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UC Santa Barbara chemist goes nano with CoQ10
PHYSORG ^ | July 24, 2008 | University of California - Santa Barbara

Posted on 07/24/2008 2:59:45 PM PDT by vietvet67

If Bruce Lipshutz has his way, you may soon be buying bottles of water brimming with the life-sustaining coenzyme CoQ10 at your local Costco.

Lipshutz, a professor of chemistry at UC Santa Barbara, is the principal author of an upcoming review, "Transition Metal Catalyzed Cross-Couplings Going Green: in Water at Room Temperature," which will be published in Aldrichimica Acta in September. In it, Lipshutz and post-doctoral researcher Subir Ghorai discuss how recent advances in chemistry can be used to solubilize otherwise naturally insoluble compounds like CoQ10 into water.

Never heard of CoQ10? Lipshutz says you're not alone. "If you don't know anything about it," Lipshutz said during a recent interview, "that's not surprising to me. Much of the public hasn't heard of it." But he's on a mission to correct what he views as a major oversight. "In a sense, I'm just a messenger. People need to not only know about CoQ10, they need to take it."

Like vitamin C, CoQ10 is a compound that's vital to our survival. It's a coenzyme that our cells synthesize, albeit in 21 steps, and it's in every cell. This contrasts with a vitamin, such as vitamin C, which is not made by the body. Both CoQ10 and vitamin C are "compounds of evolution," Lipshutz said. "Everybody accepts the importance of vitamin C. The reason the public does not fully appreciate it is that there's no Linus Pauling for CoQ10. There is no champion."

Pauling, a Nobel Prize-winning scientist, was also an advocate for greater consumption of vitamin C. "CoQ is not really in that category of public awareness yet," Lipshutz said.

(Excerpt) Read more at physorg.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: coq10; health; nutraceuticals; nutrition; profiteering; vitamins

1 posted on 07/24/2008 2:59:45 PM PDT by vietvet67
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To: vietvet67
CoQ10 is expensive, though. Especially compared to vitamin C.
2 posted on 07/24/2008 3:10:32 PM PDT by isrul (Help make every day, "Disrespect a muzzie day.")
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To: isrul

My daughter’s neurologist recommended that we try this for my daughter’s migraine headaches.

We haven’t started using it yet.


3 posted on 07/24/2008 3:13:19 PM PDT by luckystarmom
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To: luckystarmom

Don’t know for sure but heard it’s good in large dosage for Parkinsons.


4 posted on 07/24/2008 3:16:02 PM PDT by FES0844 (FES0844)
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To: vietvet67

I added it to my vitamins a couple of years ago and have not been sick since—no colds, flu or anything else.


5 posted on 07/24/2008 3:19:10 PM PDT by freeangel ( (free speech is only good until someone else doesn't like what you say))
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To: luckystarmom

Make SURE it’s Ubiquinol and not Ubiquinone.

Ubiquinone is produced by fermenting inedible things such as tobacco leaves, for example.

Ubiquinol was created by the Japanese and is produced solely from plant sources dedicated to the manufacturing of it.

Plus, it takes approximately 1/3 the dosage of Ubiquinol to achieve the same blood levels as Ubiquinone.

Here’s a random article from a Google search:

http://www.lef.org/newshop/items/item01252.html

For many years, I had mitral valve prolapse.
I started taking CoQ10 and a few years later, no one could find the MVP.

The doctors said they’d never heard of MVP just “going away” but it apparently did.

I also give it to one of my old dogs who has a heart murmur and it’s helped her dramatically.


6 posted on 07/24/2008 3:20:16 PM PDT by Salamander (And don't forget my Dog; fixed and consequent......)
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To: isrul

Yes, compared to C.

Being on statins I take the Q-Gel type(better absorbed in lesser amounts) and it works out to about 37 cents a day.


7 posted on 07/24/2008 3:22:26 PM PDT by vietvet67
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To: FES0844

It’s also a MUST HAVE for anyone taking cholesterol drugs such as Lipitor.

All statins suck it right out of your body and low CoQ10 levels can lead to heart attacks, strokes and other fun cardiac events.

