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This day in History: Atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki (Happy Nagasaki Day!)
History Channel ^ | August 9, 2008 | Staff

Posted on 08/09/2008 3:50:28 AM PDT by abb

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Another great day in United States military history.
1 posted on 08/09/2008 3:50:28 AM PDT by abb
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To: indcons

ping


2 posted on 08/09/2008 3:50:46 AM PDT by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
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To: abb
These anniversaries should be noted in every public school and the deterrent effect of armed might should be taught over and over and over and over and over and over and over and . . .
3 posted on 08/09/2008 4:09:48 AM PDT by WorkingClassFilth (Don't cheer for Obama too hard - the krinton syndicate is moving back into the WH.)
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To: abb

Thus ended WWII and alleviating the need to invade the island of Japan which would have cost hundreds of thousands of American lives.
GOOD JOB


4 posted on 08/09/2008 4:10:45 AM PDT by Joe Boucher (An enemy of Islam)
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To: abb

And if they didn’t surrender after Nagasaki... it meant that Olympic and Coronet were the next on the docket. The loss of life in an invasion of Japan, at that time, is mind-boggling.


5 posted on 08/09/2008 4:13:00 AM PDT by johnny7 ("Duck I says... ")
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Nagasaki was the secondary target. Kokura was the primary target but the bomb could not be dropped even after three runs on the target due to cloud cover, smoke and haze preventing the sighting of the target by the bombardier, Kermit Beahan.

[back row (L-R)] Captain Beahan, Captain Van Pelt, Jr., First Lt. Albury, Second Lt. Olivi, Major Sweeney

Staff Sgt. Buckley, Master Sgt. Kuharek, Sgt. Gallagher, Staff Sgt. DeHart, Sgt. Spitzer


6 posted on 08/09/2008 4:16:01 AM PDT by A.A. Cunningham
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To: johnny7

I’ve not gotten to this one yet. Any reviews from FReepers?
http://www.warbirdforum.com/downfall.htm


7 posted on 08/09/2008 4:17:12 AM PDT by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
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To: Joe Boucher
Thus ended WWII and alleviating the need to invade the island of Japan which would have cost hundreds of thousands of American lives.

I've seen numerous interviews of men who were readying to invade the main island and they were overjoyed at the news. Prior to that, they ALL considered themselves as "dead men walking".

8 posted on 08/09/2008 4:19:33 AM PDT by libertylover (You can't "Tylenol" your way out of arthritis either but it sure as hell helps to relieve the pain.)
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To: libertylover

My grandfather was on the Bunker Hill when it got kamikazee’d during Okinawa. Never had to do much to convince him the bomb was a good thing.


9 posted on 08/09/2008 4:23:42 AM PDT by dirtboy
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To: abb
It just makes me warm and fuzzy thinking about it!!! We did it... they deserved it... American and Japanese lives were spared... and the Japan of today would NEVER exist if we had not done it. I just wish we would do it today with iran.... hear me imanutjob??? I love it when we KILL our enemies in grand America style! Yeah baby!!!!

LLS

10 posted on 08/09/2008 4:33:28 AM PDT by LibLieSlayer ( press)
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To: abb

“Another great day in United States military history.”

Absolutely true, but that “Happy Nagasaki day” jibe in the headline is childish.


11 posted on 08/09/2008 4:34:05 AM PDT by TalBlack
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To: abb

“Another great day in United States military history.”

Indeed. A good day to remember that our nuclear forces are essential and in need of modernization.

Nothing in history has been a force for peace to equal the nuclear weapon.


12 posted on 08/09/2008 4:35:10 AM PDT by PreciousLiberty
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To: abb

Thanks again to the makers of the bomb .My dad was in California training for the invasion of mainland Japan when the bomb was dropped. Good chance I probably wouldn’t be writing this if it hadn’t happened !
“ Made in America, Tested in Japan !”


