muzzle connected with the wall of the magnet, causing 3) the free-floating firing-pin to strike the round in the cocked-and-locked chamber. You guys disappoint me.


67 posted on 07/11/2008 7:17:22 AM PDT by brityank (The more I learn about the Constitution, the more I realise this Government is UNconstitutional !!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Vaquero
ATF gun control supporters thank you for publicly listing your firearms. When National registration is enacted you will be expected to account for ======
1 1943 vintage Remington Rand 1911A1,
1 model 19 S&W,
2 Ruger Vaqueros,
1 Colt Mustang,
2 S&W vintage 1890’s break tops,
1 Ruger Redhawk,
1 Ruger Mk II
68 posted on 07/11/2008 7:22:36 AM PDT by B4Ranch (Having custody of a loaded weapon does not arm you. The skill to use the weapon is what arms a man.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: BallyBill

I have several stainless steel staples in my chest from open heart surgery, and I later had several MRI’s no noticeable effect from the magnet though.


69 posted on 07/11/2008 7:27:41 AM PDT by antisocial (Texas SCV - Deo Vindice)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: B4Ranch
as my Tagline so plainly states:

“MOLON LABE!”

70 posted on 07/11/2008 7:33:18 AM PDT by Vaquero (" an armed society is a polite society" Heinlein "MOLON LABE!" Leonidas of Sparta)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 68 | View Replies]

To: brityank
IF you’d bother to read the story at the link

IF you bothered to read ANY of my later posts, you'd find that I've ALREADY corrected myself.

Thank You.

71 posted on 07/11/2008 7:38:20 AM PDT by P8riot (I carry a gun because I can't carry a cop.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 67 | View Replies]

To: Hacklehead
Since you are looking to start a fight, i’ll point out that the Glock will still be firing when that 1911 relic you have is lying jammed, broken or empty

It never jams, has never broken(why would it?)....and I AIM (and hit what I aim at), I don't “spray and pray.....” so unless you put up a division against me, I win.

Missmatched parts? hard to tell, the slide, barrel and frame are all RR. did some armorer miss match the parts? being they are not serial numbered it would be hard to tell, but I shoot and enjoy it for what it is.....

72 posted on 07/11/2008 7:40:44 AM PDT by Vaquero (" an armed society is a polite society" Heinlein "MOLON LABE!" Leonidas of Sparta)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 61 | View Replies]

To: Vaquero

Tactical Tupperware Tantrum


73 posted on 07/11/2008 7:42:01 AM PDT by P8riot (I carry a gun because I can't carry a cop.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 72 | View Replies]

To: marktwain
Once the officer was inside the MR suite, the gun was pulled from his hand as he attempted to place the gun on top of a cabinet 3 ft (0.9 m) away from the magnet bore. The gun was immediately pulled into the bore, where it struck the left side and spontaneously discharged a round into the wall of the room at the rear of the magnet. Fortunately, no one was injured.

Stupid cop. MRI = MAGNETIC .... what's in a pistol? METAL.

This isn't a spontaneous firing; this is a negligent discharge from someone too stupid to realize that you don't bring ferrous metals anywhere near a running MRI.

74 posted on 07/11/2008 7:46:51 AM PDT by Centurion2000 (A citizen using a weapon to shoot a criminal is the ultimate act of independence from government.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Hacklehead
Thanks, mine’s a 40’s era Colt. Guess I need to study up on them a bit.
75 posted on 07/11/2008 8:05:01 AM PDT by CrazyIvan (If you read only one book this year, read "Stolen Valor".)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 54 | View Replies]

To: Pistolshot

Does the design take into account EVERY part being manipulated by an external force? The forces around the MRI magnet are not limited to triggers and external safety releases, they pull on ALL parts, making them move in ways that were probably not anticipated by Colt.


