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The World in Crisis: Where are the Safe Havens?
Merk Insights ^ | Axel Merk, October 7, 2008 | Axel Merk

Posted on 10/07/2008 1:20:04 PM PDT by 2banana

The World in Crisis: Where are the Safe Havens? Axel Merk, October 7, 2008

Merk Insights provide the Merk Perspective on currencies, global imbalances, the trade deficit, the socio-economic impact of the U.S. administration's policies and more.

We have been warning for some time that “there is no such thing as a safe asset anymore, you have to take a diversified approach to something as mundane as cash.” Unfortunately, the current crisis shows that we may be right. Physical gold is attractive to many investors because of its lack of counter party risk. The only counter party risk with gold held in your personal vault is that someone may break in and steal it. However, even staunch gold bugs rarely hold all their net worth in gold, but diversify if for no other reason that it is impractical to have essentially all your net worth in gold. And while gold is currently fulfilling its role as sound money, it often trades in tandem with other commodities; this can result in stomach-twisting volatility. As a result, many hold gold as insurance, but few truly live on their personal gold standard.

In late 2006, we forecast the ensuing surge in volatility to unwind the unprecedented credit expansion that had taken place in the previous years (please click here for past Merk Insights). When the crisis first started, we argued that the markets dealt with a valuation, not a liquidity crisis: financial institutions were unwilling to sell off assets on their books out of fear of jeopardizing their capital ratios. By now, the valuation crisis has morphed into a liquidity crisis where financial institutions don’t trust one another; inter-bank lending is grinding to a halt. The business model of most commercial banks consists of borrowing short-term funds to provide long-term loans; if short term funding is not available, central banks step in as the lender of last resort. Consumers, investment banks, large corporations, municipalities and states alike have realized that they do not have a central bank as a lender of last resort; when short-term funding dries up, they may have to file for bankruptcy protection even if they are otherwise financially sound. Quite simply, unless one can afford the risk of not obtaining refinancing, we believe long-term projects ought to be financed with long-term loans.

Accessing the lender of last resort for overnight funding requirements is generally frowned upon. Banks that may need to access the Federal Reserve (Fed) “discount window” or one of its new short-term facilities tend to reign in their lending activities to hoard cash; this is motivated by a desire to rebuild the balance sheet so that at some point reliance on the Fed may no longer be necessary. Similarly, if they were to access the interbank lending market at what is currently a very high rate, they would eventually have to pass on the elevated cost of borrowing to their customers. This makes credit availability “tight”; in a credit driven society, this is bad for economic growth. Hoarding cash to rebuild your balance sheet quickly becomes a habit - just as the Japanese or those who are still around to have experienced the Great Depression. A depression is not merely a severe recession; it is a state of mind.

Because of these concerns, policy makers want to jump start credit markets, especially short-term money markets, at just about any cost. The Fed just announced an increase of its Term Auction Facility (TAF) to over $900 billion; the TAF effectively allows financial institutions to park a broad range of collateral in return for cash with the Fed. The bailout plan approved in Congress tries to be a tool in Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson’s “toolbox”; a coordinated interest rate cut throughout the world may be applied with the same objective. One should not underestimate the will of the Fed to throw money at the problem; at the same time, the Fed has underestimated the markets’ resilience to make that money stick.

So far, efforts by policy makers have been ineffective. It appears that, at least for now, central banks may be losing control of the situation as massive liquidity injections are simply not enough to stabilize the credit markets. Much of it is because, in our assessment, the Federal Reserve has been losing valuable time by employing inefficient policy tools. Amongst them is that the cutting of interest rate had been mostly ineffective while we had a valuation, not a liquidity problem; now as we have a liquidity problem, the Fed has less ammunition. Similarly, the $700 billion bailout approved in Congress may be ineffective if it is not used to improve the capitalization of financial institutions, but merely replaces bad assets with good assets; this move may be helpful, but is not enough. Again, valuable ammunition is wasted should, to name potential challenges ahead, the credit continue to be seized up; should the automotive and airline sectors deteriorate further; should the anger in public increase and the mood in Congress to reach constructive solutions worsen; or should the consumer slide further into recession.