13 posted on 08/09/2008 4:38:57 AM PDT by Renegade (You go tell my buddies)
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To: abb
“What’s up, Hiroshi? Let’s light this candle!”
14 posted on 08/09/2008 4:39:21 AM PDT by RichInOC (No! BAD Rich! (What'd I say?))
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To: libertylover
" ended WWII and alleviating the need to invade the island of Japan which would have cost hundreds of thousands of American lives.
I've seen numerous interviews of men who were readying to invade the main island and they were overjoyed at the news. Prior to that, they ALL considered themselves as "dead men walking"."

My late father, at that time a Marine private who helped to take Okinawa, was one such man. He lived to the age of 77 instead of being killed in the invasion of the Japanese Home Islands.

15 posted on 08/09/2008 4:47:20 AM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet (Barack Obama: In Error and arrogant -- he's errogant!)
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To: A.A. Cunningham

Oh dear, The Lord must have been watching over my Mother - She was an Eleven Year old young child, her hometown was Fukuoka, Japan. She remembers, still vividly and Sixty-Three Years later the flash of bright sunlight one morning, it was the second Atomic Bomb dropping of Nagasaki. Fate, brought her many years later to my Late Father, an American, who served proudly in the United States Army. My Mother still says to this day that the bomb saved alot of lives and that the Japanese would have never surrendered but to describe this event as Happy? I think the word: Happy would be appropriate when the Japanese unconditionally surrendered to General Douglas MacArthur./Just Asking - seoul62.......


16 posted on 08/09/2008 4:54:12 AM PDT by seoul62
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To: libertylover

My father considered every day of his life after d-day (Sept. 20?) as a gift from heaven. There turned out to be 60 years worth of days to be grateful for. He had done that beachhead thing three times and was already a fugitive from the law of averages. Also he was in an independent tank battalion, and they always got the dirty end of the stick.


17 posted on 08/09/2008 5:10:45 AM PDT by magslinger (A politician who thinks he is above the law is actually beneath contempt.)
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To: TalBlack
Absolutely true, but that “Happy Nagasaki day” jibe in the headline is childish.

Not really. It's quite on point - the day should be celebrated at least as prominently as Dec. 7. It caused WWII to come to an end.

18 posted on 08/09/2008 5:17:19 AM PDT by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
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To: abb
"The hills that surrounded the city did a better job of containing the destructive force, but the number killed is estimated at anywhere between 60,000 and 80,000 (exact figures are impossible, the blast having obliterated bodies and disintegrated records)."

And of course, this is what the anti American- anti nuke crowd will be wailing over during all the tearful candlelight vigils held tonight.

What they can't seem to get through their heads is that had the war continued, 10 times that number would have been killed by the Japanese imperial army alone in their occupied zones.

19 posted on 08/09/2008 5:24:20 AM PDT by Nathan Zachary
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To: Renegade

My dad had recovered from burns suffered in a crash in the CBI Campaign. He was sure that his number would be called again.


20 posted on 08/09/2008 5:24:46 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks
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It should be Happy Fatman day!


21 posted on 08/09/2008 5:25:56 AM PDT by Nathan Zachary
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To: abb

I wonder if any of those 60-80k people were non-cambatants?


22 posted on 08/09/2008 5:26:36 AM PDT by stuartcr (Election year.....Who we gonna hate, in '08?)
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To: abb

I understand that on a good day down town, you can still smell fried sushi.


23 posted on 08/09/2008 5:29:19 AM PDT by BigCinBigD (")
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To: stuartcr
Of all the secondary targets to pick, Nagasaki was the center of Japan's largest Christian community.

Allied POW's will tell you of their Japanese-Christian guard's life-saving favors when nobody was looking.

24 posted on 08/09/2008 5:33:41 AM PDT by Does so (...against all enemies, DOMESTIC and foreign...)
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To: abb
Truly an historic day. Thank God we had the will to use this weapon; countless lives were spared because of it.

Should also serve as a reminder and warning to enemies of the United States...

25 posted on 08/09/2008 5:34:02 AM PDT by Kolb (Use wisely your power of choice)
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To: stuartcr

I seriously doubt the accuracy of that number.

Fat man was dropped purposely on the industrial area where there would be as few civilian casualties as possible. The plan was to take out Japans aircraft and ship building capability.