In fact, Lipitor [after a lawsuit] starting adding a piddling amount of CoQ10 to to its pills.


8 posted on 07/24/2008 3:23:32 PM PDT by Salamander (And don't forget my Dog; fixed and consequent......)
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To: luckystarmom
I never heard of that application. But if the doc says so, you're lucky. Most doctors are clueless about anything that isn't a drug. It certainly won't hurt. Migraines are awful. Did your daughter ever try acupuncture?
9 posted on 07/24/2008 3:24:27 PM PDT by isrul (Help make every day, "Disrespect a muzzie day.")
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To: vietvet67
That's not bad, at all. Did a doctor recommend that because of the statins or did you find out about it on your own?
10 posted on 07/24/2008 3:26:57 PM PDT by isrul (Help make every day, "Disrespect a muzzie day.")
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To: isrul

Saw it written about at alot of sources especially for people on statins. Decided on my own. No gripes from any doctors yet.


11 posted on 07/24/2008 3:37:55 PM PDT by vietvet67
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To: Salamander
I was getting muscle pains all over my chest while I was taking Lipitor. I started taking C0Q10 and the pains are GONE. It is a MUST with statin drugs.
12 posted on 07/24/2008 3:38:24 PM PDT by Plumres
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To: Plumres

Where is it available?


13 posted on 07/24/2008 3:41:38 PM PDT by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: tet68
Drug stores and grocery stores. I get mine at Sam's Club. I buy the 300mg size. It is something like 22.00 for 60 gel caps. I had a stent put in last Nov and they upped me from 20 to 40 mg of Lipitor. I had so much pain, I thought I was having a heart attack. Two days after starting with 150mg of CoQ10 I got relief. I am back on 20mg of Lipitor now. My cholesterol went down too low!
14 posted on 07/24/2008 3:48:26 PM PDT by Plumres
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To: isrul

It’s quite cheap if you buy it at Sam’s Club.

I’ve been taking it 3 times per day for 8 years.

In July, 2000, a viral infection lodged in my heart. I grew weaker and weaker, my body felt like it was made of
lead, and I could barely climb steps. My sister pleaded with me to go to the emergency room, which I did.

I spent three days in intensive care. I didn’t have a doctor, so the woman doctor on call that day became my physician. (Months later, she told me that the medical staff at the hospital was amazed that I was still alive when I arrived at the emergency room). My heart was badly damaged, and behind the scenes, the powers that be were discussing the possibility of giving me a heart transplant!

Long story short, the doctor suggested I take COQ-10, and my heart function returned to normal, and it’s been normal ever since, and that was eight years ago.

In my case, COQ-10 was a cure for dilated cardio-mypathy.


15 posted on 07/24/2008 3:50:40 PM PDT by july4thfreedomfoundation (Four members of the U.S. Supreme Court don't understand the words "shall not be infringed.")
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To: july4thfreedomfoundation

Great stuff! I’ve been taking 200 mg a day for years.


16 posted on 07/24/2008 3:55:33 PM PDT by traderrob6
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To: vietvet67

bfl


17 posted on 07/24/2008 4:15:51 PM PDT by Oshkalaboomboom
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To: vietvet67

So is CoQ10 in foods like potato chips, fried chicken, beer, cigars?


18 posted on 07/24/2008 4:27:40 PM PDT by sergeantdave (We are entering the Age of the Idiot)
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To: sergeantdave

“So is CoQ10 in foods like potato chips, fried chicken, beer, cigars?”

lol. All of the above, especially beer & cigars.

http://www.newmediaexplorer.org/chris/2005/05/27/why_doctors_dont_recommend_more_the_use_of_coq10.htm


19 posted on 07/24/2008 4:38:27 PM PDT by vietvet67
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To: vietvet67
Lipshutz has a history of CoQ10 research at UCSB. Initially, he retooled the chemistry that would produce the supplement via synthesis instead of fermentation,

A few years ago I spotted a car getting gas with the license plate "CoQ10". I spoke with the passenger who said that the driver had figured out how to synthesize CoQ10. But the car was in the Seattle area rather than California. Maybe he moved after this.