The implications of all of this heavily depend on how governments interfere in the markets. Without interference, only the strongest institutions may survive. That’s why the large U.S. financial institutions, in particular JP Morgan, Bank of America, Citigroup and Wells Fargo have experienced substantial inflows in recent weeks, at the cost of small banks. To stem the flow out of small institutions, Congress has increased FDIC insurance. In Europe the same trend can be observed with HSBC, Europe’s largest bank, experiencing large inflows – despite HSBC’s exposure to the U.S. subprime market through its 2003 acquisition of U.S. based Household International -, but many smaller or weaker institutions experiencing outflows. European governments are scrambling to issue guarantees for depositors to stem the tide; one may take note that many of these guarantees only affect personal, not business accounts. There is the danger that governments may not be strong enough to bail out their financial institutions. Iceland, in particular, has seen not only a flight on its institutions, but also on the currency; as the crisis deepens, there is the real fear that Iceland may become insolvent. For the time being, Iceland is negotiating a loan from Russia and is attempting to peg its currency; as of this writing, it is not sure whether this will work as trading liquidity dried up as a result as the unofficial exchange rate is about half of what the peg would suggest.

As most know by now, not all cash is the same. The U.S. government has taken steps to shore up confidence by, for example, temporarily increasing the insurance on FDIC insured deposits; or providing assurances on money market funds. Still, we have seen brokers transfer units of money market funds rather than cash for intra-broker transfers; this is a legitimate practice, but shows the strains in the money markets. One safe alternative is the purchase of U.S. Treasury Bills; the challenge is that the yield on a 4-week T-Bills is just above zero, possibly negative after commissions. Given the volatility in the current markets, it is possible to lose money if one needs to sell the T-Bills before they mature should they drop in value. Recently, we were unable to buy a 3-month T-Bill because the yield would have been negative. Imagine the strain on money market funds that don’t want to touch any commercial paper, but have to keep a stable net asset value, after expenses. Many Treasury-only money market funds may engage in overnight repurchase agreements; this may allow such money market funds to get sufficient return to keep a stable net asset value after expenses, but it is not what investors in these funds necessarily expect. To some, but certainly not all, it may be reassuring to some that the government provides a backstop to money market funds. Some opt to take the cash and put it under their mattress, literally. In California, everyone is encouraged to keep an emergency pack in case of an earthquake; why not also hold some cash and gold coins just in case the financial system seizes up? Financial institutions are hoarding cash, why shouldn’t you? Please note that this is not investment advice, but food for thought.

How will this play out? In recent days, there has been a flight to cash, U.S. dollar cash. The violent deleveraging has accelerated and the only currencies that have benefited from this are the Japanese yen and the U.S. dollar. The U.S. dollar has returned, at least for the moment, to its safe haven status. This has become a fairly common phenomenon in recent crisis, but did not necessarily last; U.S. investors repatriate foreign investors in times of crisis; as a second wave, they then decide how to deploy them. The challenge with holding U.S. dollar cash is that it is also not without risk because one can never underestimate just how determined the Federal Reserve is to get the credit markets going. Fed Chairman Bernanke has been critical of how the Japanese handled their banking crisis in the 1990s because they Bank of Japan was not forceful enough in pre-empting the crisis. This is part of the reason the Fed and the Treasury were pushing for the $700 billion bailout before the crisis was felt on Main Street. Japan, unlike the U.S., however, does not have significant foreign creditors; the U.S. is crucially dependent on foreigners to support the currency. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were quasi-nationalized after foreigners no longer bought these agency papers, causing a 94.5% drop in foreign investments in the U.S. in the 2nd quarter. Foreign investments have since returned, but foreigners have every right to be nervous on how the Treasury and the Fed steer through the waters. In the latest developments, the Fed has indicated that it will buy commercial paper directly; the initial positive reaction is that this very targeted action does indeed help the commercial paper market; the negative reaction is to the dollar that is reacting negatively.