26 posted on 08/09/2008 5:36:14 AM PDT by Nathan Zachary
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To: abb
Not really. It's quite on point - the day should be celebrated at least as prominently as Dec. 7. It caused WWII to come to an end.

Do you celebrate Dec 7? Really? How?

27 posted on 08/09/2008 5:37:21 AM PDT by dmz
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To: Does so
"Of all the secondary targets to pick, Nagasaki was the center of Japan's largest Christian community."

Where did you hear that? It was an industrial area

28 posted on 08/09/2008 5:38:40 AM PDT by Nathan Zachary
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To: abb
“Not really. It's quite on point “

Exactly, as an (understandable) reaction to the America haters constant assertion that the bombs were unjustified. I'd probably say it myself if someone pissed me off enough.

One of the first surprises I got as a young adult was that the WWII generation (our parents) were NOT the war-happy yahoos that the Boomers portrayed them to be. As I got into History written at the time of the war and after I was struck at the sadness and horror “of the waste” expressed by the very Americans fighting it.

To be sure, many a man has raised his glass to the bombing that saved his own skin but I doubt too many of them, based upon their own testimony, would have seen anything happy about it.

29 posted on 08/09/2008 5:39:31 AM PDT by TalBlack
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To: Nathan Zachary

That’s why I asked. It’s always interesting to hear how if it’s the good guys doing the killing, civilian and non-cambatants casualties are acceptable...but if it’s the bad guys killing good civilians and non-combatants, it’s heinous.


30 posted on 08/09/2008 5:40:39 AM PDT by stuartcr (Election year.....Who we gonna hate, in '08?)
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To: abb
Absolutely!!! my Father and his Brother were already in the pacific(Dad on a ship my Uncle in the CB's)and my mothers two Brothers(both in the 82'nd) were on their way over.
31 posted on 08/09/2008 5:48:03 AM PDT by Chode (American Hedonist -CTHULHU/NYARLATHOTEP'08 = Nothing LESS!!!)
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To: stuartcr

Moral equivalence??


32 posted on 08/09/2008 6:00:24 AM PDT by Misterioso
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To: abb

.....”Frederick Bock, took off from Tinian Island under the command of Maj. Charles W. Sweeney. Nagasaki was a shipbuilding center, the very industry intended for destruction.....”

Wans’t Kokura the target? But due to bad weather they diverted to their secondary target Nagasaki. Am I wrong?


33 posted on 08/09/2008 6:10:07 AM PDT by Cripplehawk
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To: Misterioso

Sounds like that to me. I don’t see why so many people are so against moral relativism...it’s all through history.


34 posted on 08/09/2008 6:14:01 AM PDT by stuartcr (Election year.....Who we gonna hate, in '08?)
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To: LibLieSlayer
From what I heard, the stench of rotting flesh of burned babies who were in piles down by the epicenter was around for weeks after the blast--at least from what I read. People who went in there afterwards including US military G-2 photographers, vomited en-masse. I saw an TV interview of a former US Army veteran, the guy must have been around 87 or so, he took lots of photos, made it to the evac centers, hospitals, schools, etc. The guy started crying in the interview, 63 years later, he said he still had nightmares. Looked like severe PTSD to me, at least (I'm not an expert).

Yeah "baby". "Happy Nagasaki" day to you, too.

35 posted on 08/09/2008 6:19:07 AM PDT by AmericanInTokyo (Men Who Died in Wars For Our Voting Rights Also Did So For The Right To Vote Indie-Conservative?)
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To: AmericanInTokyo

Agreed. Thoroughly bad taste. I’m sure the Japanese were a hated enemy, and I’m glad the war was ended quickly with a fraction of the lives lost than had we invaded...but, to celebrate joyfully at the incineration of tens of thousands of non-combatants is pretty disgusting. As much as I hate the hajis, even I wouldn’t go dancing a jig if Baghdad got nuked. People need to have a little more respect.