I've been taking CoQ10 for a while although not as much as I would like since it is still somewhat expensive.

20 posted on 07/24/2008 4:41:16 PM PDT by wideminded
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To: FES0844
Don’t know for sure but heard it’s good in large dosage for Parkinsons.

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/press_releases/pressrelease_parkinsons_coenzymeq10_101402.htm

Results of the first placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial of the compound coenzyme Q10 suggest that it can slow disease progression in patients with early-stage Parkinson's disease (PD). While the results must be confirmed in a larger study, they provide hope that this compound may ultimately provide a new way of treating PD.

The phase II study, led by Clifford Shults, M.D., of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine, looked at a total of 80 PD patients at 10 centers across the country to determine if coenzyme Q10 is safe and if it can slow the rate of functional decline. The study was funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and appears in the October 15, 2002, issue of the Archives of Neurology . 1

“This trial suggested that coenzyme Q10 can slow the rate of deterioration in Parkinson's disease,” says Dr. Shults. “However, before the compound is used widely, the results need to be confirmed in a larger group of patients.”

21 posted on 07/24/2008 4:41:30 PM PDT by HangnJudge
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To: vietvet67

Bump for later because I’m a UCSB grad, this Cq10 stuff sounds intriguing, and the solubility of metals in nano scale has implications for energy production as well, which Dr. Arata recently demonstrated.


22 posted on 07/24/2008 4:53:22 PM PDT by Kevmo (A person's a person, no matter how small. ~Horton Hears a Who)
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To: Salamander
I also give it to one of my old dogs who has a heart murmur and it’s helped her dramatically.

What is the dosage for dogs? My Molly is a senior dog and has been slowing down lately...
23 posted on 07/24/2008 4:57:15 PM PDT by goldfinch
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To: goldfinch

I err on the side of caution because CoQ10 can be a bit stimulating.

Izzy weighs about 60 pounds and I give her 30mg.

She’s had 50mg with no problems but I reduced the dosage once she started showing improvement.

Way down at the bottom of this page is a recommended dosage chart for dogs:

http://www.thorne.com/media/heart_disease_dogs.pdf

I’d start on the low side, if it were my dog, until I saw how it reacted to it.

Hug ol’ Molly for me....:)


24 posted on 07/24/2008 5:35:40 PM PDT by Salamander (And don't forget my Dog; fixed and consequent......)
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To: vietvet67

bump


25 posted on 07/24/2008 5:37:29 PM PDT by VOA
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To: Plumres

Those muscle pains were a precursor to chronic, unrelenting agony.

Good thing you caught it when you did.

Some statin users have been permanently crippled by them, particularly their legs.


26 posted on 07/24/2008 7:19:48 PM PDT by Salamander (And don't forget my Dog; fixed and consequent......)
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To: Plumres

Hubby’s doctor immediately took him OFF statins when we first started going to him and put him on a high dose of niacin, same as he takes himself.
[up to 4 grams a day]

His blood pressure and cholesterol levels have never been better even though he still eats fried foods and butter.

Lecithin capsules or granules will also knock it out of your bloodstream but be careful....it can lower your cholesterol *too* fast if you go wild with it in the beginning.


27 posted on 07/24/2008 7:24:26 PM PDT by Salamander (And don't forget my Dog; fixed and consequent......)
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To: Plumres

Unfortunately, most doctors either don’t know about it or refuse to recommend it to their patients. We’re responsible for our own health care.


28 posted on 07/24/2008 7:25:44 PM PDT by Conservativegreatgrandma
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To: vietvet67

Thank you for posting that very informative page.

[I have some loved ones whose faces I’m going to shove it in...for their own good]....LOL!


29 posted on 07/24/2008 7:28:19 PM PDT by Salamander (And don't forget my Dog; fixed and consequent......)
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To: vietvet67; Salamander; isrul; Plumres
Statin Snag

By Nathan Seppa
July 23rd, 2008

Size Gene variant places some people at risk of side effect from statins

Cholesterol-reducing drugs called statins do their job with remarkable efficiency, but in rare individuals they can cause a painful muscle side effect called myopathy. Researchers report in an upcoming issue of the New England Journal of Medicine the discovery of a gene variant that places people at risk of this complication.