76 posted on 07/11/2008 8:29:48 AM PDT by ctdonath2 (The average piece of junk is more meaningful than our criticism designating it so. - Ratatouille)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Hacklehead; Vaquero

I’m glad this “fight” is over the internet. If not, everyone would be ducking and running for cover like it was high noon. ;-)


77 posted on 07/11/2008 8:33:24 AM PDT by spotbust1 (Procrastinators of the world unite . . . . .tomorrow!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 61 | View Replies]

To: marktwain

Ah, yes. I once worked for a biotech company who rented lab space in a medical building. We were fine until we started losing data from some of the workstations, and mysteriously the backup tapes (in the same room) were wiped as well. So my partner and I were in there scratching our heads over the whole thing when she says “Holy stuff, lookathat!” or something close to it. There were three paperclips stuck to the wall. Somebody had rented the space next door and installed an MRI machine. Dangedest thing we ever saw.


78 posted on 07/11/2008 8:51:03 AM PDT by Billthedrill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dr.Zoidberg
Many have ferrous metal detectors set up near them. Many are removed due to false readings on almost every patient. The issue is not metal per se but ferrous materials. Any metal that reacts to a magnetic field can be potentially fatal to someone between that object and the magnet (depending on acceleration time and mass).

To make the situation even more interesting, the newer 3 Tesla (3T) magnets have an acceleration factor up to 14 times greater than than the 1.5 T magnet in this story and are thus much more dangerous when ferrous materials are present in the vicinity.

Besides the danger and fear factors contained in this story, mention was made in passing of having to turn off the magnet to remove the pistol. While this is a relatively easy process, it is also an expensive one. The last bill I received after a magnet quench (turning off the magnet) was over $140,000. Sometimes you can prevent this expense by pulling the item out of the magnet (the only such incident at a facility I worked in concerned a metal mop bucket brought into the space by a new employers who ignored the signs), took a nylon rope and 12, yes I said 12, full grown men to remove it. Superconductor magnets are not to be trifled with.

Irregardless of any other precautions put in place, the ultimate responsibility for MRI safety is the technologist working with a MRI machine. NOBODY, and I mean NOBODY should lay a hand on the door of that MRI room without the MRI technologist giving permission for that person to do so, and then only after through questioning and inspection of that persons corpus.

It is not only external materials that are potential problems. Internal parts (replacement hips, other joints, ear devices in kids, cardiac stents, brain stents, etc.) are also a potential danger to the patient during an MRI study. Orthopedic implants should be in place a minimum of 90 days before a patient has an MRI, while incomputable metallic implants in soft tissues can and will move and heat up during an MRI exam.

Folks, If you are ever unsure of what to do when getting one of these exams done, make sure you ask the technologist and share your concerns with him/her.

Be safe, be well.

79 posted on 07/11/2008 8:59:27 AM PDT by RetiredNavy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: tarheelswamprat
Another example of the ongoing degradation of English language skills by our so-called educational system. The correct term for someone who operates technical equipment is "technician". Sheesh...

Not necessarily.

Many support people in the medical field fall into two levels of training and capabilities. My ex-wife, for example, took a 4-year course (and received a BSc degree) at a major university to become a medical technologist.

She could run lab tests (or even the lab itself) and do quite a number of other things which were outside of the knowledge and expertise of a 2-year degreed medical technician.

80 posted on 07/11/2008 9:07:16 AM PDT by Bob
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: ejonesie22; politicalwit
Actually “Technologist” is a term being used now in several technical areas. Sounds snappier than a simple “Technician”, and is designed to reflect the higher level of knowledge and education needed in some of these disciplines, say verses just being a screwdriver jockey.

I'm aware of the derivation of these sorts of titles - this "title inflation" has permeated every aspect of our culture. Custodial engineer "sounds snappier" than janitor, "waste management engineer" sounds snappier than garbageman, Human Resources Administrator sounds snappier than Personnel Manager, etc., etc., etc. ad nauseum....