36 posted on 08/09/2008 6:27:35 AM PDT by Future Snake Eater (How 'bout a magic trick? I'm gonna make this pencil disappear...Ta-dah!)
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To: abb
I agree with talblack. The bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki may have been necessary to save American lives, knock Japan out of the war--with an unconditional surrender, demonstrate our atom bomb capabilities to Stalin, and usher in a period of relative peace known as "the nuclear stalemate” but a celebration of the loss of so many innocent noncombatant Japanese citizens is unseemly.

As compassionate Americans, we don't have to rejoice in the deaths of others and the destruction of their cities to prove to ourselves that we were right. We don't believe in collective punishment of this kind, do we? Moreover, I hope we have not set a terrible precedent that may came back to haunt us.

.

37 posted on 08/09/2008 6:31:38 AM PDT by OESY
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To: Future Snake Eater
There is a good book out by an eyewitness. I recommend it.

He could get eyewitness accounts of the cruelty of Japanese military towards Allied POWs near Nagasaki that were liberated, the guy also could document the immense CIVILIAN tragedy (casulties and radiation disease) that were the aftermath of the Naga bomb as well. Ending the war is worth celebration; gloating over massive civilian deaths in the process, however, is barbaric and is not American.

Chicago Daily News reporter George Weller broke all the rules when he went into Nagasaki about four weeks after it had been blasted by the second atomic bomb dropped on Japan. He escaped his military escort, rode a still-running Japanese train, and pretended to be an American army officer. The ruse worked to the point that he obtained official Japanese cooperation, but his on-the spot reports were snagged by General MacArthur's censors and destroyed. The carbons from his typewriter were found in 2003. First into Nagasaki is the first publication of most of the stories from his months in and around Japan in the fall of 1945. Why were Weller's reports suppressed? His accounts were not sensational. In fact, the military accounts of destruction and loss of life were higher, and most of his pieces dealt with soldiers and civilians who had been Japanese prisoners of war. In a memoir that he wrote later (also in this book), he surmised that MacArthur and his staff wanted full control of the story, which the reporter threatened. The prisoner of war stories are more interesting than the Nagasaki story, which is as much about Weller's adventure as about the military event. The reporter spoke with hundreds of service men who had spent years in brutally hard work camps, often recording their own words. First Into Nagasaki should have an index so the descendants of these men could more easily find their stories.

38 posted on 08/09/2008 6:39:19 AM PDT by AmericanInTokyo (Men Who Died in Wars For Our Voting Rights Also Did So For The Right To Vote Indie-Conservative?)
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To: Renegade

My Dad was waiting to ship out with his infantry battalion to the Pacific theater when the bombs were dropped. I’m here for that reason.

We were stationed in Yokohama 1956-58. I was in the third grade and played baseball with Japanese kids. Subject of war never came up.

Heck, at the time I thought WWII only involved the Nazis!

But yeah, we shouldn’t lightly celebrate August 9th. Just observe with sad solemnity that the murderous Japanese warlord regime made such an enormous act unfortunately necessary.


39 posted on 08/09/2008 6:44:03 AM PDT by elcid1970 (My cartridges are dipped in pig grease)
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To: Nathan Zachary
That is a historical fact.

It was the site of Urakami Cathedral or St. Mary's Cathedral built by the Kakure Kirishitan or "Hidden Christians".

40 posted on 08/09/2008 6:46:08 AM PDT by usmcobra (I sing Karaoke the way it was meant to be sung, drunk, badly and in Japanese)
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To: usmcobra

I have stood on the exact spot and in that rebuilt church.


41 posted on 08/09/2008 6:50:14 AM PDT by AmericanInTokyo (Men Who Died in Wars For Our Voting Rights Also Did So For The Right To Vote Indie-Conservative?)
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To: Nathan Zachary
"Of all the secondary targets to pick, Nagasaki was the center of Japan's largest Christian community."

Where did you hear that? It was an industrial area

Probably here at FR; however, Amazon books gets a great many references from Google, and here are two others:

http://www.americancatholic.org/Features/WWII/feature0283.asp

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1141/is_35_41/ai_n15341010

Another footnote:

"...Survivors from the Catholic community--the bomb had fallen on Nagasaki's Catholic district and cathedral--..."

