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The purpose of the 9/11 attacks was not to kill people.

It was to instill a sense of fear in Americans, and cause us to change our ways out of fear.

That's what to "terrorize" means.

America is, in fact, terrorized.

1 posted on 09/12/2008 5:18:10 AM PDT by Notary Sojac
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To: Notary Sojac

Firefighters have all sorts of tools on board. Designate a spot for the hydrant-turner-on-wrench, possibly even next to the hydrant-uncapper-wrench. Done and done.


2 posted on 09/12/2008 5:22:58 AM PDT by BobbyT
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To: Notary Sojac
Here's another one:

OREM, Utah (ABC 4 News) - A startled homeowner got a visit from Orem Police Tuesday afternoon. They were interested in a plant that he was growing by his mailbox in the front yard. They were so interested that they put a call into Homeland Security. No, it wasn’t marijuana. It was a castor bean plant.

Castor beans themselves are poisonous and are used in the manufacture of the super-deadly poison, Ricin. They are also used to make something as innocent as castor oil.

Lincoln Fuqua is a master gardener who grew a castor bean plant in his front yard for nostalgia. Born and raised in Kentucky, he was surrounded by castor bean plants. Fuqua remembers, “I used to chew on them as a kid.”

And when he saw the castor bean seeds this spring at his favorite nursery in Orem, he remembers snapping some up and thinking, “Hey, I’m going to grow some this year because they’re beautiful.”

Fuqua has a background in chemistry and is well aware that terrorists have used them to make Ricin. But he never dreamed that someone would think that he might be a terrorist.

He says with a laugh, “I’m not a terrorist, but I was terribly frightened when the call came in. I was terrorized (for) my humble little plant that’s over there in the corner.”

Orem police have not given us their verdict on the castor bean plant, but it is not illegal. In fact, only the District of Columbia “strongly discourages” the sale of castor bean seeds. And ABC 4 could not find any contemporary effort to either restrict or ban the plant.

The madrassas remain open for business, but by golly we are nailing those terrorist gardeners!

4 posted on 09/12/2008 5:28:48 AM PDT by Notary Sojac (America's never won a "war" unless the enemy was named using a proper noun.)
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To: Notary Sojac

Our hydrants are off all the time. Spin the caps off and nothing comes out.

You need the large wrench to turn it on. Everybody here seems to know that. The Public Works people even have a wrench in the truck so they can flush lines.

Open that line and you ain’t getting anything in. Too much water pressure.


5 posted on 09/12/2008 5:31:35 AM PDT by PeteB570 (NRA - Life member and Black Rifle owner)
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To: Notary Sojac
You may have noticed the fire hydrants along Aderholt's street are black, not red.

In Texas, that legally warns firefighters they may not function - private companies such as Cash Water are not required to maintain enough water pressure to fight fires.

They maintain the hydrants are technically only there to help flush out and clean their systems.

Funny, I thought that a fire hydrant was actually supposed to be used to provide water to fire fighters so they could . . . . . . well, put out fires. Of course, the name "fire hydrant" sounds a lot snazzier than "system flusher outer thingy".

Sarcasm aside, this is bureaucratic BS. The city is apparently siphoning the funds off for maintaining the fire hydrants and using the money elsewhere. Terrorism just makes a good cover story. Were I the homeowner and/or the HOA, the city would be facing a lawsuit over this. If they are going to use terrorism and safety as a cover story, it works both ways. Benjamin Franklin developed the Fire Department system as a safety issue for the public and to try to prevent fires from devastating neighborhoods.

7 posted on 09/12/2008 5:36:44 AM PDT by DustyMoment (FloriDUH - proud inventors of pregnant/hanging chads and judicide!!)
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To: Notary Sojac
"These hydrants need to be cut off in a way to prevent vandalism or any kind of terrorist activity, including something in the water lines,"

Vandalism? Im going to be it's very rare. Putting something in the water line? Ok, imagine trying to put something in when 50-70 psi of water is forcing it's way out.

8 posted on 09/12/2008 5:42:11 AM PDT by Realism (Some believe that the facts-of-life are open to debate.....)
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To: Notary Sojac
Something about this story don't seem exactly right. First hydrants are always physically connected to the water main through a hydrant riser. The valve that opens water to the hydrant is just above the water main and connected to the hydrant by a rod running up through the riser to a five sided nut on the top of the hydrant. A special hydrant wrench is used to turn the nut and open the valve.

I could see where the responding fire department might not have the correct wrench for the hydrant, but that the hydrant was disconnected from the water supply seems incorrect.

10 posted on 09/12/2008 5:50:29 AM PDT by The Great RJ ("Mir we bleiwen wat mir sin" or "We want to remain what we are." ..Luxembourg motto)
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To: Notary Sojac

Does the insurance company know about the hydrants? When providing homeowners insurance they want to know how far away the nearest fire hydrant is.


11 posted on 09/12/2008 5:52:10 AM PDT by eccentric (a.k.a. baldwidow)
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To: Notary Sojac
This is stupid. What do you water and sewer rates, not to mention local taxes, pay for?

Any reasonable person is going to think that a fire hydrant is going to be usable for, well, fighting fires. Why even bother putting these props up if they aren't going to be useful for anything?

12 posted on 09/12/2008 5:56:53 AM PDT by pnh102 (Save America - Ban Ethanol Now!)
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To: Notary Sojac

Black hydrant is a dead hydrant. This sounds like a private water company has a well that serves the rural subdivision, with both potable water and they have a hydrant loop that is separate. That is normally not the case. The theory is that someone is supposed to know where the valve is and yurn it on in case of a working fire.

The plan was not well thought out or planned. Unless they brought a tanker in they ran out of water quickly.

On the engine I drive, I can empty the tank in 1-2 minutes depending on which line we pull. Best case is one hand line that lasts 4-5 minutes.

In everything except the hottest climates, we use a dry hydrant. You take the cap off, attach your line and turn it on with a special wrench.

I have flushed bottles, cans, toys, and rocks out while testing hydrants.


13 posted on 09/12/2008 6:07:01 AM PDT by Clay Moore ("Bro, face it. You (print media) guys are the 8-track cassette of news")
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To: Notary Sojac

Of course all hydrants are off right at the hydrant. Imagine unscrewing the cap and trying to hook up a hose with a 3-4” stream of high pressure water coming out.

This sounds as if there is another valve between the hydrant and the water main. If so, there must be access of some kind in a valve box in the street. Otherwise, how would the water company turn it off?

“Warning! This fire hydrant must not be used to put out fires!”


14 posted on 09/12/2008 6:08:27 AM PDT by Right Wing Assault ("..this administration is planning a 'Right Wing Assault' on values and ideals.." - John Kerry)
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To: Notary Sojac
private companies such as Cash Water are not required to maintain enough water pressure to fight fires.

Maybe they SHOULD be required.

They maintain the hydrants are technically only there to help flush out and clean their systems.

But I imagine the executives make sure there is one near their houses.

15 posted on 09/12/2008 6:11:29 AM PDT by Right Wing Assault ("..this administration is planning a 'Right Wing Assault' on values and ideals.." - John Kerry)
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To: Notary Sojac

“They maintain the hydrants are technically only there to help flush out and clean their systems.”

Someone doesn’t know the difference between a fire hydrant and a flushing hydrant. Fire hydrants can be used to flush the lines. But flushing hydrants are much smaller in size and located at the end of a water line.


16 posted on 09/12/2008 6:19:08 AM PDT by caver (Yes, I did crawl out of a hole in the ground.)
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To: Notary Sojac
...something a trade association spokesman tells us is common practice for rural systems.

Not in rural Michigan. One of the great joys of summer is when the volunteer fire crews make their monthly rounds of hydrants, turning them on, checking their flow, then on to the next one. Nearly all of the town kids follow the crew around. It's an impromptu water parade.

18 posted on 09/12/2008 6:32:30 AM PDT by grellis (SISTERHOOD OF SARAH God. Guns. Hockey.)
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To: Notary Sojac

The homeowner’s insurance company will be suing the local fire dept to reimburse them for the majority of the replacement cost they will have to pay out to the homeowner.


19 posted on 09/12/2008 6:34:24 AM PDT by webschooner (McWhatshisname/Palin 2008 !!)
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To: Notary Sojac

22 posted on 09/12/2008 8:10:20 AM PDT by Old Professer (The critic writes with rapier pen, dips it twice, and writes again.)
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