The gene, called SLCO1B1, encodes a protein that shuttles compounds from the blood stream into the liver for processing. This cargo includes statins.

Properly deposited, these drugs then go on to decrease the levels of LDL, the bad cholesterol.

But people with the variant form of the gene make a version of this protein that transports statins poorly, leaving an excess amount in the blood stream, says study coauthor Rory Collins, a physician and epidemiologist at the University of Oxford in England.

From there the story gets rather mysterious. “It’s still not clear how statins cause myopathy,” he says. But left to linger in the blood, statins seem to have that effect. “The mechanism is unknown.”

Collins and his colleagues suspected that statins were involved because a trial had shown that people getting high doses of a statin were 10 times as likely to develop the side effect as people receiving a low dose, Collins says. But since not everyone gets myopathy on high-dose statins, the scientists guessed that a gene — or a rogue form of one — might explain some of the risk.

Blood samples were collected from 192 of the trial volunteers between 1998 and 2001. Half the volunteers had myopathy, half did not. The statin used in the trial was simvastatin, marketed as Zocor. The scientists screened thousands of genes in these blood samples, and the one that stood out was SLCO1B1.

Genes often come in a variety of forms, resulting in the assemblage of slightly different proteins. The researchers found that among people taking high-dose simvastatin, those who carried one particular variant of the SLCO1B1 gene had four times the risk of myopathy compared with people carrying other forms of SLCO1B1. If a person carried two copies of this variant — one inherited from each parent — the risk shot up 17-fold, the researchers report.

“We’ve always suspected there are genetic differences,” says endocrinologist Robert Hegele of the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario “It’s great that they did this study.”

Hegele estimates that roughly five to 10 percent of patients on statins report some muscle aches and pains at some point.

Collins and his team calculated that 18 percent of people with two copies of the gene variant who take a high does of statins would develop myopathy, while three percent of people who harbor only one copy and take the high drug dose would get myopathy.

Severe myopathy can damage muscles and even the kidneys. The researchers calculated that nearly two-thirds of the cases of myopathy in patients taking high-dose statins are attributable to the variant.

Doctors might avoid giving statins to people who have two copies of the variant and prescribe only low-dose statins for people carrying one copy, reasons physician Yusuke Nakamura of the University of Tokyo, writing in the same NEJM issue.

As an alternative, doctors might use the anti-cholesterol drug ezetimibe, sold as Zetia, which lowers LDL via a mechanism different from that employed by statins, Hegele says. Statins reduce cholesterol production in the liver, whereas Zetia inhibits cholesterol absorption in the intestines.

While doctors’ offices aren’t equipped to test for the gene, Collins says, the actual lab test for the variant is inexpensive. “The technology is straightforward. It would cost less than a dollar in a standard genetics lab,” he says.

The number of people in the United States taking statins nearly doubled from 2000 to 2005, rising from 15.8 million to 29.7 million, according to the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey conducted by the federal government.

30 posted on 07/24/2008 7:52:42 PM PDT by blam
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To: Salamander

Thank you. I bookmarked the page with the dosage. I only had 50mg CoQ-10 so I punctured one capsule and squirted part of it into her food. So far, so good. Molly is a character. I want to keep her with me as long as I can.


31 posted on 07/24/2008 10:53:21 PM PDT by goldfinch
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To: Conservativegreatgrandma

Yes we are responsible for our own health.


32 posted on 07/25/2008 6:22:43 AM PDT by Plumres
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To: blam
I've known a few people who have experienced that side effect.
33 posted on 07/25/2008 8:16:02 AM PDT by isrul (Help make every day, "Disrespect a muzzie day.")
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To: july4thfreedomfoundation
That's great. Hope you continue to do fine:)
34 posted on 07/25/2008 8:21:22 AM PDT by isrul (Help make every day, "Disrespect a muzzie day.")
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To: vietvet67
Sometimes what you find out on your own is more beneficial.
35 posted on 07/25/2008 8:25:21 AM PDT by isrul (Help make every day, "Disrespect a muzzie day.")
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