42 posted on 08/09/2008 6:54:11 AM PDT by Does so (...against all enemies, DOMESTIC and foreign...)
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To: WorkingClassFilth
These anniversaries should be noted in every public school...

Yeah, but what would be taught would be how evil the US was to use such a terrible weapon on civilians, with no mention of the millions of lives that were saved.

43 posted on 08/09/2008 6:54:45 AM PDT by Fresh Wind (Five Year Plans and New Deals, wrapped in golden chains...)
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To: Does so
Nagasaki had and probably does have one of the largest concentrations of CHRISTIANS in all of Japan. That IS a fact.

In fact, Christianity was sealed in Nagasaki in the blood of martyrs. On a hill not far from the epicenter of the blast of Nagasaki, is a hill where about 20 Japanese were crucified on orders of Tokugawa (the Shogun at the time) for not renouncing Christianity. In that group, were little Japanese children, too, each nailed to their own smaller crosses overlooking the city.

44 posted on 08/09/2008 7:03:57 AM PDT by AmericanInTokyo (Men Who Died in Wars For Our Voting Rights Also Did So For The Right To Vote Indie-Conservative?)
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To: dmz

Some people have absolutely no class, even freepers.


45 posted on 08/09/2008 7:03:59 AM PDT by stuartcr (Election year.....Who we gonna hate, in '08?)
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To: AmericanInTokyo
Twenty-six Franciscan and Jesuit missionaries and Japanese converts crucified together by order of Toyotomi Hideyoshi. Following their arrests, they were taken to the public square of Meako to the city's principal temple. They each had a piece of their left ear cut off, and then paraded from city to city for weeks with a man shouting their crimes and encouraging their abuse. The priests and brothers were accused of preaching the outlawed faith of Christianity, the laity of supporting and aiding them. They were each repeatedly offered freedom if they would renounce Christianity. They each declined.

1597. Although I had the shogunate wrong. It was Toyotomi who ordered this.

46 posted on 08/09/2008 7:13:30 AM PDT by AmericanInTokyo (Men Who Died in Wars For Our Voting Rights Also Did So For The Right To Vote Indie-Conservative?)
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To: AmericanInTokyo

I am as always envious of your travels in Japan.

On this day still no one recognizes that the Japanese lives saved by the bomb were in the Millions.

And that their losses could have been on a scale of ten to every one of ours had we invaded.

As cruel as it was the reality of what might have been if Operation Olympus had proceeded is lost on many. The planners at the time were estimating 300,000 to 700,000 allied casualties—and up to 2,000,000 Japanese casualties for the first phase of the operation.

Imagine a world where “Made in Japan” didn’t happen.


47 posted on 08/09/2008 7:15:53 AM PDT by usmcobra (I sing Karaoke the way it was meant to be sung, drunk, badly and in Japanese)
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To: johnny7

My dad would have been a new infantry draftee private in Coronet and/or Olympic. Against fierce Japanese resistance, he might not have made it. The atom bomb probably made me possible.


48 posted on 08/09/2008 7:16:59 AM PDT by GAB-1955 (Kicking and Screaming into the Kingdom of Heaven!)
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To: AmericanInTokyo
My Uncle said the same things about his AMERICAN FRIENDS that were killed and were beyond immediate retrieval by our forces... on Iwo... so HAPPY NAGASAKI DAY TO YOU TOO!

LLS

49 posted on 08/09/2008 7:21:02 AM PDT by LibLieSlayer ( press)
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To: AmericanInTokyo
Ending the war is worth celebration; gloating over massive civilian deaths in the process, however, is barbaric and is not American.

Derserves to be repeated.

Every war has developed newer technologies to kill people. Nuclear weapons are too indescriminate to use in populous nations.

The fact so many here gloat over the deaths of thousands of innocents should be reviled. It makes you look like the jihadists that celebrated when the Twin Towers fell.

Was the dropping necessary? It saved American lives. The bomb had been developed, it would be used. EVERY weapon developed gets used, especially in a time of war.

50 posted on 08/09/2008 7:25:43 AM PDT by Pistolshot (Leadership without experience is dangerous. - Lindsey Graham NO B.O.)
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