In the meantime, fears about the European financial sector have increased. Hypo Real Estate, a large German real estate company and DAX listed company, would have collapsed had it not been for a government-orchestrated bailout. A €30 billion rescue package hastily put together collapsed over the weekend when an audit revealed that the short term funding requirements were substantially higher. By Sunday night, a new rescue package was put together. In Europe, not all cash is the same, either. The short-term money markets are seized up, only government securities issued by select Northern European governments are in demand; in Switzerland, for the second week in a row, T-Bills (other countries also issue T-Bills in their domestic currencies) were issued with 0 yield, resulting in a negative yield for any participant that had to pay commissions. In our view, though, the European Central Bank (ECB) has been prudent in not lowering interest rate to date; as of October 6, 2008, short-term rates have remained at 4.25%. This gives the ECB far more ammunition than the Fed to help the crisis. ECB President Trichet has re-iterated many times that they are exclusively focused on price stability and will not lower rates merely because of an economic slowdown. However, because interbank lending rates have soared, the ECB now has substantial leeway. Just as Trichet said in 2004 that monetary policy was not tight because credit was easily available, he can now lower rates without causing inflation because – even with lower rates – access to money is likely to remain relatively tight.

A major driver in all markets, including the currency markets, has been the at times violent unwinding of leveraged positions held by hedge funds. Multi-billion dollar hedge funds need to liquidate positions, partially to meet redemption requests (according to media reports, some of the largest funds had negative returns in excess of 50% in the first three quarters of 2008), partially to reduce counter-party risks. AIG, the bailed out U.S. insurance giant, for example, was the guarantor to many financial instruments, including some London based commodity exchange traded funds (ETFs); in the weeks before AIG’s collapse, in our analysis, hedge funds unwound ‘long inflation’/’short financial’ trades, causing seemingly erratic actions in the market. On Monday, October 6, 2008, the yen surged 4% versus the U.S. dollar while the Australian dollar fell by over 6.5%; such extreme action is a clear indication of an unwinding of the popular ‘carry trade’ where hedge funds had borrowed money cheaply in yen to buy higher yielding currencies, such as the Australian dollar. Volatility is the enemy of the carry trade as leverage of 30:1 or even 100:1 is the norm rather the exception for such trades. A day later, Australia’s central bank has lowered interest rates from 7% to 6%, which further reduces the attractiveness of the carry trade. Another suggestion that hedge fund liquidation is contributing to the volatility is the intra-day rise of the shares of Volkswagen, the German carmaker, of 55% on October 7, 2008; the carmaker did not reinvent the wheel, but a short-squeeze must have caused the massive rally. For the global deleveraging to succeed, we must see this type of action because hedge funds are one type of leveraged player that must be brought to its knees.

In our analysis, we have not seen the end of the crisis; we expect continued volatility in the days, weeks and months to come. While we have been critical of U.S. institutions for not acting fast enough, there is progress. The remaining large financial institutions may be too large to fail; institutions from Bank of America to Citigroup; from Goldman Sachs to General Electric have been swallowing tough medicine to strengthen their respective balance sheets in a market when capital is expensive. In Europe, financial institutions still have a lot of work ahead of them; however, it does look like European governments are waking up to the seriousness of the situation. Without passing judgment whether bailouts should have taken place, European governments have shown both will and ability to act. What makes us more positive about Europe than many is that, ultimately, European economies are less fragile because of – with some regional exceptions - much healthier consumers and less elevated home prices. European governments may also be more willing to nationalize banks or force capital injections to protect the system than U.S. regulators are. Ultimately, it is capital that is missing more than anything; and then there’s the value of homes that triggered all of these – in the U.S., home prices continue to be too expensive, posing further risks to the U.S. economy and the dollar. Finally in Asia, while Japan is ironically shining, the region has yet to see the full impact of weaker sales to the U.S. and potential shocks to their real estate markets.

We don’t have a crystal ball either. But being active in parts of the money markets both domestically and abroad, we are concerned at what we see. There is a significant risk that the U.S. dollar resumes its downward trend. As a result, investors may want to consider diversifying to take this risk into account.

We manage the Merk Hard and Asian Currency Funds, no-load mutual funds seeking to protect against a decline in the dollar by investing in baskets of hard and Asian currencies, respectively. To learn more about the Funds, or to subscribe to our free newsletter, please visit www.merkfund.com. Please also register for our free webinar on October 15, 2008, to get an update on our views on the economy and the markets.

Axel Merk Chief Investment Officer and Manager of the Merk Hard and Asian Currency Funds, www.merkfund.com


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Government
KEYWORDS: crisis; money; safe; world
In the very short term - We are most likely (in America) see a flight to safety of the US dollar and deflation.

Once foreigners figure out we have massively devalued out dollar and are not that good a risk of paying back debt with all this government interference/liabilities - the dollar is going to sink almost overnight followed by much higher interest rates...