None of that changes the fact that it's all pretentious puffery... /grin

81 posted on 07/11/2008 9:34:46 AM PDT by tarheelswamprat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 53 | View Replies]

To: P8riot

The gun fired because it slammed into the MRI machine with enough force that inertia overcame the firing pin spring and the pin hit the primer with enough force to make it fire. Having seen the rest of this report and pictures, when the gun was retrieved the safety was still on, LOCKING the slide forward and the EMPTY case was not ejected from the pistol. The hammer was still at full cock. My shooting buddy is a radiologist and this was big news last year when he showed the account of the incident.

The series 80 Colts have a firing pin lock that is supposed to prevent this freakish sort of slamfire.


82 posted on 07/11/2008 9:44:06 AM PDT by M1928A1 Thompson ("A policeman's job is only easy in a police state!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Hacklehead; Vaquero
Ah yes, the Yugo (Glock) vs. Cadillac (1911) argument again. Shoot what you shoot best, arguments like this are childish.

Glocks don't work for me (the grip angle is way off for me), but I can nail 8" steel plates at 50 yds all day long with my 1911s, and none of them have ever given me any trouble.

83 posted on 07/11/2008 9:45:10 AM PDT by P8riot (I carry a gun because I can't carry a cop.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 61 | View Replies]

To: M1928A1 Thompson

Yes I know


84 posted on 07/11/2008 9:51:09 AM PDT by P8riot (I carry a gun because I can't carry a cop.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 82 | View Replies]

To: Does so
I had to read the article.

:-(

The MRI pulled up on the sear, internally. Short of an empty chamber, there was nothing that could be done to avoid this discharge. No safety "failed". All the the thumb safety did was to keep the weapon from chambering a new round. This article appeared at my forensic site last May, and apparently occurred eight years ago.

—Horatio

;-)

85 posted on 07/11/2008 9:59:05 AM PDT by Does so (...against all enemies, DOMESTIC and foreign...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Vaquero

“Missmatched parts? hard to tell, the slide, barrel and frame are all RR. did some armorer miss match the parts?”

Shortly after the start of WWII when production of 1911s was gearing up, colt shipped large batches of older parts (WWI vintage) to other manufacturers including RR. Consequently some have slides from Colt and Frames from RR, or vis versa. I think the ones with the mixed parts are favored by collectors.


86 posted on 07/11/2008 10:00:45 AM PDT by Hacklehead (Crush the liberals, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentation of the hippies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 72 | View Replies]

To: antisocial

Most stainless steel alloys are not magnetic, a discovery that greatly annoyed my refrigerator magnet addicted sister upon completion of her kitchen remodeling frenzy.

I enjoyed much mirth and merriment at her wrath upon my cluttered ‘fridge door hating, aircraft mechanic brother-in-law, who understanding why compasses are mounted with brass or stainless screws, slyly endorsed her selection of stainless steel appliances.


87 posted on 07/11/2008 10:04:58 AM PDT by M1928A1 Thompson ("A policeman's job is only easy in a police state!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 69 | View Replies]

To: RetiredNavy

I’ve never had an MRI or CAT and haven’t had any but dental X-Rays in 20 years. So MRI tech is relatively unknown to me.

I knew an MRI was dangerous in the presence of ferrous materials, but that’s about it...

If they have metal detecting equipment, then they should use it and just eat the false alerts, what’s the use of having security equipment if you ignore it?


88 posted on 07/11/2008 10:18:40 AM PDT by Dr.Zoidberg ("Shut the hell up, New York Times, you sanctimonious whining jerks!" - Craig Ferguson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 79 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother
I believe that a 1991A1 is a series 80 action, with a firing pin safety that only releases the FP when the trigger is pressed fully rearwards.

I doubt even if the hammer notch failed when it struck the MRI machine that a round would discharge-again, the trigger would have to be pressed and the grip safety would have to have been released as well.....

I am betting on some spontaneous ignition of the primer via static or other EM energy source....

Any CE/ME/EEs out there with some insight on this circumstance?

Does lead styphnate (priming compound) combine under strong EM fields and detonate?

