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Rural Economic Woes May Provide Opening for Obama (People in Fly-Over States Aren't Stupid)
Madistan.com ^ | August 17, 2008 | Staff Writer

Posted on 08/17/2008 3:55:49 PM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin

BELLEVILLE, Pa. -- The folks in this picturesque mountain community with red barns and Amish buggies have been voting overwhelmingly Republican in national elections for decades.

But tough economic times in Mifflin County and in rural areas all around the country have created possible openings for Democrat Barack Obama.

President Bush won nearly 70 percent of the county's vote in both 2000 and 2004, but the standard of living here has declined steadily during his administration.

The farm equipment factory that employed 500 workers here is closing. So is the milk plant. Farmers are facing skyrocketing feed and fertilizer costs, and gas prices are squeezing household budgets of those who now have to drive elsewhere for work.

Nationally, Bush won almost 60 percent of the rural vote, but Republican John McCain doesn't appear to be doing as well.

In an AP-Yahoo News Poll in June, rural voters favored McCain over Obama, 40 percent to 34 percent. About 34 percent of rural voters said McCain "shares my values," compared to 27 percent who said Obama did.

Recognizing an opportunity, Obama has opened more offices in rural areas than any other Democratic presidential candidate in years, pushing a message focused on job creation. Neighborhood campaign teams have been going door to door talking about Obama and his economic policies. In Ohio, his campaign recently announced a "Barns for Obama" effort, in which farmers are encouraged to paint their barn with Obama's logo.

Economy is hardly the only issue, here as elsewhere.

Religion and race are still powerful forces in rural America, and whether Obama can gain ground in traditional rural safe havens for Republicans could hinge on whether voters focus more on economic issues or cultural values when they go to the polls. Likability is also likely to be a strong factor.

Republican Barbara Dettloff, 72, a retired bartender from Racine, Ohio, an Appalachian river town with about 750 people, voted for Bush in 2004 and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney in this year's Republican primary. She's voting for Obama in November because "I think he's nice and I think he's sincere in what he says."

But, she added, "I'm probably the only person in this town that does."

Indeed, many of her friends have told her they're either not voting for Obama or are staying home. "They just won't vote for him because he's black," Dettloff said.

Some other rural voters like Carol Fuller, 45, of Lewistown, blame the Republican Party for their economic troubles but aren't ready to switch to a Democrat like Obama.

At the Belleville auction house on a recent day, Fuller described the future as "bleak." In part because of gas prices, she said she and her husband are living month to month on the farm where they raise poultry and cattle.

She accused the Republican Party of price gouging at the pump, mismanaging the Iraq war and failing to address health care. She said she would have voted for Democratic Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton because she thought a woman could clean up Washington, but, as for Obama, "I just don't like him." She plans to vote for McCain.

Another farmer, Robert Thompson, 58, a Democrat and retired state worker from Millheim who raises cattle and hogs, said he still hasn't gotten over Obama's comments at a private San Francisco fundraiser that small-town voters in Pennsylvania are bitter and "cling to guns or religion." He said he's considering not voting for president because he doesn't like McCain, either.

If many rural voters follow the route Thompson is considering, it could hurt McCain in critical swing states, said Terry Madonna, a pollster and professor at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster.

"McCain will have problems getting a high turnout among those voters unless he finds some way to identify with them, some way to make them think that, A, he's not connected to Bush, and B, his economic plan is superior to Obama's," Madonna said.

He also needs to turn the conversation away from the economy, Madonna said, but "it's tougher to do that when times are bad."

Paul Lindsay, a McCain spokesman, said long-standing relationships Republicans have established in rural areas will pay off for McCain.

"John McCain continues to hear the concerns of rural families. ... That's why he has made every effort to engage these voters on his plans to create jobs and provide relief for working families," Lindsay said.

Says Dan Leistikow, an Obama spokesman: "We're getting a great response in rural communities that have been ignored by Washington and left behind in the Bush economy."

Mifflin is one of nearly 150 rural counties where the median household income has dropped by more than 10 percent since 1999, more than three times the national decline, according to an analysis by The Associated Press.

That could make a difference in traditionally Republican rural areas come November. In Ohio in 2004, for example, John Kerry might have won the state and the presidency had he won just 45 percent of the rural vote. As it was, Bush carried Ohio's rural voters by an almost 2-to-1 margin, according to exit polls.

Rural voters accounted for more than 10 percent of the total vote in all but three of 12 closely contested battleground states in 2004, and more than 20 percent in four of them — Iowa, Minnesota, New Hampshire and Wisconsin — according to exit polls. In all but two of the states, Bush won the small-town vote overwhelmingly.

The AP analysis of median household income was based on 2005 estimates, the latest available from the Census Bureau. In some of the rural counties heavily dependent on farming, income may well have rebounded since then, as rising soybean and corn prices have helped offset feed and fertilizer costs.

And not all rural counties are hurting. The median household income improved during the Bush administration in many rural counties near metropolitan areas.

But for counties like Mifflin, the recent economic decline is just a continuation of a trend that's lasted decades. Some of the county's economic woes date to 1972 when rains from Hurricane Agnes flooded parts of the area, including a profitable rayon fiber plant that was a major employer.

Tara Davidson, 36, a single mother and hair dresser from nearby Unionville, said she worries about what opportunities will be available for her 15-year-old son, who is already working to help out with their expenses. But she's not sure she'll even vote in November.

"I'm considering it, but I don't want any of them," Davidson said. "What if they get in there and make it worse?"


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Politics/Elections; US: Pennsylvania
KEYWORDS: bitter; economy; electionpresident; obama; pa2008; propagandawingofdnc; ruralvote; wishfulthinking
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Oh, Brother.
1 posted on 08/17/2008 3:55:50 PM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin
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To: Diana in Wisconsin
Rural Economic Woes May Provide Opening for Obama

What else is new? Socialists, Communists, and Tyrants always exploit the disadvantaged to their own ends.

2 posted on 08/17/2008 3:59:18 PM PDT by Jim 0216
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To: Diana in Wisconsin

The author is just “staff writer?” Why the anonymity? Maybe because if he lists his actual name, his inbox will instantly become deluged with requests for where to buy that awesome crack he’s smoking?


3 posted on 08/17/2008 4:00:44 PM PDT by library user
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To: Diana in Wisconsin
Did they give up their religion and guns already?
4 posted on 08/17/2008 4:00:47 PM PDT by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: Diana in Wisconsin

McCain needs to start talking creativity, entrepreneurship, social capital, social entrepreneurship, community, etc, etc, etc. It’s like he is stuck in the past. There is so much opportunity to leverage technology to structure society so it’s more tuned to conservative values but they’re not even engaging in that sphere. Obama is kicking there ass there. They need to stop calling him an empty suit and reverse engineer and refactor his policies so that the same outcomes can be gotten out of the private sphere.


5 posted on 08/17/2008 4:01:12 PM PDT by bahblahbah
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To: 2banana

Not in my neck of the woods. ;)


6 posted on 08/17/2008 4:01:46 PM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
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To: All

“We’re getting a great response in rural communities that have been ignored by Washington and left behind in the Bush economy.”

I, for one, am greatly RELIEVED that Washington has basically “left me alone” and “ignored” me for the past eight years. President Bush’s tax cuts have put thousands of dollars back into my pocketbook and out of the hands of Government, not to mention two awesome SCOTUS appointments. :)


7 posted on 08/17/2008 4:06:35 PM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
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To: Diana in Wisconsin

Same here. ;-)

My soon-to-be 15 year old daughter fired a gun for the first time today. It was just a little .22 but her words to describe it: “cool!” and “sweet! No recoil!”

She doesn’t sound bitter to me.


8 posted on 08/17/2008 4:06:56 PM PDT by Kieri (The Conservatrarian)
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To: library user

Probably because he’s such a blatant Obama plant that his name would be instantly recognizable.


9 posted on 08/17/2008 4:09:13 PM PDT by livius
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To: Diana in Wisconsin

As if. As if red state residents will be fooled into thinking things would be BETTER under Osama van Krushev than under Juan McCain. No, they’ll hold their noses and vote for McCain. Or not, and vote 3rd party, allowing Osama to win. But no, they won’t pull the lever for Osama. NOT going to happen.


10 posted on 08/17/2008 4:17:16 PM PDT by Freedom_Is_Not_Free
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To: Diana in Wisconsin

Most of the people out here are ranchers and farmers, and they all say they’re going for McCain. This is the Left Coast, Barack Hussein Obama has no chance of winning the rural hick vote anywhere.

He’ll do well in San Francisco, though.


11 posted on 08/17/2008 4:21:15 PM PDT by Baladas ((ABBHO))
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To: Diana in Wisconsin

Thing is, Osama is going to win because a lot of furious conservatives are going to sit out the election or write in Ron Paul or some other jackass who has NO chance to beat Osama, instead of just wrinkling up the nose, biting a bullet and somehow forcing themselves to vote for Juan McCain, like I am going to FORCE myself to do.

Won’t matter. Osama is a lock due to all the conservatives who refuse to vote for McCain. A lock. No libbies are going to vote for McCain. He was just selected by the DNC to hedge their bet incase someone with an “R” behind their name happened to win.

Heads, they win. Tails, they don’t lose. What a scam. And it is all planned in advance, just like Michael Savage says it is. 4 years of Bush. 8 years of Clinton. 8 years of Bush. 8 more years of Clinton, or in this case, Osama. The beat goes on and we get screwed.


12 posted on 08/17/2008 4:21:42 PM PDT by Freedom_Is_Not_Free
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To: Diana in Wisconsin

“Indeed, many of her friends have told her they’re either not voting for Obama or are staying home. “They just won’t vote for him because he’s black,” Dettloff said.”

How long did it take to find someone to say this?


13 posted on 08/17/2008 4:24:05 PM PDT by autumnraine
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To: Diana in Wisconsin

America is so screwed.

What if we just declare the Oval Office vacant for the next four years, until this blame thing gets sorted out?


14 posted on 08/17/2008 4:24:11 PM PDT by alloysteel (Are Democrats truly "better angels"? They are lousy stewards for America.)
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To: Diana in Wisconsin

It is NOT the job of the government to create jobs, but rather provide for an environment conducive to the private sector creating the jobs, i.e. less regulation and taxation. THAT is how jobs are created.


15 posted on 08/17/2008 4:32:44 PM PDT by Gabz (You said WHAT?????????)
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To: Freedom_Is_Not_Free

This conservative is voting for McCain. I’ve got some heavy-duty clothespins at my disposal.

Michael Savage, really? I haven’t listened to that dude since 2002. He’s off his rocker.


16 posted on 08/17/2008 4:34:07 PM PDT by mplsconservative
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To: Diana in Wisconsin
She's voting for Obama in November because "I think he's nice and I think he's sincere in what he says."

Pay no attention to his "sincere" desire to raise your taxes, weaken the nation's defense, spend you into poverty and provide wretched, untimely but "free" health care for all. It's the "nice" and "sincere" that count.

17 posted on 08/17/2008 4:52:27 PM PDT by catpuppy
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To: mplsconservative

Did you watch the Rick Warren forum last night?


18 posted on 08/17/2008 5:17:01 PM PDT by nobama08
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To: nobama08

Yes. I did. McCain cleaned Obama’s clock.


19 posted on 08/17/2008 5:21:28 PM PDT by mplsconservative
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To: mplsconservative

Yes he did. I have not been enthusiastic about McCain, but I must say I was very impressed with him last night and feel much more comfortable voting for him now. He has so much life experience that Nobama will never have and it showed. It was a great forum. My pastor, who I have never heard say anything political from the pulpit, this morning told the congregation that if they got a chance to watch a re-broadcast, that they should as it was very informative and unbiased, which you don’t get in the “debates”. He didn’t say anything else and he has never told anyone how to vote. My guess is he was impressed with McCain as well.


20 posted on 08/17/2008 5:26:34 PM PDT by nobama08
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