But DO your own homework as anything can happen like tomorrow we may bomb Iran and they may close the Straights of Hormuz and oil may go to $300/barrel...

1 posted on 10/07/2008 1:20:05 PM PDT by 2banana
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To: 2banana
Where are the Safe Havens?

Right behind my Kimber 1911 Custom TLE .45

2 posted on 10/07/2008 1:22:12 PM PDT by Puppage (You may disagree with what I have to say, but I shall defend to your death my right to say it)
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To: 2banana

3 posted on 10/07/2008 1:22:25 PM PDT by BGHater (Democracy is the road to socialism.)
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To: 2banana

For the largest safe haven, check out at which door Iceland’s governemtnt is knocking on, before declaring bankrupcy


4 posted on 10/07/2008 1:27:58 PM PDT by VlPu
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To: VlPu
For the largest safe haven, check out at which door Iceland’s governemtnt is knocking on, before declaring bankrupcy

Russia? You kidden me?

5 posted on 10/07/2008 1:29:25 PM PDT by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: 2banana
there has been a flight to cash, U.S. dollar cash

There is only about $1.5T in physical US dollar cash. (And I wonder how much of that is $100 bills sitting in large vaults.)

Everything else in "dollars" is merely leveraged IOUs promising more than there is.

6 posted on 10/07/2008 1:31:35 PM PDT by ctdonath2 (The average piece of junk is more meaningful than our criticism designating it so. - Ratatouille)
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To: 2banana

Texas. Everything grows here, the chances of freezing to death are low, and we could be self-sufficient in the necessities if we had to be.

There is no security in this world. The only safe haven is Our Lord.


7 posted on 10/07/2008 1:33:32 PM PDT by B-Chan (Catholic. Monarchist. Texan. Any questions?)
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To: 2banana

I am the last person in the world that would be kidding about it.


8 posted on 10/07/2008 1:33:42 PM PDT by VlPu
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To: 2banana

I have been here in Slovakia where life has been good for me, but I have to work to supplement my meager SS income.
In event of a worldwide meltdown, I do not want to be stuck in Europe, or even back home in Tennessee if Hussein is elected.

Soon I will relocate to the Philippines.
Yes, it is a third world country, but 1: I will not freeze.
2: I can live OK on 2/3 of my SS payment, and if SS should stop, I can live like most all of the natives, and 3: Best of all, I have a bevy of beautiful young ladies that look at me as God ;)


9 posted on 10/07/2008 1:41:11 PM PDT by AlexW (Reporting from Bratislava, Slovakia. Happy not to be back in the USA for now.)
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To: B-Chan
The only safe haven is Our Lord.

Amen! Isn't it interesting that stamped on our coin of the realm are the words, "In God We Trust." Well it is now nigh time to do so.

10 posted on 10/07/2008 1:44:12 PM PDT by sola gracia
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To: 2banana

There are none. America was the “Last Best Hope.” Both parties seek to destroy that—one quickly, one slowly. They are on the verge of complete victory.


11 posted on 10/07/2008 2:03:07 PM PDT by ModelBreaker
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To: 2banana
Interestingly, the USA could be one place where European and even the Chinese may send their money to. The reason is simple: we are already taking steps to try to minimize the problem, while the problem is just hitting full-force in Europe and China, where their banks are VASTLY more over-leveraged than any US financial institution. Europe is a particular problem because the European Central Bank can't seem to coordinate efforts to minimize their financial problems across all EU countries.
12 posted on 10/07/2008 2:28:34 PM PDT by RayChuang88
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To: B-Chan
Not enough water in Texas for the population. Same with much of the Southwest.

That and you have a potentially hostile nation just south of you. But Texas is a nice place to live (not for me, not enough plants!). And to be honest if the balloon goes up, it won't really matter.

13 posted on 10/07/2008 4:17:21 PM PDT by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: AlexW

What is the trick to #3?


14 posted on 10/07/2008 4:30:31 PM PDT by balls (Never underestimate the stupidity of the American electorate)
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To: balls

“What is the trick to #3?”

You just get online in chat rooms and meet them.
I spent all of August in the Philippines.
I can’t wait to go back...by January, or sooner.


15 posted on 10/07/2008 4:41:03 PM PDT by AlexW (Reporting from Bratislava, Slovakia. Happy not to be back in the USA for now.)
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To: redgolum

There’s plenty of water in Texas for drinking — pure spring water locked away in limestone. The problem is that all those nice, green suburban lawns require water on an industrial scale. Get rid of the water-wasting lawns and there’s water enough for everyone.


16 posted on 10/07/2008 5:25:01 PM PDT by B-Chan (Catholic. Monarchist. Texan. Any questions?)
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To: balls
What is the trick to #3?

$$$$ no matter what the currency.......

17 posted on 10/07/2008 5:35:35 PM PDT by Hot Tabasco (Polar bears who suffer depression and anxiety due to the global warming threat are bi-polar bears)
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To: B-Chan

God Bless Texas! I’m glad I’m here.


18 posted on 10/07/2008 5:37:47 PM PDT by 38special (I mean come on.)
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To: AlexW
You just get online in chat rooms and meet them.

There's more to life than sex.........

I have a friend who retired from my plant who is from the Phillipines and when I last saw him (2 years ago ) he had just returned from there and was going back on vacation a few months later. Sad to say, it was all about the available sex.........

Not quite what I have in mind should I choose to become an ex-pat and move to another country........

19 posted on 10/07/2008 5:40:33 PM PDT by Hot Tabasco (Polar bears who suffer depression and anxiety due to the global warming threat are bi-polar bears)
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To: AlexW
3: Best of all, I have a bevy of beautiful young ladies that look at me as God ;)

No beautiful women in Slovakia?

PS - I have family in Slovakia

20 posted on 10/07/2008 5:57:34 PM PDT by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: Hot Tabasco

Available sex? You mean, available prostitutes. Men take these “sex vacations” to places like Thailand and have sex with girls for a month on the cheap. And I do mean “girls”. Young girls forced to be prostitutes. I don’t see how these men can live with themselves. Disgusting. You hate to tell someone else how to live his life, but the golden rule is about not harming others. Our rights are about not harming others. Traveling to where the whores are cheap so you can indulge in them for weeks on end is a sign of pretty piss poor character in a man, if you ask me. Scumbags.


21 posted on 10/07/2008 6:38:12 PM PDT by Freedom_Is_Not_Free
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To: B-Chan
That would help alot (believe me, I once had to deal with a Texas water permit!), but if you were to be come 100% self sustaining, much of the western side of the state is in trouble. Alot of the water table is brackish now because of over irrigation.
22 posted on 10/07/2008 6:59:49 PM PDT by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: redgolum

We Texans waste water like crazy...


23 posted on 10/07/2008 7:21:41 PM PDT by B-Chan (Catholic. Monarchist. Texan. Any questions?)
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To: AlexW

>>>I have been here in Slovakia

Shouldn’t you be rich from currency appreciation of Slovakia?

How much cheaper is Phillipines over Slovakia? Maybe you need to move out of town.


24 posted on 10/07/2008 8:52:28 PM PDT by Hop A Long Cassidy
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To: Hot Tabasco

“There’s more to life than sex.”

Did I say anything about sex?


25 posted on 10/07/2008 11:12:27 PM PDT by AlexW (Reporting from Bratislava, Slovakia. Happy not to be back in the USA for now.)
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To: 2banana

“No beautiful women in Slovakia?”

Yes, Slovakia and most all Slavic countries have very beautiful women. They are, however, quite cold and independent. Very few speak any English.
Walking down the street, they will not even make eye contact, much less smile.
Also, if your more then a few years older, forget it.

In the Phils, they all smile at you and age means nothing at all. I see many expats well over 50 that have wives or girlfriends in their 20s.


26 posted on 10/07/2008 11:21:29 PM PDT by AlexW (Reporting from Bratislava, Slovakia. Happy not to be back in the USA for now.)
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To: Hop A Long Cassidy

“How much cheaper is Phillipines over Slovakia? Maybe you need to move out of town.”

Phillippines will cost me half of what it cost me here in Slovakia.

Why would I be rich from currency appreciation????
When I first visited Slovakia back in 2002, I could get
40 SK per dollar. Now I get only 20 !!!!


27 posted on 10/07/2008 11:33:12 PM PDT by AlexW (Reporting from Bratislava, Slovakia. Happy not to be back in the USA for now.)
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