God Bless

89 posted on 07/11/2008 10:22:05 AM PDT by Manly Warrior (US ARMY (Ret) "No Free Lunches for the Dogs of War")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: tarheelswamprat
Yeah, it makes one feel better.

In away I am sympathetic. I have a lot of folks call me the “Computer guy” or “IT Guy”, belaying that fact that I am actually the IT manager/director and have hard earned degrees and certifications out the a$$. I kind of laugh it off, but my newest green tech is also a “Computer guy”

90 posted on 07/11/2008 10:28:47 AM PDT by ejonesie22 (Haley Barbour 2012, Because he has experience in Disaster Recovery.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 81 | View Replies]

To: Manly Warrior

Hmm. I guess I fall into the “shoulda read more” crowd.

Okay, I’ll buy it -the magnetism retracted the firing pin plunger and pulled the FP hard enough to fire the round....


91 posted on 07/11/2008 10:33:36 AM PDT by Manly Warrior (US ARMY (Ret) "No Free Lunches for the Dogs of War")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 89 | View Replies]

To: ejonesie22

Understood!... /grin

I’m on several boards of directors, President of one organization and Vice-President of another. Whenever I’m asked what my position is, however, I usually just say “chief gopher” or “designated lackey”. I’ve found it puts people at ease and usually makes it a lot easier to work with them.

I understand that there are legitimate professional distinctions and classifications, and that it’s sometimes helpful to be specific and precise when referring to them. I do believe, however, that our society as a whole has gone overboard with title inflation and organizational jargon to the point of fetishisation... /grin


92 posted on 07/11/2008 11:13:11 AM PDT by tarheelswamprat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 90 | View Replies]

To: tarheelswamprat

Hey, it is good for the economy, keeps business card makers busy ;-)


93 posted on 07/11/2008 12:18:12 PM PDT by ejonesie22 (Haley Barbour 2012, Because he has experience in Disaster Recovery.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 92 | View Replies]

To: marktwain
Once the officer was inside the MR suite, the gun was pulled from
his hand as he attempted to place the gun on top of a cabinet
3 ft (0.9 m) away from the magnet bore.


Reminds me of the History Channel's "Lost Worlds" series on
Oak Ridge TN.
(Hope I don't bungle the details of the following)
It was mentioned that in the early method of separating uranium
isotopes the devices used were a series of hugmongous electromagnets...
and that there was a painted line down the gallery of the machines
to remind people to not go any closer (3-4 ft?) to the magnets
unless they had ALL metal off their persons.

I think they said there were stories of forgetful technicians
getting pulled and stuck to the machines (until the clothing could
be cut away from the metal, such as a metal pen in the pocket).
94 posted on 07/11/2008 5:27:29 PM PDT by VOA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dr.Zoidberg
The issue is one of complacency. When it goes off for every patient, soon people, even those that know better, tend to ignore the warning. We have also noticed that, over time, people tend to depend on the detectors for screening and the investigation and questioning process becomes a sometimes thing.

We have found that a much better process is to require a standardized questionnaire, consistent questioning, and if in doubt, investigation of specific types of implants to determine MRI compatibility. If there is ANY doubt whatsoever, that patient gets another type of study.

95 posted on 07/11/2008 6:13:11 PM PDT by RetiredNavy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 88 | View Replies]

To: antisocial

As you noted, current surgical staples and clips are almost invariably stainless steel, with a very low or non-existant magnet pull. Irregardless of the the type of metal, overexposure to a MRI magnetic field can still cause magnetic eddy currents which result in heating of the metal in question. In a normal study this typically is not a problem, but it can be a POTENTIAL issue with extended exams in high strength fields.

Those with tattoos should volunteer that information as many tattoo inks incorporate metallic compounds. The potential discomfort from heating can be alleviated with the use of cold compresses if the the technologist knows of them.


96 posted on 07/14/2008 6:33:13 AM PDT by RetiredNavy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 69 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-96 last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson